Course Descriptions

The course numbering system has two parts that identify both the discipline and the level of difficulty of the course.

For example: XXX – 000

XXX are the letters of the course specialty such as CAP for office Computer Applications, MED for medical science, CST for computer systems, etc. 000 are the numbers of the course -- courses beginning with the digit "0" are foundational courses. These are 0-credit courses and do not count towards the credit requirement for a degree. Courses beginning with the digit "1" are credit courses at the introductory level, and courses beginning with the digit "2", "3", and "4" are advanced level courses.

The following codes found at the end of course descriptions denote the perspectives, competencies and requirements the course fulfills:

CS - Communications Systems perspective
C – Cultural perspective
A - Analytic perspective
S – Social Sciences perspective
G - Global perspective
mc – multicultural competency
e/p - ethical/philosophical competency
aw – advanced writing competency
comm – communications requirement
comp – writing course requirement
cl – computer literacy requirement
r – research paper requirement
w – global perspective world requirement
us – global perspective United States requirement

The * indicates the course is offered every odd year. The ** indicates the course is offered every even year.

Courses are offered in three modalities. Almost all are offered as traditional residential courses. Many are also offered online or in a hybrid or blended format. Hybrid courses usually meet four to five times on campus during the semester. The remainder of the course work is down in an online format. Course offerings for each semester are published approximately twelve weeks prior to the beginning of the semester and are listed Courses are designated in this publication as (H) for hybrid or (O) for online. Course with no designation are offered in the traditional residential format.

Please note: Students placing into Foundational English courses will need permission from their advisor to register for any college level course work.

ACC ASD ASL BIO BMM BUS CAP CHEM
CJS COM DHP ECE ECN EDU EMT ENG
ENV FS GEO HIS HLT HSC HSM HSR
HUM IS MATH MCD MED NUR OPS OS
OTA PAR PHB PHIL PHY PSC PSY PSS
RSP SCI SOC SPAN STAT      

Accounting

ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I

ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I

3 credits
This course is an introduction to accounting using the double-entry system with journals, ledgers, worksheets, and financial statements. Students will learn to journalize transactions, post to the general ledger, prepare financial statements and prepare the closing process. This course will prepare students to account for receivables and uncollectible accounts. Through the use of prepared statements and a corporate annual report students will learn the Calculation of Current Ratio, Debt Ratio and other financial statement ratios.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 098; CAP 110
Offered: Fall, Spring

ACC 110 - Applied Accounting

ACC 110 - Applied Accounting

3 credits
This course is designed to introduce the basic principles of accounting analysis to the non-accounting major. Focusing on the knowledge and skills a manager needs to understand standard financial documents produced by accountants, students will develop an understanding of financial topics including current assets, plant assets, depreciation and amortization of intangible assets. This course will also discuss accounts receivables, payables, inventory and cost of goods sold. Students will prepare and perform analysis of financial statements. Financial rations will be introduced as an integrated analysis. Students will learn to red and understand an annual report.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 098; CAP 110
Offered: Fall, Spring

ACC 210 - Principles of Accounting II

ACC 210 - Principles of Accounting II

3 credits
This course is designed to further the study of generally accepted accounting principles. Accounting for inventory, plant and intangible assets, depreciation and amortization, accounts receivable, long-term assets, partnerships, and corporations will be covered. Students will be assigned a project involving analysis of an annual report of a corporation.
Prerequisite(s): C- or better in ACC 101
Offered: Spring, Summer

ACC 220 - Managerial Accounting

ACC 220 - Managerial Accounting

3 credits
This course provides a basic understanding of the role of accounting information in the business decision-making process. This course is designed to provide students with a focus on accounting from the management perspective. Students will improve their decision-making skills, and to assist them in understanding how to use accounting information to make quality business decisions. Students will learn to calculate break-even point, target net income, job-order and process costing and to use accounting in a manufacturing environment. Students will learn to prepare reports with recommendations to management regarding financial decisions.
Prerequisite(s): C- or better in ACC 101
Offered: Spring

ACC 230 - Principles of Taxation

ACC 230 - Principles of Taxation

3 credits
This course presents the study of federal taxation for as it relates to filing, requirements, compliance, tax planning and reporting. Students will analyze the basic framework utilized in measuring and reporting taxable income for individuals and businesses. Tax rates, exemptions, credits, deductions, filing deadlines, extensions and amended returns will also be studied.
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ACC 235 - Accounting Information Systems

ACC 235 - Accounting Information Systems

3 credits
This course provides an overview of QuickBooks and Peachtree accounting software. The course will also introduce SAP and Oracle Hyperion accounting software. The course will cover the major points of using QuickBooks and Peachtree to enter transactions and generate forms and reports. The focus of the course will be to use the tools the software offers and to integrate accounting concepts and principles with the software designed to apply them.
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ACC 240 - Intermediate Accounting

ACC 240 - Intermediate Accounting

3 credits
An examination of generally accepted accounting principles related to the preparation of financial statements including a review of current assets and liabilities. The study of non-current assets and liabilities, debt and equity financing and earnings per share is studied in detail.
Offered: Fall, Spring

ACC 299 - Accounting Capstone

ACC 299 - Accounting Capstone

4 credits
Students will work to acquire Certified Bookkeeper designation from the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers, the Intuit QuickBooks Certified User designation from Intuit Corp. and the Microsoft office Specialist Designation in Excel form Microsoft Corp. Software package certifications will be compromised of the most appropriate version available. Students will also be required to complete a resume and comprehend interviewing and teamwork and communication skills.
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


ASD

ASD 088 - Tools for Success

ASD 088 - Tools for Success

0 credits
This course is designed to support students as they develop the skills necessary to transition to college. Students will discuss the benefits of higher education, become familiar with a college setting, and learn the technology needed to access instructional and support services. Emphasis will be placed on self-assessment, goal setting and the creation of a life and career plan. Course activities will reinforce skills learned in other classes as well as help students develop personal networks, problem solving skills and effective study habits that will better position them to take control of their future.
Corequisite(s): ENG 088
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ASD 120 - The College Experience

ASD 120 - The College Experience

3 credits
This provides students with the skills and knowledge required to succeed in college. The course engages students in the college community and prepares students to become leaders, self-advocates and active participants in their education. Topics covered include time management, critical thinking, test preparation strategies, information literacy and technology skills. Students will demonstrate civic responsibility by completing a community learning project.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


American Sign Language

ASL 101 - Beginning American Sign Language

ASL 101 - Beginning American Sign Language

3 credits
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL). ASL is a conceptual language with its own grammar and structure and not merely encoded or fingerspelled English. Students will experience and acquire ASL skills through conversations, group activities, roll play and interpreted music. This class will also address the various aspects of Deaf culture, such as sociology, education and theater, with weekly readings and discussions. C
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring

ASL 201 - Sign Language II

ASL 201 - Sign Language II

3 credits
This course is a continuation of Beginning American Sign Language I. Students will continue to acquire the fundamentals of ASL, but with more nuanced usage. Unique conceptual grammatical elements such as classifiers, that are hand shapes representing a specific subject, will be explored and emphasized during this semester. Students will experience and acquire ASL skills through conversations, group activities, role-play and interpreted music. This class will also continue to address the various aspects of Deaf culture, such as current issues, sociology, education and theater, with weekly readings and discussions. C
Prerequisite(s): ASL 101
Offered: Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Biology

BIO 101 - Concepts in Human Biology

BIO 101 - Concepts in Human Biology

3 credits
This 45- hour course provides an overview of the organ systems of the human body and basic concepts of cell biology and structure, including the study of anatomical and physiological interrelationships; organization of cells, tissues and body systems; and structure and function of muscular, skeletal, endocrine, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary, nervous and reproductive systems. The course covers examples of diseases of each body system as well as the relationship of nutrition and metabolism to the digestive system. This course does not fulfill the requirements for the Nursing and Respiratory Care programs. A
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIO 102 - Anatomy & Pathophysiology for ICD-10 Coding

BIO 102 - Anatomy & Pathophysiology for ICD-10 Coding

3 credits
This course concentrates on teaching the anatomy and pathophysiology of the human body. Students will concentrate on a systemic approach to the human body with emphasis on the anatomic structure. The course focuses on expanding the students' knowledge of medical terms, body structure, and pathologic diseases and disorders. The course does not fulfill requirements for the Nursing or Respiratory Care programs
Prerequisite(s): HCS 105
Offered: Fall

BIO 108 - Anatomy and Physiology I for Paramedics

BIO 108 - Anatomy and Physiology I for Paramedics

3 credits
This course is a study of the human body and its biological organization specifically designed for students entering the emergency medicine service fields. Students will learn the basic function of living organisms; identify the cellular levels of organization and the organ systems of the human body. Emphasis will be placed on homeostasis as well as disease process. A
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

BIO 109 - Anatomy and Physiology II for Paramedics

BIO 109 - Anatomy and Physiology II for Paramedics

3 credits
This course expands upon the knowledge acquired in Human Anatomy and Physiology I for Paramedics, BIO 108. Students will concentrate on a systematic approach to the human organism, including the body as a whole, its major organ systems, their inter-elations and how they change throughout a person's life. Additional emphasis will be placed on clinical and health related topic as they apply to the care of the patient in the emergency medical services field. A
Prerequisite(s): BIO 108
Offered: Spring

BIO 120 - Human Biology

BIO 120 - Human Biology

4 credits
This course introduces the basic principles of human biology. Lectures topics include: chemical basis of life, cellular organization and function, physiological regulations, genes and the basis of heredity and evolution. In addition, various organ systems and their interrelationships will be explored. The laboratory portions of the course are coordinated with lecture content and involves some dissection. Formerly listed as BIO 100. A
Prerequisite(s): High school science with a lab, placement in ENG 101 and MATH 099 or completion of SCI 110, placement in ENG 101 and MATH 099 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIO 121 - General Biology

BIO 121 - General Biology

4 credits
This course introduces the basic principles of human biology. Lectures topics include: chemical basis of life, cellular organization and function, physiological regulations, genes and the basis of heredity and evolution. In addition, various organ systems and their interrelationships will be explored. The laboratory portions of the course are coordinated with lecture content and involves some dissection. Formerly listed as BIO 100. A
Prerequisite(s): High school science with a lab, placement in ENG 101 and MATH 099 or completion of SCI 110 , placement in ENG 101 and MATH 099 or DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIO 211 - Anatomy and Physiology I

BIO 211 - Anatomy and Physiology I

4 credits
This course is a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body. Emphasis is on the chemical, anatomical and physiological principles of cells and tissues of the human body as well as the integumentary, muscular, skeletal, and nervous system. Laboratory sessions are coordinated with the lectures and emphasize experimentation and application of the lecture content. Experiments are supplemented by microscopic analysis of selected slides, specimen dissection, chemical experimentation and review of anatomical models. Formerly listed as BIO 110. A
Prerequisite(s): BIO 120 or BIO 121
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIO 212 - Anatomy and Physiology II

BIO 212 - Anatomy and Physiology II

4 credits
This course is a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body. Emphasis is on the anatomy and physiology of the sensory, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, lymphatic, gastrointestinal, renal, and reproductive systems. Discussion will also include the diseases of these systems. Laboratory sessions are coordinated with the lectures and emphasize experimentation and application of the lecture content. Experiments are supplemented by the dissection of the fetal pig, microscopic analysis of selected slides, and review of anatomical models. Formerly listed as BIO 111. A
Prerequisite(s): BIO 211
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BIO 214 - Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology of the Eye

BIO 214 - Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology of the Eye

4 credits
Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology of the Eye is a fundamental course in helping ophthalmic science professionals learn how the eye functions. Topics include the overall anatomy of the eye and orbital structure, how the sense of sight is produced, anatomical and biological causes of refractive errors and common eye disorders, as well as diseases of the eye and associated treatments. Laboratory sessions are coordinated with the lectures and emphasize experimentation and application of the lecture content. Experiments are supplemented by the review of anatomical models, dissection, identification of various eye pathology, introduction to ophthalmic equipment and instrumentation. Students will also observe techniques in modern cataract surgery (phacoemulsification) and LASIK.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 214 must be passed with a “C” or better prior to admission to the Ophthalmic Science program.
Offered:*Course may be available on-ground, hybrid, or online

BIO 235 - Microbiology

BIO 235 - Microbiology

4 credits
This course explores the role of microorganisms in disease and health. Coverage includes the structure, function, growth and transmission of viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoans, and helminths as well as vectors of pathogenic agents. Laboratory activities include study of the growth, detection, and analysis of various microbial and parasitic organisms. Formerly listed as BIO 210. A
Prerequisite(s): BIO 120 or BIO 121
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


BMM

BMM 101 - Key Principles of Manufacturing

BMM 101 - Key Principles of Manufacturing

3 credits
This course explores the exciting field of manufacturing. It introduces the student to concepts of production, logistics and inventory controls and their relationships to the local and global economy. The basic principles and practices of a safe and productive manufacturing environment are explored. Safety instruction covers topics including; Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), confined space, lock out/tag out, zero energy state, haz¬ardous materials, storage of flammable materials, storage of fuel gas and high pressure gas cylinders, portable powered tool safety, hand tool safety, record keeping, training, employer enforcement of safety regulations, and right to know. This course also cov¬ers communication and teamwork skills as they relate to the manufacturing workplace and explores the roles and responsibilities in managing customer expectations. This course will use lec¬ture, group work, online simulation and programming to prepare students for Production Certification Testing through Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC).
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 110 - Technology in Advanced Manufacturing

BMM 110 - Technology in Advanced Manufacturing

3 credits
This course introduces the student to the manufacturing processes through an exploration of the basics of production, the types and sources of raw materials as well as production processes that include casting, molding, and forming. Students explore the types of machining, conditioning of parts, finishing and assembly. Additional topics include manufacturing planning, production control, and product distribu¬tion. Students will be expected to understand the product life cycle from conception through distribution. This course also focuses on technologies used in production processes. Basic power systems, energy transfer systems, machine operation and control will be explored. A focus on safety and quality for continuous improvement is highlighted. This course will use lecture, online simulation and programming to prepare students for Production Certification Testing through Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC).
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 125 - Manufacturing Logistics

