View Profile

Faculty Profiles

0 entries
0 comments
Name
Kimberly Myers Ed.D.
Profile Picture
Title
Program Director, Criminal Justice, Homeland Security, and Public Safety & Security
Department
Social and Educational Sciences
Program
Criminal Justice, Homeland Security, Public Safety and Security
Phone
(860) 913-2157
Email
kmyers@goodwin.edu
Office Location
Social Sciences Dept, 4th Floor
Status
Full-Time
Courses Taught
Introduction to Criminal Justice, Juvenile Justice in America, Interview and Interrogation, Introduction to Law Enforcement, Investigative Report Writing, Contemporary Issues in Crime and Prevention, Principles of Criminal Investigations, Public Policy, Probation, Parole & Community Corrections, Multiculturalism in Public Safety & Security, Organized and White Collar Crime,
Bio
Kimberly was formerly employed by the Connecticut State Police Bureau of Identification, specializing in fingerprint identification and classification. She has taught state trooper trainees at the Connecticut State Police Academy. In addition she has taught Criminal Justice courses at University of Hartford in West Hartford, Connecticut and Mitchell College in New London, Connecticut.
Education
Ed.D. Educational Leadership — University of Hartford
MS, Criminal Justice with a concentration in Public Administration — American International College
BA, Criminology and a minor in Psychology — Central Connecticut State University
AS, Criminal Justice — Briarwood College
Honors / Awards
Teaching Fellow: Universal Design for Learning
Goodwin College, East Hartford, CT
Areas of Interest / Study / Research
Kimberly’s research area surrounds active-shooter training, policy implementation, threat assessment, and preparedness on college and university campuses. She also has an ongoing interest in college campus public safety issues.
Publications
Myers, K. (2017, Jan/Feb). Higher Education Institutions: Complex and Underprepared for Active-Shooter Situations. Campus Law Enforcement Journal IACLEA, 47(1), 34-38.

Plan, Prepare, and Respond to an Active Shooter Situation: An Investigation of Public Safety Directors at Private Four-Year Colleges and Universities (2016)
Conference Presentations
LaRocco, D., Dowd, P., Goods, K., Kania, J., Myers, K., & Sheehan, D., (2018, May). Transformational Professional Development in Universal Design for Learning: Reflections on Faculty Practice. Symposium Presentation at the 50th Annual New England Educational Research Organization NEERO Conference, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Myers, K. (2017, April). Plan, Prepare, and Respond for An Active Shooter Situation: An Investigation of Public Safety Directors at Private Four-Year Colleges and Universities. Poster Presentation at the 49th Annual New England Educational Research Organization NEERO Conference, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Myers, K. (2015, April/May). Active-Shooter Policy Implementation, Preparedness, and Threat Assessment: A Survey of Public Safety Directors at Private Four-Year Colleges and Universities. Presentation at the 47th Annual New England Educational Research Organization NEERO Conference, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
Teaching Philosophy
As a professor, I strive to engage, challenge, and inspire growth in my students. I find teaching invigorating because it affords me the opportunity to share my passion while continuing to participate in facilitating the learning process with my students. As a professor, I find interactions among students inspiring, and I enjoy the challenges presented to me by students when they express their individual thoughts and questions. As a result of these challenges, I believe that teaching is essential to my personal and professional development. I also find using a variety of instructional strategies to help teach a diverse classroom of learners fascinating. My instructive approach incorporates theory, interactive educational elements, and real world applications in a manner that seeks to stimulate students and inspire them to become passionate about their personal and professional development.

It is my belief that when students are empowered, they are motivated to strive to their personal best professionally, personally, and civically. As criminal justice is an applied social science, it incorporates principles from other social sciences such as sociology, psychology, and political science. I find it beneficial to students to incorporate aspects of those disciplines to provide them with skills necessary to view issues from different areas. Having the ability to view issues from various perspectives increases student preparedness for employment in a variety of settings in or out of the criminal justice field.

In order to obtain a balance of theory, interactive educational elements, and real world applications with students, I utilize tools such as a standard text that covers a broad range of material from basic theory to relative modern issues in the criminal justice system. Material is presented in the form of interactive lectures that foster student participation by allowing students to ask questions and challenge ideas. I also incorporate creative supplemental assignments that promote the use of critical thinking and analytical skills. Written and verbal communication skills are vital to any field of study. I provide my students with written assignments that culminate into research papers and presentations. Concepts that are reinforced in written and oral assignments are research, computer skills, grammar, and public speaking. The aforementioned skills transcend the academic arena into the workforce, and I feel they are fundamental to a student’s prolonged success.

In summary, I strive to provide students with an atmosphere that promotes personal, professional, and educational growth while encouraging students to think critically and analytically about various criminal justice issues. I also aim to be accessible outside of the classroom for advising and to address any personal concerns pertaining to the comprehension of specific issues, assignments, and concepts. I believe that it is important to be a resource for students wishing to pursue a career in the criminal justice field as well as for students who take criminal justice classes for personal interest. In my opinion, success is not only about achievement, but rather, the totality of the educational experience.