Connecticut Manufacturing Workforce Development Initiative

workforce development for manufacturers in ct

Creating Apprenticeship Opportunities Via "Closing the Skills Gap" Grant

To enhance existing training programs and create high-quality apprenticeship opportunities, the "Closing the Skills Gap" supports innovative internship models for new industry fields and populations on state and national scales.

Flexible Courses for Your Company's Future

The nationally recognized Connecticut Manufacturing Workforce Development Initiative (CMWDI) is funding four-week, 45-hour apprenticeship training sessions. Courses will be offered online, on-campus, or in Goodwin University’s advanced manufacturing mobile training lab. With the program’s online platform, students can review their curriculum at their convenience — anywhere, anytime.

Apprentices are guided and supported by experienced Goodwin faculty and training staff, knowledgeable in the students’ chosen course of study.

Through effective and encouraging communications, discussion boards that translate learning materials into real-life manufacturing skills, and a variety of virtual meetings, CMWDI encourages students’ passions and properly prepares them for their profession.

Advantages of the Employee Apprenticeship Experience

CMWDI will benefit 1,600 workers and 125 manufacturing companies (with a registered or non-registered apprenticeship) across Connecticut.

If you are looking to address the disconnect between industry needs and individual skills while developing high caliber talent for your organization, look no further. Whether promoting the expansion of your existing apprenticeship program or starting one from scratch, your company will lend a helping hand in strengthening the state’s skilled labor force.

Individuals who complete their apprenticeship program will earn a certificate of completion from their training provider. The certificate may then lead to possible professional achievements such as additional responsibilities, raises, and promotions.

Apprentice Workshops that Work for You

Innovative courses of study include:

  • Team Building in Quality Management Systems
  • Quality Measurement Tools
  • Electricity I
  • Electricity II
  • Production Techniques
  • Team Building Lean Manufacturing and Statistical Process Control (SPC)
  • Manufacturing Maintenance
  • Non-destructive Examination I
  • Non-destructive Examination II
  • Non-destructive Examination III
  • Introduction to Composites I
  • Introduction to Composites II
  • Blueprint Reading Fundamentals
  • Advanced Blue Print Reading and GD +T
  • Shop Math and Geometry
  • Basic Blueprint Reading and Shop Math
  • GD+T and Geometry
  • Introduction to Manufacturing and Quality
  • Understanding Six Sigma
  • Automation and Robotics

Five Factors for Grant Eligibility

1. Paid Work Component

Employers need to:

  • Pay apprentices at least the federal, state, or local minimum wage
  • Or, pay apprentices a federally approved stipend (if applicable)
  • Describe wage progression requirements and how programs will provide apprentices the opportunity to gain upward mobility in their industry

2. Work-Based Learning Mentorship

Apprentices will:

  • Be given opportunities to apply what they are learning through well-designed, structured work experiences
  • Receive guidance from mentors, including support within their industry, company culture, or specific workplace policies and procedures

3. Educational and Instructional Component

Classroom and instruction need to:

  • Be of sufficient quality for apprentices to reach their goals
  • Produce credentials that are industry-recognized, portable, and may be designed to ensure apprentices receive college credit

4. Industry-recognized Credentials Earned

Employers need to:

  • Describe how many credentials are obtained within their application and what the apprentice needs to do to earn them
  • If the credential earned is independent, describe the alternative credential, and information on who is offering the exam

5. Safety, Supervision, and Equal Employment Opportunity

Employers need to:

  • Adhere to a safe working environment and all federal, state, and local safety requirements
  • Follow all equal employment opportunity laws and regulations

CMWDI Course Descriptions

Team Building with Quality
27.0 hrs
These courses will train to build effective teams of personnel then explain the basics of a Quality Management System. Team topics include: Working in a group, Group Communication, Effective Collaboration, Life stages of a team, Meetings, Diversity, Creativity, Problem-solving, Decision making and Conflict management. Quality Topics include: Intro to Quality, ISO9000, Standards organizations, Basic quality roles and responsibilities, Quality concepts, The cost of quality, Managing quality, Quality documents, Corrective and Preventative action, Intro to SPC, Probability and Variation, The control chart, Control chart Analysis, Process capability, Problem solving tools and problem solving.