BMM 125 - Manufacturing Logistics

3 credits
Introductory logistics classes familiarize students with the basic concepts of product distribution and the terminology used in the logistics field. Students learn the process of planning effective product distribution and discuss methods of transportation and traffic management techniques. Other topics covered in introductory logistics classes may include inventory control, protective packaging and customer service. This course will use lec¬ture, group work, online simulation and programming to prepare students for certification as a Manufacturing Logistics Technician (CLT) through Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC).
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 126 - Introduction to Materials and Logistics Management

BMM 126 - Introduction to Materials and Logistics Management

3 credits
Course will cover all the essentials of materials management, manufacturing planning, purchasing and physical distribution of products from marketing to customers. Students will learn production planning and material requirements planning (MRP), enterprise resource planning (ERP) and capacity planning. Case studies and in class exercises will provide students with a step-by-step approach to calculate and analyze inventory lot sizes, Kanban, safety stock, forecasting and logistics requirements. In addition, students will develop skills in, lean production, JIT manufacturing and terms for use in global supply chain management.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM101, BMM110, and BMM 125.
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 135 - Green Manufacturing

BMM 135 - Green Manufacturing

3 credits
This course provides an overview about green technologies and green jobs in manufacturing. Students will develop the skills necessary to preserve and restore environmental quality and create a green working environment for your company. This course introduces students to local, state and national green/clean/lean/sustainable resources, share industry success stories (learn how your business neighbors are implementing sustainable practices) and gather input from companies on what educators should be doing to prepare the current/future green workforce This course will use lec¬ture, group work, online simulation and programming to prepare students for Green Manufacturing Technician Certification Testing through Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC).
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents.
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 140 - Principles in Manufacturing Mathematics

BMM 140 - Principles in Manufacturing Mathematics

3 credits
This course begins with a review of basic operations of numbers, frac¬tions and decimals. It then covers the practical mathematics that every machinist is expected to use in the shop in the creation of machined parts and maintenance of tools and fixtures. This includes common fraction to decimal and vice-versa conversions, inch to metric and vice-versa conversions, calculating part and feature dimensions and locations, calculating speeds and feeds, calculating tap drill sizes with formulas and charts, converting surface feet per minute to RPM’s, calculating tapers for machine set-up, plane geometry calculations, sine bar set-up, measurements of right triangles, angular and simple indexing calculations.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents.
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 175 - CNC Machining

BMM 175 - CNC Machining

3 credits
This course focuses on the modern computer numeric control (CNC) operator. Through the use of interactive virtual simulators students learn the essentials of CNC machining. Participants will learn mill, lathe and grinder set-up and operation; tool identification, set-up, use and maintenance; statistical process control (SPC); and the skills operators need. Students will experience lecture, demonstration, and on-line simulation to prepare for NIMS certification as a CNC operator.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 210 - Lean Manufacturing Principles

BMM 210 - Lean Manufacturing Principles

3 credits
This course introduces the student to the philosophical background, historical development, and fundamental concepts of lean manufacturing with a focus on the Toyota Production System. Students explore lean strategies around inventory, lead time, and cultural change requirements. Students learn strategies for lean implementation, planning, goal setting and sustaining gains. The course also applies to the application of lean disciplines and concepts to service and support industries. The use and implementation of lean disciplines promote continuous improvement, eliminates waste, reduces operating cost, improves quality, and achieves mea¬surable improvement in customer satisfaction.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 220 - Materials & Processes in Manufacturing

BMM 220 - Materials & Processes in Manufacturing

3 credits
Students are provided with essential information on material properties, material behaviors and material manufacturing processes. The atomic, crystal, grain and defect structure will be introduced, and their effect on the mechanical properties of materials will be presented. Equilibrium phase diagrams will be discussed. An understanding of the properties of iron alloys and steels will be developed. Material processing techniques such as heat treatment, casting, metal forming, welding, coatings and adhesive bonding will be covered. Powder metallurgy processing and material processes will be introduced along with a brief introduction to non-destructive test (NDT) methods.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101 and BMM 110
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 221 - Warehouse and Distribution Center Management

BMM 221 - Warehouse and Distribution Center Management

3 credits
This course will introduce the student to distribution and warehouse management with emphasis on supply chain networks. Students will learn various aspects of warehouse operations management, bar coding, radio frequency (RFID), Kanban, just-in-time (JIT) manufacturing, inventory replenishment systems and third party logistics. Includes; analysis of warehouse locations, operations and management. This course also includes describes controls and procedures, financial analysis, security, cargo, materials handling, productivity and legal/export requirements.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101 and BMM 110
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 222 - Technical Drawings and Specifications

BMM 222 - Technical Drawings and Specifications

3 credits
This course introduces the basic principles of engineering drawings. It addresses line types, orthographic projection, and isometric views that are used in industry standards. The six basic views of parts are designed to acquaint the student with a pictorial vision of a 3D part in a flat pattern view. Areas of study include: line types, orthographic projection, isometric views, fundamental tools of title block information, drawing standards, general and special notes such as quality assurance data, non-destructive testing, symbology, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing parameters, blueprint drawing abbreviations, linear units of measurement, rules of dimensioning, inclined surfaces, measurement of angles, holes and bolt hole patterns, drawings to scale, blueprint revisions and notes. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret basic prints and visualize the features of a part or system.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 223 - International Logistics

BMM 223 - International Logistics

3 credits
Course will review the principles and practices of international logistics including the transportation and distribution process. Students will learn international distribution systems and various multimodal transportation methods. Other topics that will be examined include: currency, fees, tariffs, trade policies and import and export regulations. Students will also develop international logistics knowledge of packaging, security requirement and the various forms of documentation required for international logistics.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101,BMM 110, and BMM125
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 224 - Metrology and Calibration

BMM 224 - Metrology and Calibration

3 credits
This course focuses on how to develop, implement, and maintain a calibration system. Evaluation of the calibration program is further deepened through continuous improvement efforts. Conformity to ISO 9001 requirements enhances the credibility of calibration systems to ensure reliability and traceability. This course looks at calibration processes such as calibration procedures & records, out of tolerance conditions, calibration schedules and intervals. Students will learn and practice techniques for setting size blocks to predetermined distances to measure product, develop continuous improvement programs, create training programs and audit the calibration system.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101 and BMM 110
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 225 - Transportation Traffic and Contract Management

BMM 225 - Transportation Traffic and Contract Management

3 credits
This course will provide students with an understanding of the fundamental role and importance of transportation in companies and in society, as well as the complex environment in which transportation service is provided today. Topics covered include in-depth examination the various modes of transportation including discussions of regulations, economics and various aspects that characterize transportation modes. Students will learn costing and pricing issues related to transportation and the relationships between buyers and sellers of transportation.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101, BMM 110, and BMM125
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 226 - Quality Management Systems

BMM 226 - Quality Management Systems

3 credits
This course addresses the study of theory and practice for quality management. The theories of past management contributors are examined as a precursor for today’s quality management practices. An in-depth view of the writings from Philip Crosby, W. Edward Deming, Armand Feigenbaum, Kaoru Ishikawa, Joseph Juran, John Oakland, Taiichi Ohno, Shigeo Shingo and Genichi Taguchi are examined. This course introduces the student to contemporary developments in theory and practice of quality thinking to improve quality systems. Applied principles and techniques of quality philosophies are examined and utilized to drive resolution in quality manufacturing. A look at benchmarking and lean tools for continuous improvement, quality circles to engage both internal and external stakeholders is reviewed. What are Quality Systems and how does ISO 9000 affect them, how is ISO 9000 interpreted and what are its limitation are. Areas of study include; barriers to quality, the emergence of management, contingency theory, critical systems thinking including Senge’s Learning Organization, managing responsibilities of a quality system, a comparison of significant contributors to quality theories and organizations as systems.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 227 - Lean Supply Chain and Logistics Management

BMM 227 - Chain and Logistics Management

3 credits
This course introduces the student to the philosophical background, historical development, and fundamental concepts of lean with a focus on supply chain and logistics. Students explore lean strategies around inventory, lead time, and cultural change requirements. Students will learn the various processes and terminology used in managing supply networks. These functions include the overview of customer requirements, order entry systems, MRP, quote process and generation/issue of purchase orders. Also includes roles and functions of purchasing, inventory control, physical distribution, warehousing, transportation methods, packaging, and customs. Lean and analytical techniques will be applied to improve customer metrics. The use and implementation of lean disciplines promote continuous improvement, eliminates waste, reduces operating cost, improves quality, and achieves measurable improvement in customer satisfaction.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 110
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 228 - Quality Management and Supplier Integration

BMM 228 - Quality Management and Supplier Integration

3 credits
This course addresses current quality improvement concepts and techniques in industry with an emphasis on integrating the supplier in the internal quality process. This course introduces lean principles as they are used as tools in organizations to improve quality systems. Applied principles and techniques of quality philosophies are examined and utilized to drive resolution in quality manufacturing. Areas of study include; process control charts, nature of variation, attributes and variable charts, managing responsibilities of a quality standards in the supply base, concept of poke-yoke, comparison of significant contributors to quality theories.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 240 - CAM I

BMM 240 - CAM I

3 credits
The purpose of this course is to review design and manufacturing software and instruct the student on feature based modeling systems called SolidWorks and Mastercam. Students will learn how to create simple 2-D objects such as lines and arcs to create CAD solid models and add numerical dimensions and geometries. After CAD Models are created in SolidWorks, the files will be loaded into Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) Mastercam for CNC programming.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 241 - CAM II

BMM 241 - CAM II

3 credits
Graphical software is used to generate part programs for CNC Turning and Milling operations. Emphasis of the course is to learn additional elements of Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) to manipulate engineering part geometry and convert screen graphics into Computerized Numerical Controlled (CNC) programs. Students will learn the fundamentals of how to file and manage part models from design to manufacturing. Mastercam software will be applied for CNC programming of more complex 3-D CAD files.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 275 - CNC Machining

BMM 275 - CNC Machining

3 credits
Course provides additional concepts of CNC and the importance of fixtures and tooling and how they interface with Mastercam software. CNC programs will be developed to perform contouring operations for milling machine centers. Application of more complex features will be used to develop G and M codes to produce CNC programs to produce Climb, Pocket and Contour milling. Tooling interface, speed and feed rates will be developed along with X, Y, Z data using the Cartesian coordinate system.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 276 - CNC Machining Applications

BMM 276 - CNC Machining Applications

3 credits
CNC programming tasks are applied to produce more complex part geometries with added features. Parts geometries will be milled and turned based on solid model geometry. Various operations will be performed where parts are located using datum dimensions. Setup, fixtures, and tooling will be used to produce hardware. Multi-featured parts will be measured and inspected per work instructions and geometric tolerance requirements including true position, perpendicularity, flatness and other requirements.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 320 - Facilities Planning and Selection

BMM 320 - Facilities Planning and Selection

3 credits
This course provides students with a broad, practical understanding of the facilities planning and design process. The critical nature of a global supply chain and the need for efficient material handling is discussed and approaches to designing optimal handling systems are examined. The tools of operations, the systems involved in manufacturing and facilities and the development of quantitative approaches to planning are examined. Participants engaged in real-world examples and problems to understand the practices of facilities planning.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM101 and BMM110.
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 355 - Manufacturing Regulations & Compliance

BMM 355 - Manufacturing Regulations & Compliance

3 credits
This course examines the manufacturing regulation system that is focused on real manufacturing issues as related to ISO 9001, whose quality standards are designed to help ensure the needs of the stakeholders and customers are met; and to the requirements of federal regulatory agencies such as OSHA, the EPA, state and local compliance agencies, and other regulatory bodies that support health, safety and the environment for industry.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 375 - Advanced Lean Manufacturing

BMM 375 - Advanced Lean Manufacturing

3 credits
This course provides students with the necessary skills for aligning lean activities with strategic objectives, solving real process problems and continuously improving operations. This course moves knowledge to application. The course has a focus on value stream assessment skills to identify and remove waste in a process, and maintain the new standard. Participants learn how to apply such advanced lean tools as Kanban (pull systems), Just-in-Time (JIT), and TPM (Total Productive Maintenance). In addition, students will more deeply explore such basic Lean concepts as process controls, visual controls and 5S; then use these tools to uncover opportunities and make improvements that align with strategic objectives.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM101 and BMM210
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 440 - Industrial Safety

BMM 440 - Industrial Safety

3 credits
Stakeholder safety is a critical component of running a successful business, whether the business is in manufacturing, health care or banking. Participants in this course will learn to identify ways to reduce workplace and job-related hazards to keep workers, clients and environmental conditions safe. Procedures for handling common industrial materials are examined. Participants learn to select proper protective gear, avoid common industrial accidents, and response to potential hazards found in the workplace. Participants in this course will integrate contemporary safety practices into risk assessment plans for their organizations based on state, federal and industry safety standards.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 460 - Quality Management Systems

BMM 460 - Quality Management Systems

3 credits
This course addresses current quality improvement concepts and techniques in industry with an emphasis on modern manufacturing requirements. This course introduces the fundamental tools of Statistical Process Control (SPC) as they are used in industry to reduce costs, identify root cause, and increase productivity at a predictable quality level. Applied principles and techniques of total quality management systems will be utilized to ensure correct definition, measurement, analysis, improvement and control (DMAIC) of common manufacturing problems. Areas of study include; basic statistical and probability theory, sampling techniques, process control charts, nature of variation, histograms, attributes and variable charts, managing responsibilities of a quality standards department, development of grades/standards of quality, acceptance sampling/inspection, recording, reporting/use of control charts.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 475 - Product Development Management

BMM 475 - Product Development Management

3 credits
Students are introduced to concepts of material structure, property and testing methods as they relate to material selection and processing decisions. Participants learn the strategies and processes to respond to customer needs for product creation and modification. Quality assurance aspects of the development process are presented. Methods to identify opportunities for improvement are stressed. Dynamic input from consumers via sales and marketing is integrated in the process. The design and manufacturing of the product incorporates the quality parameters which will deliver the product that will meet the consumer’s expectations.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BMM 495 - Supply Chain Management

BMM 495 - Supply Chain Management

3 credits
This course analyzes the dynamic nature of supply chain management of products and services in a domestic and global economy. This course will expose students to topics related to design and management of supply chains, from incoming raw materials to final product delivery. While participants will be grounded in solid theory of supply chain design, they will also build a solid foundation of requisite knowledge, skills and strategies for all aspect of integrated supply chain management. This includes forecasting, postponement, globalization and sourcing, network design, and virtual integration (web-centric) through group work and case studies.
Prerequisite(s): All Foundational Coursework or Equivalents; BMM101, BMM125, and BMM126
Offered: Fall, Spring