Quality Measurement Tools
30.1 hrs
This course walks the student through familiarization and use of the most widely used tools to measure parts in a quality or production setting. Measurement topics include: Intro to precision instruments, Rules, Calipers, Micrometers, Small hole gages, Dial indicators, Bore gages, Height gages, Go/No-go gages, Attribute gages, Thickness and Radius gages, Squares and Protractors, Adjustable parallels, Surface plates, Optical comparators, Optical center finders, Grip gages, Countersink gages, Fastener height gages, Rivet inspection gages, Fastener inspection gages, Gap inspection and Welding gages.

Electricity I
20.0 hrs
The Electricity I course walks through the basics of electricity from power generation through the building blocks of electronics today. Electricity I topics include: Production, transmission and uses of electricity, Atomic structure, Circuits, current, voltage, power, resistance, ohm’s and watt’s law, direct current, batteries, circuit analysis, electromagnetism and associated devices, AC waveform generation, transformers, capacitors and semiconductors.

Electricity II
20.0 hrs
The Electricity II course builds on the Electricity II course while adding more application specific devices, such as: Wires, connectors and circuit protection, DC, AC and 3-phase motors, fiber optics, quality and safety, sensor technology, Hand tools and techniques for wiring, electrical measurement and unit conversion and resistance measurement equipment.

Production Techniques
26.4 hrs
This course instructs a combination of Electrical production techniques, the use and installation of a wide-array of fasteners and the use of several hand tools, used widely in industry today. Topics include: Electrical terminals and splices, crimp lugs and terminals and associated tooling, coaxial cable, associated connectors, connector tools and assemblies, Temporary fasteners, rivets, bolts, screws and washers, Threaded inserts, Hi-Loks, lockbolts, nut plates, blind rivets, identifying fasteners, fasteners and fits, securing and lock wiring fasteners, torques tools, files, hand reamers and lapping tools, hammers, punches and chisels, pliers and ratchets, scribes, optical center finders and drill blocks.

Team Building with Lean and SPC
24.4 hrs
Team building and lean walks through the basics of developing and managing a good team structure with an emphasis on lean manufacturing. Topics include: Working in a group, Group Communication, Effective Collaboration, Life stages of a team, Meetings, Diversity, Creativity, Problem-solving, Decision making, Conflict management, lean principles, the history of lean manufacturing, workplace organization and the 5S’s, sort, straighten, shine, standardize and sustain, Intro to SPC, probability and variation, control chart and control chart analysis, process capability and problem solving tools.

Manufacturing Maintenance
23.0 rs
This series runs through some of the basics of shop automation and associated drive mechanisms. The primary goals are to familiarize one with the programmable logic controllers, hydraulics and pneumatics. Topic matter includes: Introduction to programmable controllers and digital electronics, types, functions, structure and physical integration of PLC, Internal structure of a CPU, Basic concepts of programming PLC, common applications of PLC, Intro to hydraulics, theory, fluids and systems, Intro to pneumatics, systems, the property of gases, air compression and distribution.

Non-Destructive Examination I
22.3 hrs
In this first course on Non-destructive examination, the basics and the methods are discussed along with some of the testing types. Topics include: What is NDE, NDE methods, careers, intro to visual testing, light and human eye, standard inspection techniques, visual testing equipment, manufacturing produced discontinuities, standards and procedures, visual testing of castings, visual testing of wrought metal, visual testing of welds, in-service visual inspection, Magnetic Particle inspection and examination, magnetism and magnetic flux.

Non-Destructive Examination II
26.8 hrs
In the second course, there is a greater emphasis on theory and technique, with an emphasis on magnetic particle testing for metals. Topics include: Electricity and magnetism, cast and wrought ferromagnetic metals, secondary metal processing, Intro to magnetic particle examination equipment and materials, both portable and non-portable, lighting equipment, magnetic particle materials, field testing devices, light meters, part preparation, technique selection, magnetizing currents, sample examinations and magnetic particle examination standards.

Non-Destructive Examination III
23.8 hrs
In the final segment of this course, a greater emphasis is placed on examining commercial products that are in-use such as aeronautic parts. Topics include: The NDE process, materials, metals manufacturing and processes, material properties, loads, stresses and discontinuities, fracture mechanics, personnel qualifications, visual testing, light, standard inspection techniques, visual testing equipment, hierarchy of product standards, visual testing of castings, rolled products, welds and industrial components.