Back to the top


Business

BUS 101 - Introduction to Management

BUS 101 - Introduction to Management

3 credits
This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of management and its relationship to customer expectations. An overview of major topics and concepts including planning and decision making, organization, staffing and leading, Information Systems, and ethics and social responsibility will be covered.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BUS 107 - Introduction to Non-profit Management

BUS 107 - Introduction to Non-profit Management

3 credits
This course provides students with an understanding of the basics on non-profit organizations that are driven by a purposeful mission yet founded on the principles of sustainable business models. It provides an overview of the non-profit sector and explores best practices in contemporary non-profit organizations. It examines the structures of non-profits, with consideration of each component as building blocks to a successful organization, including governing and leadership structures; accountability and performance measurement; strategies for building capacity and planning for change; and managing paid staff and volunteers. Students also explore areas of marketing, communication, fiscal management and acquiring resources in the non-profit venue.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BUS 110 - Business Law and Ethics

BUS 110 - Business Law and Ethics

3 credits
This course is designed to introduce the legal and regulatory environment in which businesses must operate, as well as the ethical considerations which are a part of the business environment. The rule of law, laws regarding property, public and private as well as civil and criminal law will be covered. State laws regarding incorporation, licensing, tax and regulatory filings and legal recourses to public acts will be discussed. Federal and State employment and labor laws will also be an important part of this course.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Summer

BUS 115 - Human Resource Management

BUS 115 - Human Resource Management

3 credits
This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of human resource management including recruiting, hiring, training and developing the workforce. In addition, issues of performance improvement, compensation and benefits, collective bargaining and labor relations and legal aspects of human resource management will be explored.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, or BUS 107
Offered: Spring, Summer

BUS 121 - Personal Finance & Insurance

BUS 121 - Personal Finance & Insurance

3 credits
This course presents an analysis of the many financial situations and decisions confronting an individual that will raise consumer awareness. Students learn the proper management of personal income and expenses. Additional topics include cost of credit, budgeting, and individual tax preparation. A focus on financial and retirement planning includes concepts of life, health, homeowners and auto insurance. Students also learn about the various financial products offered by banks, credit unions and financial institutions. Students become aware of the laws that effect them as employees or small business owners.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 098 or equivalent
Offered: Summer

BUS 125 - Sales and Service I: The Fundamentals

BUS 125 - Sales and Service I: The Fundamentals

3 credits
This course covers the fundamentals of sales and customer service. Students are introduced to the concepts of having a positive attitude, the importance of listening, communication styles and skills, the basic steps of the sales and the importance of quality service. They will understand the importance of developing and personal selling philosophy, understanding their product and developing a basic presentation strategy. Students will also learn the importance of ethics in selling.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

BUS 126 - Sales and Service II: Customer Focus

BUS 126 - Sales and Service II: Customer Focus

3 credits
This course will address the relationship between customer service and effective sales. Students will learn how to present products and services to their customers in a manner that meets their identified and unidentified needs. In addition, students will learn how customer satisfaction enhances sales success by cultivating satisfied and return customers. This course will address the importance of listening skills, understanding customer behavior, recognizing cultural diversity in the sales environment and methods of developing customer loyalty.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 125
Offered: Spring

BUS 132 - Budgeting and Planning

BUS 132 - Budgeting and Planning

3 credits
This course will provide an understanding of the budgeting process. Students will create a master budget and Pro Forma Financial Statements. Students will perform Horizontal and Vertical Analysis of these statements, interpret results and determine master budget variances. Students will also develop flexible budgets and determine which variances require investigation using management by exception. The importance of budgeting as a planning and decision making tool will also be stressed in this course.
Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for Collegiate Math, CAP110
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BUS 135 - Customer Relations in a Multi-cultural World

BUS 135 - Customer Relations in a Multi-cultural World

3 credits
This course takes an in-depth look at working with individuals, organizations, and communities that have varying forms of language and value systems. Students will examine personal cultural competencies, values, and communication approaches that are required for quality customer service. Strategies to understand and meet the customer's needs across cultures are discussed and analyzed.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 142 - Introduction to Property Management

BUS 142 - Introduction to Property Management

3 credits
This course provides a foundation in property management services and an exploration of investing in real estate. Students learn the process of developing a real estate/property management company which includes the duties of evaluating properties for investment; marketing properties; selecting tenants; contracting with owners, vetting tenants and vendors. Additionally, the role of a property manager's responsibilities and day to day duties are developed, which includes a knowledge of environmental and hazardous substance risks; the servicing and maintenance of properties; property accounting/bookkeeping and risk mitigation pertaining to property management. Students develop an understanding of fair housing and civil rights laws concerning property.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

BUS 146 - Green Technologies in Real Estate

BUS 146 - Green Technologies in Real Estate

3 credits
This course provides a foundation in facility and property management technologies with a concentration on the latest building techniques and products such as geo-thermal heating, HVAC, and solar. Students develop a knowledge of increasing energy and water efficiency, zero energy buildings; waste reduction strategies as well as demolition and waste requirements. Assessment of costs and return on investment of these technologies is stressed. Students become familiar with government regulations and other related technologies to inform the student of options in the development and maintenance of properties with an eco-friendly focus.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 142 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall

BUS 150 - Small Business and Entrepreneurship

BUS 150 - Small Business and Entrepreneurship

3 credits
This course will provide an introduction to exploring fundamental business principles with an emphasis on a practical approach to the entrepreneurial process and the skills for starting a small business. The course will include studying ethics, the global environment, forms of business ownership, starting a small business, an entrepreneur's acquisition of capital, small business management, networking, and managing financial resources. The course further explores issues with franchiseing and other business opportunities.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 210 - Business Planning and Development

BUS 210 - Business Planning and Development

3 credits
This course covers the aspects of creating a successful business plan. The foundations for each section of the business plan developed in this class will be enhanced through the knowledge gained in other courses. This class will provide an understanding of how all the pieces; the marketing plan, the financial plan, and organizational plans - integrate into the overall business plan. The plan created will provide a practical description of the future direction of the business.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, or BUS 107
Offered: Fall, Summer

BUS 212 - Grant Writing

BUS 212 - Grant Writing

3 credits
This course is designed to provide students with a general introduction to the field of grant writing. Instruction provides information on types of grants, common requirements of grant applications, and elements of a grant application. Students will learn to convey grant needs, assess resources, design a management plan, develop a budget, and conduct evaluations. Study in this course includes common grant applications, letters of inquiry, introductory letters, written contracts, formal reports and common correspondence. Students will learn how to search for grant availability and then develop an original grant application for a project or organization of their choice. Formerly listed as ENG 110. (Cross-referenced to ENG 212). CS comp
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BUS 215 - Marketing

BUS 215 - Marketing

3 credits
This course examines marketing principles, strategies, and methods practiced by modern businesses and organizations including product/service distribution, promotion, and pricing. Topics include evaluating market opportunities; buyer behavior; market segmentation, targeting, and positioning; market strategy and planning; development of marketing mix; and marketing organization and control. The role of ethics, corporate social responsibility, and public policy that are intrinsic to marketing efforts will also be explored.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BUS 218 - Event Management

BUS 218 - Event Management

3 credits
This course introduces the student to the underlying theoretical and practical foundations of event management. Students will learn about the historic roots of celebrations, and the four pillar approach to event leadership (time, finance, technology and human resources). Students will learn how to determine the target market and niche of an event and how the event connects to a company's strategic mission and goals. Case studies and hands on experience will further student knowledge and will promote the practice of successful event management.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101
Offered: Fall, Summer

BUS 226 - Sales and Service III: Advanced Strategies

BUS 226 - Sales and Service III: Advanced Strategies

3 credits
This advanced course will build on the fundamental of sales and customer service. It focuses on sales language, verbal visualization, mental visualization, listening skills, follow up and service, prospecting and using telephone skills to enhance sales success. Students will also develop strategies for dealing with difficult customers. The course will also help students to recognize different market segments and how to customize their sales approach to meet the needs and expectations of those various segments.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 126
Offered: Summer

BUS 230 - Workforce Planning and Staffing

BUS 230 - Workforce Planning and Staffing

3 credits
This advanced course will examine strategies for staffing the workplace. Students will study human resource processes used to recruit and retain a workforce that will enable an organization to meet its business objectives. The process of on-boarding through assessment of performance and then to career develop are examined in light of the strategic staffing requirements of an organization. Specific duties of developing job descriptions from job analysis, forecasting and managing work flow are emphasized.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring, Summer

BUS 240 - Current Topics in Management

BUS 240 - Current Topics in Management

3 credits
In this course, students will research, discuss, and analyze current trends and issues in management. A seminar in design, students will explore such contemporary topics as the role of leadership and management in organizations, work place bullying, and discrimination in the work place. Other "hot" topics include corporate social responsibility, pay equity and work-life balance.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BUS 242 - Financing Principles of Property

BUS 242 - Financing Principles of Property

3 credits
This course explores a variety of financing techniques concerning the acquisition or disposal of personal and commercial real estate. Students develop a working knowledge of primary and secondary mortgage markets and review loan programs. Consideration is also given to the various costs involved in property financing, including tax and insurance structures, and closing costs, document and process fees. Federal and state financing legislation is explored. The duties of the mortgagor are included as are strategies for avoiding the default of a mortgage. Maintaining relevant financial documents for business and tax purposes is also featured.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 142
Offered: Fall, Summer

BUS 246 - Principles and Practice of Real Estate

BUS 246 - Principles and Practice of Real Estate

3 credits
This course provides the student with all the skills necessary to buy and sell properties within the state and industry specific guidelines. Students will understand various principles of real estate such as real property, home ownership, agency, brokerage, buyer representation, interests, ownership and liens. Students will examine legal descriptions of properties and property titles; and differentiate among contracts, titles and leases. Students further learn to evaluate the quality of assessments and appraisals. Laws pertaining to fair housing and environmental issues are explored. Successful completion of this course prepares students to sit for state licensure as a real estate agent if that credential is desired.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 142 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Summer

BUS 250 - International Business

BUS 250 - International Business

3 credits
This course provides the theory and practice of international business including such topics as the global market place, the role of culture, ethics, and corporate social responsibility in international business. The course stresses the study of national trade policies, international monetary systems, managing international business, international marketing and international operations management. Students learn to access the global market for their small business enterprise.
Prerequisite(s): None
Offered: Spring

BUS 257 - Institutional Development and Fundraising

BUS 257 - Institutional Development and Fundraising

3 credits
This course explores both the art and science of successful revenue-building through the development of charitable contributions, grants and sponsorships. It examines the best practices in building sustainable non-profit organizations through smart development and fundraising. All facets of fundraising are addressed including the structuring of different types of gifts, endowments, capital giving campaigns, donor relations and special events. The processes for development are also examined including the use of technology and social networking to advance the sustainability of the organization. The management process of institutional development is also addressed along with the ethical implications of the profession.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 107 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 265 - Principles of Finance

BUS 265 - Principles of Finance

3 credits
The focus of this course is the fundamentals of sound financial management. Students will study the time value of money, risk/return analysis, cash flow management, the basics of capital budgeting, working capital management, financial forecasting, inventory management and basic financial ratios.
Prerequisite(s): C- or better in ACC 220
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 285 - Managerial Economics

BUS 285 - Managerial Economics

3 credits
This course covers the study of managerial decision-making using tools and principles of economic analysis. Topics such as production and cost; market structure; profit maximization; forecasting techniques; consumer behavior, and; business behavior will be stressed. Students will be expected to apply managerial economic principles in a course project.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101; ECN 110
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 289 - Independent Study

BUS 289 - Independent Study

3 credits
This course enables students to conduct an in-depth study/project within their major field of study under the direction of a faculty mentor. Students requesting an independent study must demonstrate good writing and synthesis abilities. For students already gainfully employed in their field of study, and after consultation with the business program director, this course may be substituted for the cooperative work assignment as the culminating experience for the program.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: By arrangement

BUS 299 - Cooperative Work Assignment

BUS 299 - Cooperative Work Assignment

4 credits
During a 180-hour cooperative assignment, students are provided with hands-on training and career related experience. This course provides extensive on-site experience which utilizes previously studied subjects and related skills. It gives the student the opportunity to put his/her class knowledge to practical use and to practice and enhance acquired skills. It provides the student with valuable employment experience, increasing their marketability.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of all required courses
Offered: By arrangement

BUS 305 - E-Business

BUS 305 - E-Business

3 credits
This course explores the conduct of commercial business through the use of the internet and associated technological innovations, as well as the controversies related to social constructs and business. This course helps students design e-commerce strategies based on models and concepts of contemporary e-commerce practices with an emphasis on business to business commerce and collaboration. It stresses the use of mobile devices and applications to extend and engage in electronic business transactions. Students develop the requisite skills to integrate e-business principle and practices into their business plans
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, BUS 215
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 310 - Targeted Marketing and Social Media

BUS 310 - Targeted Marketing and Social Media

3 credits
This course covers important aspects of online marketing in the social media age with emphasis on developing targeted marketing strategies using social media. Topics will include: search engine optimization; online advertising; pay-per-click advertising; e-mail marketing strategies; mobile marketing; online reputation management; web public relations, web development, and how social media works.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 330 - Operations Management

BUS 330 - Operations Management

3 credits
This course will lead the student through the concepts, principles, problems, and practices of operations management; an area of management focused on overseeing and designing business operations in the production of goods and services. Participants will examine best practices for the efficient use of resources to meet customer requirements and related activities including purchases, inventory control, quality control, storage, logistics and evaluation of the processes. Understanding the process that turns inputs (design, material and labor) into outputs (goods/services) is central to effective operations management. Participants will learn strategies for adding value to the process in consort with marketing activities.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, ECN 285
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 350 - Small Business Finance and Taxation

BUS 350 - Small Business Finance and Taxation

3 credits
This course will cover the various debt and equity financing sources available for new and existing small business ventures. The day to day financial decisions of a small business and the development of a financial plan to acquire various financing instruments will be discussed. Avoiding common mistakes in attempting to acquire funds will also be covered. Additionally, various filing options, tax entity, federal and state tax laws and payroll tax requirements of the federal and state governments will be stressed in this course. Tax implications of managerial decisions will also be discussed.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, BUS 265, ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 355 - Financial Management for Non-profit Institutions

BUS 355 - Financial Management for Non-profit Institutions

3 credits
This course will provide an overview of the skills required for financial planning and management of a nonprofit organization. Preparation and use of budgets and financial reports will be covered. Compliance with reporting requirements of government agencies and funding sources will also be addressed. Interpretation of financial reports and audit results will be discusses as well as how to safeguard assets, manage resources and ensure financial solvency with adequate cash flow.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, BUS 265, ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 389 - Independent Study

BUS 389 - Independent Study

3 - 6 credits
This course enables students to conduct an in-depth study/project within their major field of study under the direction of a faculty mentor. Students requesting an independent study must demonstrate good writing and synthesis abilities. Through a work or defined academic experience, students will demonstrate in-depth familiarity with related concepts and techniques appropriate to the business field while demonstrating a willingness to create outcomes with minimal direction from the instructor. Outcomes may be based upon material researched and/or experienced and appropriately documented to verify learning. Learning must be connected to legitimate business objectives.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: By arrangement

BUS 410 - Theory and Practice of Business Research

BUS 410 - Theory and Practice of Business Research

3 credits
This course brings the student through the research process as it applies to business. Participants learn the process of research in anticipation of entering the business arena or in preparation for advanced degree work. They explore the various research approaches and the review of existing literature. The foundations of research, from data collection to the measurement process and design, help students understand the factors behind business trends and conceptualize new possibilities for future trends and practices through the analysis of data. Reporting of research findings is also critical in the research process.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, ECN 285, ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 430 - Small Business in a Global Environment

BUS 430 - Small Business in a Global Environment

3 credits
This course explores the impact of economic issues of global significance on the small business economy. Students will examine financial events and trends in the U.S. national economy and in the local economy as they pertain to small business. Small business connections to the global economy are explored through the management of international supply-chain processes and how small business networks sell in the global market. Additionally, students will study how small businesses engage in the emerging markets as they adapt to the appropriate customs when doing business with an international client base. Legal, political, and economic issues related to conducting business across national boundaries will be stressed.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, BUS 310, ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 435 - Non-profit Auditing Procedures

BUS 435 - Non-profit Auditing Procedures

3 credits
This course will introduce auditing practices and procedures to non- profit management students. Policies and procedures will be analyzed to determine if they are in compliance with non-profit auditing standards. Focus of the course will be on the role of the auditing committee. Internal control, risk assessment, proper documentation and assurance of proper accounting are discussed.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 101, ACC 1XX, BUS 265, ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

BUS 490 - Capstone: Strategic Planning

BUS 490 - Capstone: Strategic Planning

3 credits
This is a capstone course in which students learn how business leaders formulate strategies for business that are global and dynamic. This course examines the process of developing vision for an organization and defining its goals in light of the organization's mission. Students will learn the process of strategic planning for long-term viability of an organization and the dynamics that drive the strategic planning process. Understanding the role each member plays of the organization plays in developing and executing a strategic plan is explained. Developing critical decision making skills are a focal element of this course. Students also practice the skills critical to this process through team projects, strategic plan case analysis, and oral and written reports.
Prerequisite(s): All core business courses
Offered: Fall, Spring

Back to the top


CAP

CAP 110 - Computer Applications

CAP 110 - Computer Applications

3 credits
This course is designed to enhance student knowledge, usage and skills with computers and Microsoft Office software. This is not compatible with MAC. This includes creating documents in Word, spreadsheets and charts in Excel , e-mail functions in Outlook and presentations in PowerPoint. Students will also learn about the world-wide web, Internet usage and the effects of social media on society. Formerly listed as CAP 100. CS cl
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CAP 230 - Database Applications

CAP 230 - Database Applications

3 credits
In this course, students will develop expertise using spreadsheets and databases to prepare to take the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification exam for Excel. In addition to reviewing basic Excel skills, students will learn how to apply advanced formulas and functions, create PivotTables, manage large worksheets and analyze data to solve business or scientific problems. Students will also learn how to manage an Access database table, create forms, run queries and design reports. Students will practice using the current Microsoft Office suite efficiently by integrating data from Word, PowerPoint, Access and Excel to create integrated business documents. CS cl
Prerequisite(s): CAP 110 OR Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Chemistry

CHEM 100 - Introduction to Chemistry

CHEM 100 - Introduction to Chemistry

3 credits
The course is a survey study of chemistry. Emphasis is laid on the aspects of general, organic, and biological chemistry. The course will provide basic information about the metric system, measurements, conversions, matter and energy, nuclear radiation, chemical reactions, solutions, gas laws, acids and bases, as well as general concepts of organic chemistry, and the major organic compound groups essential for life (carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins). This course does not fulfill the requirements for the Nursing and Respiratory Care programs. A
Prerequisite(s): MATH 099
Offered: Summer

CHEM 101 - Chemistry

CHEM 101 - Chemistry

4 credits
This course is a survey study of chemistry. Emphasis is on the aspects of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry. These concepts will include interactions of matter and energy, nuclear radiation, measurement, chemical reactions, solutions, gas laws, acid and bases, as well as general concepts of organic chemistry, and the four major organic compound groups essential for life (Lipids, Carbohydrates, Proteins, and Nucleic Acids). Laboratory sessions are coordinated with the lectures and emphasize experimentation and application of the lecture content. A
Prerequisite(s): High school science with a lab and placement in ENG 101 and MATH 125 or higher, or completion of SCI 110 and placement in ENG 101 and MATH 125 or higher
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CHEM 110 - General Chemistry I

CHEM 110 - General Chemistry I

4 credits
The first semester of a two semester sequence that is an introduction to fundamentals and principles of chemistry including, but not limited to: atomic and molecular structure, measurement, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter, chemical reactions, kinetic molecular theory, chemical thermodynamics and chemical equilibrium. A
Prerequisite(s): High school science with a lab and placement in ENG 101 and MATH 125 or higher, or completion of SCI 110 and placement in ENG 101 and MATH 125 or higher
Offered: Fall

CHEM 111 - General Chemistry II

CHEM 111 - General Chemistry II

4 credits
The second semester of a two semester sequence that is an introduction to fundamentals and principles of chemistry including, but not limited to: intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, acid-base equilibria, thermodynamics, redox reactions, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. A
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 110
Offered: Spring

Back to the top


Criminal Justice

CJS 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice and the Law

CJS 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice and the Law

3 credits
This course provides a general introduction to the Criminal Justice system and the career opportunities that exist in this field. In addition students will be presented with an overview of the history, purposes, and effectiveness of Federal and State criminal law the various aspects of criminal justice. Topics include identification of the elements of a crime and an examination of specific types of crimes and their assigned penalties.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CJS 106 - Investigative Report Writing

CJS 106 - Investigative Report Writing

3 credits
This course combines the basics of two disciplines—investigation and report writing, and bridges the gap between them in order to teach the basics involved in writing an investigative report. Fundamental guidelines for investigative reports are established through a set of rules that are easy to understand and apply in any type of report writing scenario. Topics include note taking, describing persons and property, crime and arrest reports, search warrants, and issues in writing. (cross-referenced as HSM 106) comp
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring

CJS 111 - Contemporary Issues in Crime and Prevention

CJS 111 - Contemporary Issues in Crime and Prevention

3 credits
This course will examine the cause and effect relationship between contemporary problems in our society and how they relate to crime and prevention. Issue such as substance abuse, domestic violence, DNA testing, the ACLU and the widespread use of the Internet will be discussed in their relation to the criminal justice system and Homeland Security. (Cross-referenced to HSM 111)
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

CJS 112 - Criminal Procedures

CJS 112 - Criminal Procedures

3 credits
This course presents an in-depth look at the United States Constitution as it relates to the rights of victims and offenders. Due process and the procedures to protect guaranteed rights within the criminal justice system are examined.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

CJS 115 - Principles of Criminal Investigation

CJS 115 - Principles of Criminal Investigation

3 credits
This course examines the investigative process from the initial introduction at the crime scene to the in-court testimony describing the investigation as well as an in-depth study of crime scene procedures including recognition, protection, documentation, and collection of physical evidence; scene documentation, scene search procedures; and reconstructions from evidence and scene pattern.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

CJS 125 - Introduction to Law Enforcement

CJS 125 - Introduction to Law Enforcement

3 credits
This course presents an overview of law enforcement as a profession. Topics will include: patrol operations, ethics and deviance, civil liability, police-community relations and personnel systems. Students will be exposed to the fundamental aspects and current trends in law enforcement.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

CJS 130 - Introduction to Computer Crimes and Security

CJS 130 - Introduction to Computer Crimes and Security

3 credits
This course offers an introduction to information systems used within the national security system. A framework is provided for understanding the needs, types, capabilities and applications of management information systems. An overview of existing security information systems is presented with implications for the future requirements. This course will provide an overview of computer crime and the procedures forensic computing specialists, law enforcement investigators, and prosecutors must invoke to prosecute computer criminals successfully. Finally, the impact of science and technology upon security agencies and how information management systems will prepare for the latest challenges will also be analyzed and discussed. (Cross-referenced to HSM 130)
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

CJS 131 - Data and Information System Security Protection

CJS 131 - Data and Information System Security Protection

3 credits
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to computer security, including computer networks, issues, concepts and technologies. The core technologies of access control, cryptography, digital signatures, authentication, network firewalls and network security services and programs are reviewed. Issues of security policy and risk management are considered. (Cross-referenced to HSM 131)
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

CJS 132 - Forensic Science

CJS 132 - Forensic Science

3 credits
This course is an introduction to forensic science. Students will have hands-on exposure to crime scene investigation and evidence preparation. Topics will include: fingerprinting, document evidence, blood splatter, firearm evidence and arson evidence.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

CJS 135 - Forensic Photography

CJS 135 - Forensic Photography

3 credits
This course is an introduction to the basic principles, equipment and techniques of forensic photography. Students will learn the importance of photography and how it is used to document, preserve, and identify evidence. Students will develop skills through practical experiences. Emphasis will given to skills pertaining to photographing a crime scene and specific areas of a crime scene, such as fingerprints, blood splatter, firearms, people and vehicles.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

CJS 140 - Introduction to Corrections

CJS 140 - Introduction to Corrections

3 credits
This course examines the nature and application of corrections and punishment and provides an overview of criminological, historical, legal, and policy-oriented works. This course discusses the foundations of corrections and relates them to contemporary correctional issues. This course encourages critical thinking about the future direction corrections should take.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

CJS 150 - Criminology

CJS 150 - Criminology

3 credits
This course places special focus on contemporary areas and issues such as feminist theories and feminist criminology; biological and genetic theories of criminal behavior; violence in the media; family assault and its criminalization; crimes of violence against women in America and abroad; mass murder in the United States; school violence and shootings; hate crimes and terrorism in America. Society's response to crime is covered and addresses the question of how security & freedom interface in an age of increasing globalism.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

CJS 210 - Criminal Law

CJS 210 - Criminal Law

3 credits
This course provides students with an introduction to the theory, history and purposes of statutory law. Topics will include major elements of statutory and common law offenses. The Federal and State penal code will be discussed.
Prerequisite(s): CJS 101
Offered: Fall

CJS 220 - Victimology

CJS 220 - Victimology

3 credits
This course presents an overview of victimization, to include patterns of victimization. Topics will include victimization and the victim's perspective on crime, its causes and effects. Students will be exposed to the consequences and roles of the victim in today's criminal justice system.
Prerequisite(s): CJS 101
Offered: Summer

CJS 225 - Basics of Interview and Interrogation Techniques

CJS 225 - Basics of Interview and Interrogation Techniques

3 credits
Students will be provided the study of basic principles of all types of investigations utilized in the criminal justice system. There will be an introduction to specific knowledge in handling crime scenes, interviews, evidence, surveillance, follow-up, technical resources and case preparation.
Prerequisite(s): CJS 101
Offered: Fall

CJS 230 - Cyber Crime: Identity Theft and Internet Vulnerabilities

CJS 230 - Cyber Crime: Identity Theft and Internet Vulnerabilities

3 credits
This course will introduce and discuss the fastest growing crime - theft of a person's identity, the techniques and various ways criminals use to steal personal information. Prevention and ways to protect one's identity will be discussed. This course will also focus on the theories and techniques for tracking attackers across the Internet and gaining forensic information from computer systems. This course includes case studies of Internet-based computer crimes and addresses limits of forensic techniques. (Cross-referenced to HSM 230)
Prerequisite(s): CJS/HSM 130 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Spring

CJS 231 - Information System Threats/Attacks/Defense

CJS 231 - Information System Threats/Attacks/Defense

3 credits
This course provides an overview of the actors, motives and methods used in the commission of computer-related crimes and describes the methods used by organizations to prevent, detect, and respond to these crimes. (Cross-referenced to HSM 231)
Prerequisite(s): CJS/HSM 130 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Summer

CJS 232 - Computer Crime Forensics and Investigative Procedures

CJS 232 - Computer Crime Forensics and Investigative Procedures

3 credits
This course presents an introduction to modern criminalistics and investigative techniques to solve crimes. The course includes an examination and evaluation of crime scenes with scientific analysis of physical evidence. Individual and group activities relating to professional practices of forensic science and computer science will be explored throughout the semester. (Cross-referenced to HSM 232)
Prerequisite(s): CJS 130 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Spring

CJS 235 - Principals of Personal and Physical Security

CJS 235 - Principals of Personal and Physical Security

3 credits
This course will provide the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of personal and physical security to include the definitions, the need, the requirements, and review of the controls, techniques and tools. This course introduces participants to a broad, in-depth look at security planning and procedures. Students will develop skills in intelligence collection, surveillances, perimeter and crime scene security, principles of crowd and riot control, substance abuse recognition, theft, sabotage, and espionage. Additional topics may include computer security, electronic criminal investigations, firewalls and security software, as well as crime prevention techniques. (Cross-referenced to HSM 235)
Prerequisite(s): CJS 101
Offered: Spring

CJS 242 - Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections in the United States

CJS 242 - Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections in the United States

3 credits
This course offers a comprehensive look at the probation and parole process. It includes discussion of offender needs and risks, a variety of supervision programs, inmate re-entry issues and solutions, and theories of crime and rehabilitation. controversial issues are addressed and capture the conflict between the need to maximize community safety and the need to control the cost of operating prisons. Additional attention is paid to both the juvenile and adult populations and the book considers how the probation officers work with each.
Prerequisite(s): CJS 101
Offered: Fall