Introduction to Composites I
23.9 hrs
This session discusses composite materials and the processing that is used to manufacture it. Discussions take you through the factory floor, equipment used, curing and post-processing. Topics include: Background and history of composites, composite industries and products, advantages and disadvantages, safety and hazards, facility layout, contamination, layup and curing areas, fibers, tapes and fabrics, glass and carbon fibers, matrix types and properties, curing process, honeycomb core materials, material compatibility, galvanic reactivity, core potting compounds, fiber material storage, forming tools, coefficient of thermal expansion, forming tool inspection, cleaning and storage, rollers and sweeps, overhead laser system.

Introduction to Composites II
22.4 hrs
In this second session, there is more of a focus on kitting, layup and inspection of composite parts. Topics include: Kitting with a sheeter, by-hand or by an automated machine, ply-balancing, material splicing, wrinkles and gaps, pockets and voids, radius filler fabrication, bagging, layup equipment and processes, cure cycle, inspection of composites, visual, ultrasonic and tap inspection techniques, damage assessment and composite repairs, repair tools and material, different layups, unidirectional 4-ply, carbon 8-ply with core, fiberglass 6-ply wet layup, marking holes and drilling composites, enlarging holes, surface damage assessment and repair, disbonding damage assessment and repair.

Blue Print Reading Fundamentals
28.3 hrs
This course covers the fundamentals of blueprint reading and interpretation. Students develop basic knowledge and skills in the following topics: engineering drawing and blueprint terminology, views, line types, dimensions and tolerances, and symbols. The second half of the course expands on these skills with GD&T introduction, assemblies and fits, fasteners, wire bundle installation, electrical production illustrations, engineering communication, composite drawings, and work instructions.

Advanced Blue Print Reading and GD&T
23.3 hrs
For students who already posses basic blue print reading skills, this course includes advanced blue print skills and GD&T. Topics include assemblies and fits, fasteners, wire bundle installation, electrical production illustrations, engineering communication, composite drawings, and work instructions. The Second half of the course covers the basics of GD&T, including terms and symbols, rules of GD&T, geometric tolerances, datums, and form, profile, orientation, runout, and location tolerance types.

Shop Math and Geometry
20.3 hrs
Shop math and geometry starts with basic arithmetic skills manufacturing workers use regularly. These include arithmetic operations, fractions, decimals, number line, positive and negative numbers, cartesian coordinates and the metric system. Geometry topics include basic geometry, angles, lines, polygons, and triangles. Geometry is recommended as a prerequisite for GD&T.

Basic Blue Print Reading and Shop Math
27.1 hrs
This course is for students who need basic blue print skills combined with the requisite arithmetic skills for the manufacturing workplace. Blue print topics include engineering drawing and blueprint terminology, views, line types, dimensions and tolerances, and symbols. Math topics include arithmetic operations, fractions, decimals, number line, positive and negative numbers, cartesian coordinates and the metric system.

GD&T and Geometry
24.2 hrs
GD&T and Geometry is for students who already posses basic blue print and arithmetic skills, and need to raise their skill set to the next level. Competence in geometry directly reinforces students’ understanding of GD&T concepts. Geometry topics include basic geometry, angles, lines, polygons, and triangles. GD&T topics include terms and symbols, rules of GD&T, geometric tolerances, datums, and form, profile, orientation, runout, and location tolerance types.

Introduction to Manufacturing and Quality
24.4 hrs
This provides an introduction to manufacturing and a quality systems. This overview gives students a basic understanding of manufacturing concepts and the importance of quality systems. Manufacturing topics include advanced manufacturing, manufacturing history and technology, ideas to products, manufacturing design, quality and the environment, measuring success in manufacturing, and careers in manufacturing. Quality topics include ISO 9000, standards organizations, quality organizations, quality roles and responsibilities, quality concepts, the cost of quality, managing quality, quality documents, corrective and preventive action, introduction to SPC, probability and variation, the control chart, control chart analysis, process capability, problem solving tools, and problem solving.

Are you interested in learning more about the Connecticut Manufacturing Workforce Initiative?

Contact Us Today!

Melanie Hoben
Director of Workforce Development

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