CJS 243 - Juvenile Justice in America

CJS 243 - Juvenile Justice in America

3 credits
Students will focus on the important issues, emerging trends, contemporary research, and special challenges facing juvenile justice today. This comprehensive exploration of the American juvenile justice system covers the history and philosophy of juvenile justice, the current practices for processing youthful offenders, the detention of juveniles, and the diversion of youth from the juvenile justice system. This course gives students an "up-close and personal" view of the fascinating and sometimes tragic world of the juvenile offender–and the personal, psychological and thinking processes that characterize juvenile misbehavior.
Prerequisite(s): CJS 101
Offered: Spring

CJS 250 - Service Learning Project

CJS 250 - Service Learning Project

3 credits
This course combines learning objectives with service objectives. Students will be actively involved in a community oriented service provider with an emphasis on providers related to the criminal justice field. Students will develop skills and knowledge in a learning environment and apply them to real-life situations. This course extends the learning beyond the traditional classroom and brings the students into the community. Transportation to internship sites is the responsibility of the student.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Spring

CJS 260 - Constitutional Law

CJS 260 - Constitutional Law

3 credits
This course provides students with the basic principles of due process, as defined by the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. Students will review landmark decisions from the U. S. Supreme Court and their impact on the criminal justice system throughout history.
Prerequisite(s): CJS 101
Offered: Summer

CJS 290 - Research Project in Criminal Justice

CJS 290 - Research Project in Criminal Justice

3 credits
This course will require the student to identity an acceptable topic in Public Safety, to conduct extensive research involving the identified thesis and result in a validated conclusion. With the instructor's approval, students may work individually or in small groups toward completion and presentation of the project.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and Departmental Permission
Offered: By Arrangement

CJS 299 - Internship

CJS 299 - Internship

3 credits
This course provides a supervised internship of at least 150 hours in order to gain practical field placement experience in the homeland security area including law enforcement, fire service, corrections, public/private sector safety or security, protective services environments, or other Public Safety areas. Transportation to internship sites is the responsibility of the student.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Communications

COM 101 - Public Speaking

COM 101 - Public Speaking

3 credits
This course is designed to develop public speaking and listening skills so that students may become more effective communicators. Students will learn research techniques; and how to organize, deliver, and adapt their message to an audience. They prepare and deliver several major speeches. Students also apply interviewing and group discussion techniques. CS comm
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

COM 105 - Interpersonal Communications

COM 105 - Interpersonal Communications

3 credits
This course introduces students to effective communications in work settings. Topics include communicating in one-on-one conversations; participating in and leading meetings; creating e-mail, phone, social media, and written communications; making presentations; and resolving conflicts. Students learn how to be active listeners, interpret body language, tailor communications to different audiences, and other skills. CS comm
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Dental Hygiene

DHP 102 - Periodontology

DHP 102 - Periodontology

3 credits
Emphasis on the study of normal and diseased periodontium; from client assessment, etiology and pathology to therapeutic treatment; provides fundamental information of periodontal anatomy, immunology and pathogenesis of the periodontal diseases, and an introduction to modern rational periodontal therapy, including preventive, nonsurgical, and surgical methods.
Prerequisite(s): DHP 104 Head/Neck Anatomy/Embryology, DHP 105 Radiology, DHP 110 Principles of Dental Hygiene I, DHP 202 Nutrition
Co-Requisite(s): DHP 120 Principles of Dental Hygiene II
Offered:

DHP 103 - Dental Materials

DHP 103 - Dental Materials

3 credits
This course is the study of dental materials used in the dental office and their relationship to the oral environment. The student will be introduced to the terminology, properties, and proper techniques of managing and selecting dental materials. This course incorporates a laboratory component to include hands-on laboratory experiences understanding of the physical and chemical properties of materials.
Prerequisite(s): DHP 105 Radiology, DHP 104 Head/Neck Anatomy/Embryology, DHP 110/120 Principles of Dental Hygiene I/II, DHP 202 Nutrition
Co-Requisite(s): DHP 106 Pharmacology/Pain Management
Offered: Fall

DHP 104 - Head and Neck Anatomy and Embryology

DHP 104 - Head and Neck Anatomy and Embryology

4 credits
This course is the study of anatomic structures of the head and neck region, including embryological and histological foundations of each of the structures. Additionally this course covers tooth anatomy and development.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to Dental Hygiene Program
Co-Requisite(s):DHP 105 Radiology
Offered:

DHP 105 - Radiology

DHP 105 - Radiology

3 credits

Dental Radiology lectures along with the laboratory experience will focus on the introduction and development of technical skills in exposing, processing and mounting digital and film radiographs. Students will develop and perfect intra and extra oral exposure technics, working with dental manikins. Based on the scope of practice the student will utilize critical thinking and evidenced-based decision making skills that will guide them through dental hygiene care.

This course is designed to include a major online component. Assignments, lectures, practice tests, simulations, and discussion will be held online. Time spent in laboratory will be on practice, in-class discussion, knowledge evaluation and group work.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Dental Hygiene
C0-Requisite(s):DHP 104 Head/Neck Anatomy/Embryology
Offered:

DHP 106 - Pharmacology and Pain Management

DHP 106 - Pharmacology and Pain Management

4 credits

The pharmacology segment of this course will provide the student with basic pharmacology knowledge as it pertains to the practice dental hygiene. The course will guide students to effectively communicate with patients, dentist and other medical professionals regarding medications commonly used in a dental office or medications frequently taken by patients.

The pain management segment of this course will provide students with the academic and practical aspects of administration of pain control techniques and local anesthesia. The students will understand the general principles and the indications for administering anesthesia. The laboratory section will expose students to the application of pain management and anxiety for dental patients.


Prerequisite(s): DHP 104 Head/Neck Anatomy/Embryology, DHP 110/120 Principles of Dental Hygiene I,II
Co-Requisite(s):DHP 103 Dental Materials
Offered:

DHP 110 - Principles of Dental Hygiene I

DHP 110 - Principles of Dental Hygiene I

4 credits

The Principles of Dental Hygiene lectures along with laboratory experience will focus on dental hygiene theory and practice that will provide the student with the necessary knowledge to develop a patient centered process of care. Students will be able to assess, and diagnose a patients’ oral and dental status, then plan, implement and evaluate an appropriate treatment strategy. Based on the scope of practice the student will utilize critical thinking and evidenced-based decision making skills that will guide them through dental hygiene care.

This course is designed to include a major online component. Assignments, lectures, practice tests, simulations, and discussion will be held online. Time spent in laboratory will be on instrumentation practice, in-class discussion, and group work.

The laboratory sessions of this course will consist of exercises that coordinate with the reading assignments and lectures. The students will first be introduced to the exercises by the faculty members demonstrating the processes and discussing the purposes for the steps to be followed during the exercises. The students will then practice the exercises until a lab practical examination is given to test the student’s proficiency and level of competence. It is suggested that each student use the practice time wisely as the course faculty members will be available during that time for guidance and assistance. The practical examinations will be given randomly.

Prerequisite(s): DHP 104 Head/Neck and DHP 105 Radiology
Co-Requisite(s):DHP 202 Nutrition
Offered:

DHP 113 - General and Oral Pathology

DHP 113 - General and Oral Pathology

3 credits
This course will study the fundamentals of the disease process in the human body, underlining the oral cavity and surrounding areas, and analyzing the aspects of prevention, recognition, and treatment; including the causes of inflammation and healing; developmental disturbances; pathology of dental caries; dental and oral abnormalities; and oral injuries. Premalignant lesions and their differences from common benign conditions are emphasized.
Prerequisite(s): DHP 102 Periodontology, DHP 103 Dental Materials, DHP 105 Radiology, DHP 106 Pharmacology/Pain Management, DHP 110/120 Principles of Dental Hygiene I/ II, DHP 202 Nutrition,
Co-Requisites:DHP 210 Principles of Dental Hygiene III, 201 Community/ Public Health
Offered:

DHP 120 - Principles of Dental Hygiene II

DHP 120 - Principles of Dental Hygiene II

4 credits

The Principles of Dental Hygiene II lectures along with clinic experience continues to focus on dental hygiene theory and practice that will provide the student with the necessary knowledge to develop a patient centered process of care. Students will be able to assess, and identify patients’ oral and dental status, followed by developing a treatment plan, implementing treatment and evaluate results. Based on the scope of practice the student will utilize critical thinking and evidenced-based decision making skills that will guide them through dental hygiene care. Skills introduced in DHP I will be reinforced. Discussion about calculus, dental stains, stain removal, dental charting and the dental hygiene care plan will also be discussed as they relate to patient care and dental hygiene treatment planning. Instruction in periodontal debridement/scaling instruments continues to improve instrumentation skills. Topics will include, but limited to, periodontal conditions and therapy, advanced instrumentation techniques, dental implants and treatment to special needs patients, the dental hygiene process of care and treatment planning and patient management, sharps stick protocols, OSHA and CDC guidelines and emergencies.

This course is designed to include a major online component. Assignments, lectures, practice tests, simulations, and discussion will be held online. Time spent in clinic will be on instrumentation practice and patient care.

The clinic sessions of this course will consist of exercises that coordinate with the reading assignments and lectures.

Prerequisite(s):DHP 104 Head/Neck Anatomy/Embryology, DHP 105 Radiology, DHP 110 Principles of Dental Hygiene I, DHP 202 Nutrition
Co-Requisites:DHP 102 Periodontology
Offered:

DHP 200 - Dental Hygiene Seminar

DHP 200 - Dental Hygiene Seminar

1 credits

The course is designed to assists the dental hygiene student in preparation for their dental hygiene boards. The course will help student to become familiar with the format used in the National Board Examination. Students also will have the opportunity to supplement and review their existing knowledge acquired throughout the academic curriculum. Portion of the course will be dedicated simulated National Board Examination. Comprehensive on-demand module on test taking strategies and methods to further develop and enhance dental hygiene critical thinking skills.

Prerequisite(s):DHP 102 Periodontology, DHP 103 Dental Materials, DHP 105 Radiology, DHP 106 Pharmacology/Pain Management, DHP 110/120 Principles of Dental Hygiene I/ II, DHP 202 Nutrition, DHP 210 Principles of Dental Hygiene III, 201 Community/ Public Health
Co-Requisites:DHP 220 Principles of Dental Hygiene IV
Offered:

DHP 201 - Community and Public Health Dentistry

DHP 201 - Community and Public Health Dentistry

4 credits

Introduction to the concepts of public health and issues in health care delivery, with emphasis on access to dental care and the role of the dental hygienist in the promotion of oral health, as well as, prevention of dental diseases in the community. Students are introduced to the principles of research methodology and biostatistics, epidemiological indices, population needs, and community health planning methods for dental education of the public. Through this course students will acquire knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviors necessary for the promotion of dental health and prevention of disease through community based dental health programs. The student will have the opportunity to interact with a diversified community performing preventive dental services.

Prerequisite(s):DHP 110/120, 210 Principles of Dental Hygiene I, II, III
Co-Requisites:DHP 220 Principles of Dental Hygiene IV
Offered:

DHP 202 - Nutrition

DHP 202 - Nutrition

3 credits

Fundamentals of nutrition with an emphasis on the relationship of diet and dental health combined with Lipids, Carbohydrates, Proteins, and Nucleic Acids. The application of this knowledge is in the form of nutritional counseling of patients who wish to prevent or control nutritionally-related oral health problems.

Prerequisite(s):Admission to Dental Hygiene and Chemistry
Co-Requisites:DHP 110 Principles of Dental Hygiene
Offered:

DHP 210 - Principles of Dental Hygiene III

DHP 210 - Principles of Dental Hygiene III

5 credits

Principles of Dental Hygiene III will enhance clinical techniques and skills, technology and current procedural practices of the dental hygienist with emphasis on self-evaluation, excellence and quality assurance. Students will also gain knowledge about ethics in the professional clinical setting. This course continues clinical development skills necessary to perform dental hygiene care including the principles learned in DHP110 and DHP 120 course work. Implementation of case studies will provide insights into the complex issues of patient care and to stimulate critical thinking.

This course is designed to include a major online component. Assignments, lectures, practice tests, simulations, and discussion will be held online. Time spent in clinic will be dedicated to patient care.

Prerequisite(s):Admission to Dental Hygiene and Chemistry
Co-Requisites:DHP 110 Principles of Dental Hygiene
Offered:

DHP 220 - Principles of Dental Hygiene IV

DHP 220 - Principles of Dental Hygiene IV

5 credits

This course permits refinement of clinical techniques and skills, technology and current procedural practices of the dental hygienist with emphasis on self-evaluation, excellence and quality assurance. Students will also gain knowledge about ethics in the professional clinical setting. This course continues clinical development skills necessary to perform dental hygiene care including the principles learned in previous course work; continuance of special needs patients incorporated in case studies. Emphasis is placed on case studies to provide insights into the complex issues of patient care and to stimulate critical thinking.

This course is designed to include a major online component. Assignments, lectures, practice tests, simulations, and discussion will be held online. Time spent in clinic will be dedicated to patient care.

Prerequisite(s):DHP 102 Periodontology, DHP 103 Dental Materials, DHP 105 Radiology, DHP 106 Pharmacology/Pain Management, DHP 110/120 Principles of Dental Hygiene I/ II, DHP 202 Nutrition
Co-Requisites:DHP 113 Gen/Oral Pathology, 201 Community/ Public Health
Offered:

Back to the top


Early Childhood Education

ECE 101 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education

ECE 101 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education

3 credits
This course is designed to acquaint students with the field of early childhood education. Students will be introduced to the history and philosophy of early childhood educators and programs that have laid the foundation of early childhood education and curriculum development. Students will have an understanding of social and psychological factors that influence a child overall. This course will provide students with an introductory understanding of how to develop a daily schedule in order to run an effective classroom. It emphasizes practical information that can be used in working with young children. It will help the student become aware of teacher's responsibilities and the importance of accountability. Students will learn how to observe children and write goals and objectives. They will also learn ways that are effective in working with other early childhood professionals in the day to day running of an effective program. Students will study the family and understand the importance of making connections to family members. Modern development, research, administration, curriculum, and trends in early childhood education will be covered. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments.
Prerequisite(s): successful completion of ENG 099 & MATH 099 or equivalent or CO-REQUISITE ENG 099 & MATH 099
Offered: Fall

ECE 102 - Health, Safety and Nutrition for Early Childhood Programs

ECE 102 - Health, Safety and Nutrition for Early Childhood Programs

3 credits
This course introduces students to the licensing and NAEYC requirements for creating healthy and safe environments. This course provides guidelines for establishing safe environments, room arrangement, accident prevention procedures, and sanitation guidelines. Students will examine the liability issues in childcare. his course provides objectives for developing health policies, controlling disease, solving ethical dilemmas related to health and safety, establishing proper nutrition, and responding to children's special health concerns. This course will examine legal and state guidelines governing licensed childcare programs. Students will explore ways to incorporate cooking activities into curriculum and create warm friendly settings for positive mealtime experiences. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments.arch, administration, curriculum, and trends in early childhood education will be covered. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments.
Prerequisite(s): successful completion of ENG 099 & MATH 099 or equivalent or CO-REQUISITE ENG 099 & MATH 099
Offered: Spring

ECE 110 - Creativity and the Young Child

ECE 110 - Creativity and the Young Child

3 credits
This course is designed for students to become aware of the importance of creativity in the early childhood classroom and be able to design and implement activities in the classroom to foster this development. Students will review theories of early childhood education and determine how these theories relate to creativity development. Students will explore music and movement, art, sand and water, blocks, dramatic play, and more as they plan developmentally-appropriate activities for young children. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

ECE 120 - Math and Science for Young Children

ECE 120 - Math and Science for Young Children

3 credits
This course is designed for students to develop an understanding of early math and science concepts. Students will explore and develop materials that can be used throughout the early childhood environment. Students will become familiar with the CT. Framework and the goals and objectives related to early math and science development. Students will design developmentally-appropriate math and science explorations for young children. Students will also explore developmentally-appropriate materials and literature for young children that foster early math and science skills and discuss the importance of the teacher as facilitator. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

ECE 140 - Early Childhood Practicum I

ECE 140 - Early Childhood Practicum I

6 credits
This course serves as a practical 240 hours of field experience that is based on the theories and learning outcomes associated with the overall Early Childhood curricula. Students will engage in project-based learning within an actual early childhood classroom that allows further exploration of professional work associated in early childhood. The course will integrate experiential learning, supervision, and reflection as students engage in defined projects within the work setting. This course will provide opportunities to practice early childhood theories, strategies, and techniques under the supervision of early childhood teachers, directors, and the instructor. It will also provide students the opportunity to return to the classroom in a seminar to discuss and evaluate their experiences. This class will enable students to learn effective methods of working in an early childhood setting. In this course, students will begin coursework towards their CDA resource file. Formerly listed as ECE 210. Not open to students who have complete ECE 210.
Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 or ECE 102
Offered: Fall

ECE 141 - Early Childhood Practicum II

ECE 141 - Early Childhood Practicum II

6 credits
This course serves as a continuation of the practical 240 hours of field experience learned in Early Childhood Practicum I. Students will continue to engage in project-based learning within an actual early childhood classroom that allows further exploration of professional work associated with early childhood. The course will again integrate experiential-learning, supervision, and reflection as students engage in defined projects within the work setting. This course will provide opportunities to practice early childhood theories, strategies, and techniques under the supervision of early childhood teachers, directors, and the instructor. It will enable students to learn effective methods of working in an early childhood setting. Students will be required to attend three seminars to discuss and evaluate their experiences. Students will complete their resource file for CDA at the culmination of this course.
Prerequisite(s): ECE 140
Offered: S

ECE 201 - The Exceptional Child and Learner

ECE 201 - The Exceptional Child and Learner

3 credits
This course focuses on working with exceptional students, including children who are gifted and talented and those who require special education. Students will learn methods for identifying, planning for and working effectively with such children in a regular classroom. Students will become familiar with various materials and how to adapt materials so that they are effective with working with the exceptional learner. Formerly listed as EDU 121 and ECE 201. Not open to students who have completed EDU 121 or ECE 201. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

ECE 210 - Observation and Assessment in the Early Childhood Classroom

ECE 210 - Observation and Assessment in the Early Childhood Classroom

3 credits
This course is designed for students to develop an understanding of the process and importance of observation and assessment of classroom environments, young children, and of teacher performance. Students will learn how to take appropriate observation notes and explore a variety of methods for collecting and analyzing this data. Students will learn how to create individual portfolios for young children and explore how to use the information contained in these portfolios for individual and group curriculum planning. Students will visit programs and use observation tools presented in class to assess the quality of the assigned early childhood environment. Students will practice using information to develop appropriate action plans and next steps as part of the evaluation process. Four 4- hour visits are required.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

ECE 220 - Multicultural Aspects of Early Childhood

ECE 220 - Multicultural Aspects of Early Childhood

3 credits
This course introduces multicultural theory as it relates to the early childhood classroom. Students will explore various pioneers in this field including Sonia Nieto and James Banks. Students will create activities that encourage acceptance and promote an anti-bias climate in the classroom. Students will explore programs that have implemented various anti-bias approaches in their classrooms. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments. mc
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

ECE 221 - Social and Emotional Development in Young Children

ECE 221 - Social and Emotional Development in Young Children

3 credits
This course is designed for students to gain knowledge and understanding of social-emotional development in young children, ages birth-age 8. Students will explore attachment theory as it relates to children's development and examine how children develop socially throughout early childhood. Creating supportive environments, building relationships, facilitating transitions, and identifying children's feelings will be examined during this course. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments. Formally listed as Social and Emotional Development for Young Children.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

ECE 231 - Early Language and Literacy Development

ECE 231 - Early Language and Literacy Development

3 credits
This course introduces students to the language and literacy development of children from birth-age 8. Students will examine the importance of adult interaction as a way to facilitate children's early literacy skills consisting of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will also explore the various components of language: oral, written, and nonverbal. Students will learn how to plan purposeful literacy activities in the classroom where children are active participants in their learning. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

ECE 251 - Student Teaching I

ECE 251 - Student Teaching I

3 credits
Students will participate in 113 hours of training at an approved early childhood site. Students will work closely with the mentoring teacher and assume appropriate responsibilities within the classroom. IN addition to the 113-hour classroom experience, students are required to attend a 3-hour per week seminar.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission and minimum CGPA of 2.0
Offered: Fall

ECE 252 - Student Teaching II

ECE 252 - Student Teaching II

3 credits
Student Teaching II is an extension of student Teaching I. In this course, students will work to complete their 112 hours of student teaching at their approved site. A student teaching experience is defined as direct involvement in a non-college classroom setting, sponsored by an institution of higher education, and jointly and cooperatively supervised agency and college personnel. Students will work closely with the mentoring teacher and assume appropriate responsibilities. In addition to the 112-hour training, students are required to attend a 3-hour weekly seminar. The completion of 112 hours and attendance at the seminars are required in order for successful completion of this course.
Prerequisite(s): Students must successfully complete ECE 251 with a C or better
Offered: Spring

ECE 270 - Supervision and Administration in Early Childhood Programs

ECE 270 - Supervision and Administration in Early Childhood Programs

3 credits
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to understand the importance and application of developmentally appropriate practices and examine the role and responsibilities of the early childhood administrator. This course will provide an overview of the policies, procedures, and leadership practices vital to the early childhood administrator's position. This course addresses planning for high quality child care and education facilities, including but not limited to staffing, financing, licensing, scheduling, policies, NAEYC accreditation, and organizing staff professional development.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer*

ECE 302 - Infant and Toddler Growth and Development

ECE 302 - Infant and Toddler Growth and Development

3 credits
This course is an in-depth study of the growth and development of young children from conception through three years old. Students will examine developmental milestones and educational theory. Students will have an opportunity to connect theory and developmental milestones to curriculum and environmental planning. Students will learn about various approaches to working with infants and toddlers such as the R.I.E. approach and responsive caregiving. This course will also focus the many ways in which to connect with the families of our youngest children. Students will examine the findings of current brain research that impact the work with infants and toddlers. (Cross-referenced to PSY 302)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 115
Offered: Spring*

ECE 303 - Infant and Toddler Methods and Techniques

ECE 303 - Infant and Toddler Methods and Techniques

3 credits
This course is designed to provide students with a solid theoretical foundation of infant and toddler development along with a practical application component for program and curriculum planning. Students will discuss typical and atypical development and plan for inclusive environments. Family involvement is vital to the quality of an infant toddler program and this course will provide students with ways in which to incorporate families into their programs. The ability to qualitatively observe very young children and gain valuable knowledge from observations is an important aspect of working with infants and toddlers. Thus, students will have extensive exposure to the observation process as well as to how to turn observations into curriculum and program planning.
Prerequisite(s):ENG 101 Suggested ECE 302
Offered: Fall - odd years only

ECE 304 - Infant and Toddler Assessment

ECE 304 - Infant and Toddler Assessments

4 credits
This course is designed for students to examine closely the development of infants and toddlers and to gain the ability to observe and assess infants and toddlers using a variety of methods. Students will use various screening and developmental tools (standardized, criterion-referenced and qualitative), in order to assess children’s developmental levels and determine needs. Students will need to work with typically and atypically developing infants and toddlers in order to complete this course. Fieldwork sites will be provided by the program. Students should plan to spend approximately 15 hours throughout the semester in a classroom with infants and toddlers.
Prerequisite(s):ECE 302
Offered: Spring

ECE 315 - Family-School-Community Partnerships

ECE 315 - Family-School-Community Partnerships

3 credits
This course explores the role of relationships between families, schools, and the communities in which families reside. Students will deepen their understanding of the importance of family involvement in the school system and examine creative strategies for including parents and families in the school. Students will also analyze contemporary family patterns and composition in order to more effectively connect with the families in their communities. Students will recognize that children are highly impacted by the environments in which they live. Topics in social studies will be explored as students have opportunities to discuss the importance of involving community partners, culture and diversity in the school system. Major theorists will be studied. This course also includes a 20-hour community volunteer project of the student's choice. (Cross-referenced to SOC 315)
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall

ECE 320 - Technology and Education

ECE 320 - Technology and Education

3 credits
This course is designed to familiarize students with the technology possibilities in education. Students will identify and locate educational technology options and evaluate their efficiency and purpose. Students will design classroom curriculum where technology is an essential component for both the teacher and the children. Students will have opportunities to observe the use of technology in education programs and will also have opportunities to use technology themselves in various programs. Students will become familiar with the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) as developed by the International Society for Technology Education (ITSE). Students should have access to Microsoft Office and media player to be successful in this course.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Spring**

ECE 330 - Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood

ECE 330 - Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood

3 credits
This course was designed to expose students to the broad concepts involved in teaching social studies to young children. Social Studies encompass a wide array of topics that affect individual's lives, group dynamics and the community at large. It is imperative that early childhood teachers understand the numerous influences that impact social studies in the field of early childhood education. In this course, students will examine many topics, such as but not limited to, people, places and environments, culture, community and individual development. While grasping an understanding of how to plan for student learning and creating environments that will enhance children's knowledge of social studies concepts. This course requires an observation in an early childhood environment in order to complete assignments
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Summer**

ECE 340 - Exceptional Child II

ECE 340 - Exceptional Child II

3 credits
This course is designed to promote child development and learning by familiarizing students with the characteristics and needs of all exceptional learners. A continual introduction of terms and concepts within a more narrowly defined topic area with discussions of videos, case studies, and presentations of the review of related literature pertaining to exceptional children will be engaged. These activities will add to the emergence of terms and concepts associated with special education. The concept of Inclusion as a means of educating students with special needs will be deeply discussed and students will become familiar with the historical events and social reform that laid the background for this method of instruction. Students will have opportunities to ponder opposing viewpoints on special education issues. Students will investigate the use of drugs as a means of curbing inappropriate conduct of students with special needs and recognize symptoms, modify environments, and plan appropriately so that children can be successful. A large focus of this course will be on community outreach and family involvement. (Cross-referenced to PSY 340)
Prerequisite(s): ECE 201
Offered: Summer

ECE 350 - Supervision and Administration in Early Childhood Programs

ECE 350 - Supervision and Administration in Early Childhood Programs

3 credits
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to understand the importance and application of developmentally appropriate practices and examine the role and responsibilities of the early childhood administrator. The course utilizes national standards (NAEYC Program Standards and Accreditation Criteria) and the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct as the underlying framework for the best practice in the administrative realm. This course will explain and discuss the role of the administrator in private, public, and federally funded schools. It will address various program philosophies, comprehensive programs, methods of managing staff and program, regulations, facilities, and developing family and community partnerships. This course is designed to meet the requirement for the Connecticut Director's Credential as the introductory survey course. Formerly listed as ECE 270.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

ECE 370 - Leadership in Early Education

ECE 370 - Leadership in Early Education

3 credits
This course offers students the opportunity to expand their comprehension of leadership and what it means to be a leader and mentor within education. This course will provide in-depth knowledge and understanding of leadership and advocacy within early childhood education and beyond. The goal of this course is to encourage individual leadership development and to support and nurture each student in developing and achieving their personal leadership goals.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Spring**

ECE 402 - Children's Literature

ECE 402 - Children's Literature

3 credits
This course is designed to acquaint students with the variety of literature available to for young children. Criteria for selecting books will be reviewed as well as the most appropriate methods for selecting books for young children. Students will review the importance of building books into the classroom curriculum and have opportunities to create lesson plans linked to various forms of children's literature. This course requires a 5-hour volunteer experience.
Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 & ECE 231
Offered: Fall**

ECE 406 - Advanced Curriculum Planning

ECE 406 - Advanced Curriculum Planning

3 credits
This course is designed for those students who have a high interest in curriculum planning. This course concentrates on individualizing curriculum to meet the needs of all children in the classroom and on building a holistic and creative curriculum using the CT State grade level expectations for young children, the CT Preschool Curriculum and Assessment Frameworks and the Early Learning Guidelines for Infants and Toddlers. Students will explore methods of curriculum planning while focusing on the Reggio Emilia approach to young children's learning. The course is designed for students to develop an in-depth comprehension of the Cycle of Intentional Teaching and to be able to do so in a variety of early learning settings. Connecting environments with curriculum and providing evidence of their relationship to each other will be a primary focus in this course.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission only
Offered: Summer*

ECE 410 - Education Research

ECE 410 - Education Research

3 credits
This course was designed to familiarize students with research reports. Students will read, analyze and critique research reports The reports read will include experimental, descriptive, qualitative, and historical approaches. Students will learn how to write their own research report and collect the appropriate supporting data. Students will discuss the difference between qualitative and quantitative research and determine how each can be used as complementary approaches to educational research. r
Prerequisite(s): STAT 167
Offered: Fall

ECE 411 - Action Research Project

ECE 411 - Action Research Project

3 credits
This course concentrates on the details of social science research methods and is a continuation of Educational Research (ECE 410). It is designed to guide students through a step-by-step approach of action research using qualitative, comparative, and quantitative research designs and analysis methods. Students, having learned the language of research, various methods for conducting research and how to identify and synthesize research literature from Educational Research (ECE 410), will conduct a SHORT action research project during this course. Students will carry out a SHORT action research project completing a research question and justification, literature review, methods and findings/recommendations sections. Additionally, students will propose their research topic to the college’s Internal Review Board (IRB). This course will build on concepts covered in Educational Research (ECE 410) as well as from other previous course work.
Prerequisite(s): ECE 410- must have received a C- or better
Offered: Spring

ECE 430 - Ethical Trends and Issues in Early Education

ECE 430 - Ethical Trends and Issues in Early Education

3 credits
This course is designed for students to take a deeper look into the field of early childhood education. Students will examine current trends and laws impacting the profession. They will analyze circumstances concerning parents, communities, and schools and discuss the ethical responsibilities and legal aspects of these situations. Students will have opportunities to ponder where the field is headed and what implications it will have on the children in our care.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall*

ECE 450 - Child Study Capstone

ECE 450 - Child Study Capstone

6 credits
This course is designed for students to take a deeper look into the field of early childhood education. Students will examine current trends and laws impacting the profession. They will analyze circumstances concerning parents, communities, and schools and discuss the ethical responsibilities and legal aspects of these situations. Students will have opportunities to ponder where the field is headed and what implications it will have on the children in our care.
Prerequisite(s): 42 credits in child study and departmental permission. Minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0
Offered: Spring

Back to the top


Economics

ECN 101 - Macroeconomics

ECN 101 - Macroeconomics

3 credits
This course covers a broad range of macro-economic topics in American and global economies. Topics focus on aggregate economic activity including gross national and domestic product and national income, price levels and inflation, supply and demand, employment and unemployment, domestic savings and investment, fiscal and monetary policy, and international trade. G w
Prerequisite(s): MATH 098 or equivalent
Offered: Fall

ECN 102 - Microeconomics

ECN 102 - Microeconomics

3 credits
This course examines the segment of the economy which includes individual businesses or industries, individual consumers, and individual products. It will examine the production, allocation and distribution of goods and services in a world of scarce resources. The course will explore basic concepts of opportunity, cost, supply and demand, taxation, cost theory, perfect competition, monopoly and other types of market structures. G us
Prerequisite(s): MATH 098 or equivalent
Offered: Spring

ECN 110 - Principles of Economics

ECN 110 - Principles of Economics

3 credits
This course provides an introduction to macroeconomic and microeconomic fundamental principles. Supply and demand, market equilibrium, scarcity and choice, factors of production, unemployment and inflation, gross domestic product and its relationship to business cycles will be covered. Price ceilings, price floors, costs and profit maximization and market structures will also be stressed. Students will understand the influence of economic principles on the domestic and global business environment.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 098 or equivalent
Offered: Fall, Spring

Back to the top


EDU

EDU 122 - Instructional Skills and Strategies

EDU 122 - Instructional Skills and Strategies

3 credits
This course will demonstrate to students how the art and science of teaching come together in an effective classroom. Students will learn the methodology of instructional techniques, including observation, evaluation, and reporting skills. Students will be introduced to the elements of teaching, including educational goals and objectives, the components of an effective lesson plan, how to manage small and large group instruction and the techniques for observing and recording students' performance. This course provides guidelines for establishing safe environments, room arrangement, accident prevention procedures, and sanitation guidelines. Students will examine the liability issues associated with childcare. This course will provide objectives for developing health policies, controlling disease, establishing proper nutrition, and responding to children's special health concerns. Emphasis is placed on writing objectives, activities goals, program goals, lesson plans, and creating thematic ideas. This class will provide an up-to-date review of teacher planning, teaching methods, and assessments.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

EDU 240 - Building Language Arts for Elementary Classrooms

EDU 240 - Building Language Arts for Elementary Classrooms

3 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to topics and areas of instruction of a Language Arts curriculum for elementary-age children. Students will explore language acquisition theory and will gain experience in planning for children's development of such language skills as comprehension, vocabulary, and beginning reading and writing. Students will learn about the process of language acquisition for English Language Learners and how to plan appropriately for their learning.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

Back to the top


Paramedic

EMT-P 101 - Paramedic I

EMT-P 101 - Paramedic I

4 credits
This course introduces students to the world of advanced life support (ALS) emergency medical services (EMS), as well as provides the students with a more comprehensive view of EMS systems and careers. This course covers most of the national standard curriculum's "Preparatory" module and some of the "Operations" module. Additionally, this course introduces students to some advanced life support skills and seeks to lay the foundations required for students to develop advanced operational and clinical decision-making skills. A laboratory component provides students with an opportunity to practice and develop required competencies.
Prerequisite(s): none
Corequisite(s): BIO 108
Offered: Fall

EMT-P 102 - Paramedic II

EMT-P 102 - Paramedic II

4 credits
This course instructs students in the proper techniques for advanced patient assessment. After completing the assessment portion, students are introduced to advanced trauma care, reviewing concepts related to traumatic injury patterns, and paramedic trauma procedures. The course challenges students to refine their operational and clinical decision-making skills with an emphasis on clinical decision-making in trauma settings. The course covers the "Patient Assessment" and "Trauma" modules of the paramedic national curriculum, as well as one component of the "Special Considerations" module. A laboratory component provides students with an opportunity to practice and develop required competencies.
Prerequisite(s): EMT-P 101, EMT-P 110
Corequisite(s): BIO 109
Offered: Spring

EMT-P 103 - Paramedic III

EMT-P 103 - Paramedic III

4 credits
This course teaches students advanced pre-hospital care for medical emergencies. With a particular emphasis on assessments, recognition, and life-saving interventions for acute medical disorders, students will apply learned concepts and be challenged to refine their operational and clinical decision-making skills, with an emphasis on clinical decision-making in medical settings. This course covers the "Medical" module of the national standard curriculum. A laboratory component provides students with an opportunity to practice and develop required competencies.
Prerequisite(s): EMT-P 102
Offered: Summer

EMT-P 110 - Paramedic Clinical I

EMT-P 110 - Paramedic Clinical I

2 credits
The paramedic "clinicals" provide opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in their classroom and laboratory in a controlled clinical environment. The clinical courses provide a vital link between the classroom and real-world patients. Students work under the direct supervision of assigned clinical preceptors in a variety of settings, but primarily in the emergency department. Clinical experiences are taken concurrently with paramedic classroom work during respective semesters of the program. Students are required to spend 8 hours per week in the clinical setting.
Prerequisite(s): none
Corequisite(s): EMT-P 101
Offered: Fall

EMT-P 120 Paramedic Clinical II

EMT-P 120 Paramedic Clinical II

2 credits
The paramedic "clinicals" provide opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in their classroom and laboratory in a controlled clinical environment. The clinical courses provide a vital link between the classroom and real-world patients. Students work under the direct supervision of assigned clinical preceptors in a variety of settings, but primarily in the emergency department. Clinical experiences are taken concurrently with paramedic classroom work during respective semesters of the program. Students are required to spend 8 hours per week in the clinical setting.
Prerequisite(s): none
Corequisite(s): EMT-P 102
Offered: Spring

EMT-P 130 - Paramedic Clinical III

EMT-P 130 - Paramedic Clinical III

2 credits
The paramedic "clinicals" provide opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in their classroom and laboratory in a controlled clinical environment. The clinical courses provide a vital link between the classroom and real-world patients. Students work under the direct supervision of assigned clinical preceptors in a variety of settings, but primarily in the emergency department. Clinical experiences are taken concurrently with paramedic classroom work during respective semesters of the program. Students are required to spend 8 hours per week in the clinical setting.
Prerequisite(s): none
Corequisite(s): EMT-P 103
Offered: Summer

EMT-P 201 - Paramedic IV

EMT-P 201 - Paramedic IV

4 credits
This course is designed to refine the skills and knowledge of the advanced paramedic student. The course covers special situations and special populations the paramedic faces in the field. The course is designed to run concurrently with EMT-P 210-Field Internship, allowing students to take advantage of the opportunity to integrate their field experience with the classroom. This course covers the "Special Considerations" and portions of the "Operations" modules of the paramedic national standard curriculum. A laboratory component provides students with an opportunity to practice and develop required competencies.
Prerequisite(s): EMT-P 103
Corequisite(s): EMT-P 210
Offered: Fall

EMT-P 210 - Field Internship

EMT-P 210 - Field Internship

2 credits
This field internship provides students an opportunity to practice as entry-level paramedics under the direct supervision of approved field mentors. This course provides the opportunity for students to practice their skills and application of learned knowledge, while allowing for twice-weekly opportunities to share their experience with course faculty and peers, allowing for guided reflection, modification during practice and vicarious learning from peers.
Prerequisite(s): none
Corequisite(s): EMT-P 201
Offered: Fall

Back to the top


English

ENG 087 - Academic Reading and Writing

ENG 087 - Academic Reading and Writing

0 credits
This course is designed to prepare high intermediate and low advanced/transition-level non-native speakers of English for collegiate learning. Students will expand academic vocabulary, increase speed of comprehension, and become familiar with critical thinking strategies for analyzing and responding to academic texts. In writing, they will refine organizational skills, development of ideas, clarity and mechanics of effective academic writing. In addition, students will learn about various test-taking strategies and acquire knowledge of level-appropriate structures of English grammar. Class: 6 hours per week for 15 weeks. ESL Students Only.
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENG 088 - Foundations for College Reading and Writing

ENG 088 - Foundations for College Reading and Writing

0 credits
This course is designed to enhance students' competence in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in preparation for college-level assignments. Emphasis is on developing the cognitive strategies applicable to reading and writing as interactive processes. Students analyze a variety of readings through class discussions and written responses that focus on reading comprehension as well as on accurate sentence, paragraph and essay structure. The goal of this course is to provide enriched opportunities to improve reading comprehension, vocabulary, and fundamental writing skills. Note: Students must complete the GAP program by demonstrating competency by passing the final exam and earning an overall grade of C to move into ENG 089. Class: 6 hours per week for 15 weeks. GAP Students Only. Formerly listed as Reading Dynamics.
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENG 089 - Introduction to College Reading and Writing

ENG 089 - Introduction to College Reading and Writing

0 credits
This course is designed to enhance students' competence in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in preparation for college-level assignments. Emphasis is on applying cognitive strategies to the reading process as students analyze a variety of readings and rhetorical patterns through class discussions and written responses. Students utilize the writing process to develop accurate sentence, paragraph and essay structures in response to readings and assigned rhetorical patterns. The goal of this course is to engage students in developing analytical and interpretive reading and writing skills and mastering grammar, mechanical, and syntactical concepts of writing. Note: Students must complete the GAP program by demonstrating competency by passing the final exam and earning an overall grade of C to move into ENG 099. GAP Students Only. Formerly listed as Fundamentals of Reading and Writing.
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation or "C" or better in ENG 088
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENG 099 - Reading/Writing Connection

ENG 099 - Reading/Writing Connection

0 credits
This course builds on students' previous reading and writing practices through completion of sequence of critically reflective reading and writing assignments. Through this sequence, students develop multiple ways of interpreting texts, critically connecting ideas from one text to others as well as to their own experiences. The course focuses on the writing and editing process needed to shape the meaning of a text in order to meet readers' expectations and to enhance students' fluency with academic writing conventions. Varied reading samples are used for class discussion and written responses. Note: Students must earn a grade of C or better to take ENG 101.
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation or "C" or better in ENG 089
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENG 101 - English Composition

ENG 101 - English Composition

3 credits
This course is designed to develop clear and effective college-level writing. Emphasis on the composing process including topic selection, drafting, editing, and proofreading of final drafts. Focus is on organization of ideas, effective sentence and paragraph structure, grammar and usage. Students will learn the techniques for writing major essays and research papers. CS comp
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation or "C" or better in ENG 099
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENG 102 - Composition and Literature

ENG 102 - Composition and Literature

3 credits
This course provides additional composition skill-building. Students are required to write extensively on topics related to various genres of serious literature and are expected to explain and support their ideas in writing. Focus is on learning how to read, interpret and critically analyze literary selections. CS comp
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENG 103 - Writing a Life: Biographies and Personal Narratives

ENG 103 - Writing a Life: Biographies and Personal Narratives

3 credits
Biographies, autobiographies, diaries, and personal narratives are all ways of telling the narrative of a life. In this course, students will examine how writers take a life lived and turn it into a story. They will read biographies, autobiographies, and biographical narratives. The focus will be on reading widely and on intense engagement with the texts. Students will have the opportunity to create book lists, book talks, and/or web pages to explore their interpretations of biographical materials. CS comp
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Offered: Spring, Summer

ENG 104 - News Writing

ENG 104 - News Writing

3 credits
This course introduces students to news gathering and writing. Topics of exploration include collecting research, conducting interviews, news format, and ethics. Students learn elements of print and online reporting.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Offered: Fall

ENG 106 - Composition and Medical Literature

ENG 106 - Composition and Medical Literature

3 credits
This course focuses on the development of writing skills for the healthcare professional, emphasizing writing as an academic skill necessary to prepare students for entering the healthcare field. The course contains a particular focus on cultivating empathy and developing cross-cultural sensitivity in health care environments. In order to prepare students for successful written communication in their chosen field, students will learn to write in a way that targets specific audience members, such as the patient, family members of the patient and fellow healthcare professionals. The course also emphasizes questions and responses that stimulate thought, examine ethics, relate the material to broader universal issues, and necessitate critical interpretation. Students will be required to compile, organize, and logically present scientific and health information in research paper format, using citation and references. In addition, students will be expected to read literature related to healthcare issues and respond in journal and essay format. CS comp
Prerequisite(s): C or better in ENG 101
Offered: Fall

ENG 115 - Writing for the Human Services Professional

ENG 115 - Writing for the Human Services Professional

3 credits
This course will review the writing, documentation and recordkeeping skills required in human service professions. The course will prepare students to accurately and effectively document service delivery in a variety of organizational settings. Students will learn to create and maintain case records and progress notes as well as prepare professional reports and discharge summaries. In addition, the course will examine legal and ethical issues pertaining to documentation and recordkeeping. CS comp
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENG 201 - Introduction to Literature

ENG 201 - Introduction to Literature

3 credits
This course provides students with a broad overview of literary genres, history, and analysis. Students will read, discuss and write about stories, poems, and plays. They will develop strategies for reading with optimal comprehension and will also probe more deeply into the themes, symbols, and other forms of significance that can be found in rich and complex texts by such authors as Shakespeare, Poe, Dickinson, Faulkner, and Morrison. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Offered: Spring

ENG 212 - Grant Writing

ENG 212 - Grant Writing

3 credits
This course is designed to provide students with a general introduction to the field of grant writing. Instruction provides information on types of grants, common requirements of grant applications, and elements of a grant application. Students will learn to convey grant needs, assess resources, design a management plan, develop a budget, and conduct evaluations. Study in this course includes common grant applications, letters of inquiry, introductory letters, written contracts, formal reports and common correspondence. Students will learn how to search for grant availability and then develop an original grant application for a project or organization of their choice. Formerly listed as ENG 110. (Cross-referenced to BUS 212). CS comp
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENG 225 - Creative Writing

ENG 225 - Creative Writing

3 credits
This course explores writing as a creative art, with a specific focus on writing for children. Students will read, discuss, and write poetry, fiction, essays, and plays that are adapted for children from birth to 5 years. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Summer

ENG 230 - American Literature I

ENG 230 - American Literature I

3 credits
This course explores early American literature spanning centuries beginning with the European settlement through the early twentieth century. Students read, discuss, and write about the poetry, fiction, essays, and plays that represent the themes and perspectives of these centuries. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall

ENG 235 - American Literature II

ENG 235 - American Literature II

3 credits
This course introduces students to selected works of literature that represent major trends in American literature since the end of World War II. This course will help students understand the relationship between literature and life in contemporary America. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Spring

ENG 240 - The American Short Story

ENG 240 - The American Short Story

3 credits
In this course students will read and analyze a selection of American short stories from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Study will be chronological and historical with emphasis on the development of the genre. Authors may include Poe, Melville, Crane, Hawthorne, Twain, Gilman, Welty, Porter, and O'Connor. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall

ENG 245 - Contemporary American Poetry

ENG 245 - Contemporary American Poetry

3 credits
This course provides an introduction to contemporary poetic voices and reviews the predecessors and progresses to our modern poets: Lowell, Plath, Wilbur, Ginsberg, Bishop, and Brooks. The course culminates in an in-depth survey of some of the newest voices of the exploding Multicultural Renaissance, including Komunyakaa, Ai, Marilyn Nelson, and Lucille Clifton. Students will have discussions on the emergence of poetic movements such as the Beats, Language and Confessional Poetry, Feminism, Multiculturalism and Urban Poetry. C mc
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Spring

ENG 250 - English Literature I

ENG 250 - English Literature I

3 credits
This course explores various genres and periods of English literature, from Anglo-Saxon England to the Renaissance and into the contemporary period, analyzing for both literary content and historical context. Readings selected from a list of authors whose works have been recognized for their literary merit. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall

ENG 255 - English Literature II

ENG 255 - English Literature II

3 credits
This course explores various genres and periods of English literature, from the Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature to modern times, analyzing for both literary content and historical context. Readings will be selected from a list of authors whose works have been recognized for their literary merit. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Spring

ENG 260 - Stage, Screen and Television Drama

ENG 260 - Stage, Screen and Television Drama

3 credits
Dramatized scenarios play out around us all of the time. Because our culture avidly consumes plays, films, and scripted television shows, we rely on dramatic conventions in commercials, concerts, political demonstrations, and religious rituals . This course investigates these conventions through discussions of dramatic texts, including (but not limited to) plays, movies, and television shows. The course will provide students with an introduction to performance studies, media theory, and techniques of visual literacy, and will investigate various types of dramatic performance within a historical context. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101
Offered: Summer

ENG 265 - Caribbean Literature and Culture

ENG 265 - Caribbean Literature and Culture

3 credits
This course will explore the literature of the Caribbean from the nineteenth century to contemporary times. The course will focus on fiction and poetry of writers of the Diaspora and incorporate the history, politics, and culture that have helped shape the literature of the region. Themes addressed are: colonialism, language, migration/immigration, identity, and spirituality. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 201, ENG 250, and ENG 255
Offered: Spring

ENG 300 - Advanced Composition

ENG 300 - Advanced Composition

3 credits
This course is an introduction to reading and writing as critical inquiry, focusing on the rhetoric of written argument. Students will examine the various elements of argument such as claims, evidence, and language to discover and investigate the meaning of a text. Students will read a number of interesting and thought-provoking essays, de-construct them, and then write essays based on their readings. Students will learn to critique an essay thoughtfully and knowledgeably, as well as evaluate, analyze, synthesize ideas and evidence. CS aw
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENG 305 - The Modern Novel

ENG 305 - The Modern Novel

3 credits
For hundreds of years, novels have played an important role in representing the diversity and complexity of modern civilization. In our dynamic and global contemporary world, the power of the novel to bring together different voices is more important than ever. In this course, students will read, analyze, and discuss representative novels from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by authors such as Laura Esquivel, Khaled Hosseini, Kurt Vonnegut, and Toni Morrison. Course includes a research paper. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall

ENG 310 - Great Books of Western Literature

ENG 310 - Great Books of Western Literature

3 credits
This course explores works of Western literature that have significant impact on modern writing covering a sampling of ancient philosophers, poets, dramatists, and historians from Homer to St. Augustine. The focus will be on literary works from the Middle Ages to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will read, study and discuss the literary expressions throughout the ages including one of the longest surviving Old English epic poems, Beowulf, and selected works of Shakespeare, Goethe, Wordsworth, Beckett, Whitman, Dickens, Twain, and Faulkner. C
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Spring

ENG 311 - Greek Tragedy in Translation

ENG 311 - Greek Tragedy in Translation

3 credits
This course examines the extant tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the world which frames these works. Students will explore philosophical issues of determinism and free will, moral law and man-made law, human nature under incredible strain, changing relationships of friendship and enmity, and overweening pride bred of success. The topics covered will considers the evolution and conventions of Greek drama and its influence on later literature, music, and film. (Cross- referenced with HUM 311) C mc
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall

ENG 320 - Advanced Writing for Health Professionals

ENG 320 - Advanced Writing for Health Professionals

3 credits
This intensive writing course focuses on the development of writing skills for the health care professional, emphasizing writing as a communication skill necessary in the healthcare field. This advanced writing course centers on writing based on reading, interpretation, and discussion of academic and literary texts from personal, literary, scientific, and technological sources. The course also emphasizes questions and responses that stimulate thought, relates the material to broader universal issues, and necessitates critical interpretation. As an advanced writing course, it demonstrates how reading and writing in standardized English assists in enriching one's life and includes vigorous review of grammar, mechanics, paraphrasing, essay structure and development of stylistic strategies and techniques often using group and collegial critiques. The course also includes compiling, organizing, and logically presenting scientific and health information in research paper format, using citation and references. In addition, students will be expected to read literature related to healthcare issues and respond in journal and essay format. Formerly listed as ENG 220. CS aw
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall, Spring

ENG 325 - Advanced Writing for the Business Professional

ENG 325 - Advanced Writing for the Business Professional

3 credits
This course is designed to improve the writing competence of the business student for management level communications. It will utilize rhetorical principles and strategies to help students shape their business writing and oral presentations ethically, for multiple audiences, in a variety of professional situations. There is an emphasis on applying these rhetorical tools to on-the-job communications and to the development and editing of documents appropriate to business. Students will examine major forms of business and industrial writing, including correspondence, memoranda, and reports, such as executive briefs and annual reports. Formerly listed as ENG 125. CS aw
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall, Spring

ENG 330 - Narratives of Healing and Healthcare

ENG 330 - Narratives of Healing and Healthcare

3 credits
This course provides students with a venue for reflective and therapeutic writing that students can utilize throughout their career to promote their own self-awareness and self-care. The course focuses on the review of several types of literature which will assist healthcare providers to increase their understanding of and empathy for all individuals involved in the healthcare environment in order to be able to continue to contribute in a positive manner in that setting. aw
Prerequisite(s): C or better in ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Environmental Studies

ENV 103 - Introduction to Environmental Science

ENV 103 - Introduction to Environmental Science

4 credits
This core course for the Environmental Studies Program will provide an overview of 1) scientific principles on which studies of the environment are based; 2) current understandings of environmental problems from a scientific perspective; and, 3) evaluation of scientific evidence. Occasional field trips will be required. A
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENV 110 - Environmental Ethics

ENV 110 - Environmental Ethics

3 credits
This course examines diverse perspectives regarding values and environmental responsibility as well as the social factors and movements which embody them. Foci may include: Western Civilization and environmental ethics, environmental values in non-western cultures, environmental values in small scale societies, the aesthetics of nature, environmental values in fiction, and ecological ethics and technology. C e/p
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

ENV 120 - Environmental Law and Regulations

ENV 120 - Environmental Law and Regulations

3 credits
This course provides the background and skills development needed to understand and apply environmental law and regulations. Topics include: vocabulary of environmental regulation; the framework of federal, tribal and state environmental laws; basic legal/administrative processes; science and techniques for setting environmental standards; reporting, permitting and enforcement; stakeholder and public involvement in the regulatory process; and, negotiation and conflict resolution methods.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

ENV 130 - Explorations in Riverine Ecology

ENV 130 - Explorations in Riverine Ecology

3 credits
Students will be introduced to the ecology of river and stream ecosystems. Analysis of biological communities, physical and chemical attributes, watershed dynamics and current ecological theory will be covered. The course will focus on student participation in literature reading and discussions, field investigations, and lectures on general principles in river ecology. Field investigation of the Connecticut and Hockanum Rivers and analyses of water and soil samples will be included as field and laboratory investigations.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 121
Offered: Summer

ENV 140 - Water Utility Management and Operations

ENV 140 - Water Utility Management and Operations

3 credits
This course offers detailed information regarding all major areas of responsibility of a utility manager. Discussion will focus on why planning, organization, and recordkeeping are critical to virtually all aspects of utility management. Practical, up-to-date staffing guidelines presented in this course reflect widely accepted management practices for interviewing, hiring, supervising, and disciplining employees. Legal requirements of recent federal legislation such as the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) are discussed, as is the importance of developing policies and procedures for dealing with harassment, grievances, and violence in the workplace. In addition, this course highlights the essential elements of effective oral and written communications, including formal and informal public relations programs. A major segment of this course focuses on the financial management of a utility. Topics discussed in this segment include assessing the financial strength and stability of the utility, budgeting, and funding capital improvements.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

ENV 142 - Water Treatment and Operations

ENV 142 - Water Treatment and Operations

3 credits
This course is designed to train students in the practical aspects of operating and maintaining water treatment plants, emphasizing safe practices and procedures. Information is presented on the importance and responsibilities of a water treatment plant operator, sources of water, reservoir management, and intake structures. Students will learn how to safely operate and maintain coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, and disinfection processes. They will also learn to control tastes and odors in drinking water, control corrosion to meet the requirements of the Lead and Copper Rule, perform basic water laboratory procedures, and solve arithmetic problems commonly associated with water treatment plant operations. An important segment of the course provides operators information on overall plant operation and covers topics such as daily operating procedures, regulation of flows, chemical use and handling, records and reports, plant maintenance, safety and security, emergency conditions and procedures, handling complaints, and energy conservation.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

ENV 145 - Oceans and Human Health

ENV 145 - Oceans and Human Health

3 credits
This course examines the interdisciplinary nature of relationships between the oceans and human health. Global climate change, Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs), marine biopharmaceuticals, and the use of marine organisms as biomedical models will be some of the topics presented. Federal policies on oceans and human health will also be explored. Offered online.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

ENV 146 - Water Distribution Systems and Operations

ENV 146 - Water Distribution Systems and Operations

3 credits
This course is designed to train students in the practical aspects of operating and maintaining water distribution systems, emphasizing safe practices and procedures. Topics include the role and duties of water distribution system operators, procedures for operating and maintaining clear wells and storage tanks, components and characteristics of distribution system facilities, operating and maintaining distribution systems, maintaining water quality in the system, disinfecting new and repaired facilities as well as water delivered to consumers, and techniques for recognizing hazards and developing safe procedures and programs. Students will learn to analyze and solve problems when they occur and perform mathematical calculations commonly associated with operating a distribution system.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

ENV 150 - Introduction to Sustainable Energy

ENV 150 - Introduction to Sustainable Energy

3 credits
This introductory course provides information on global and national energy resources. The course explores the availability and consumption patterns of fossil fuels, nuclear fuels and alternative energy sources. The course will also investigate the topics such as electricity generation, transmission and distribution. Students will be introduced to concepts of transportation planning, sustainability and resource conservation as solutions to global challenges.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

ENV 155 - Environmental Physics

ENV 155 - Environmental Physics

3 credits
This course will introduce students to the application of core physics concepts related to energy and the environment, with special focus on: energy production, use and conversion; factors influencing the Earth's temperature; environmental monitoring techniques. The course should develop students' problem solving abilities, provide practice in the applications of physics and help to develop a critical awareness of the wider context of aspects of science and technology.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 130
Offered: Fall

ENV 168 - Introduction to Geography

ENV 168 - Introduction to Geography

3 credits
This is an introductory course in geography. The course encourages students to investigate the relationships between people, places and their way of life. Students will explore the topics such as physical earth (oceans, rivers, landscapes, mountains and deserts etc.); cultural patterns, how people live in different parts of the world, what they eat and why, what resources are available in which parts of the world, religions, languages, political divisions, economic activities and the interdependence of people. This course will make students aware of the physical world, maps, latitudes, longitudes and concepts of countries, city states and maritime boundaries. The course will also introduce various disciplines of geography such as human geography, physical, social, political and economic geography. (Cross-referenced with GEO 101)
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

ENV 200 - HAZWOPER

ENV 200 - HAZWOPER

3 credits
This course provides an overview of the technical fundamentals of hazardous materials management with emphasis on physical and regulatory aspects of this work. Successful completion of this course qualifies a student for a 40 hour OSHA HAZWOPER certificate.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

ENV 220 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

ENV 220 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

3 credits
Students in this course will explore the concepts of geography including natural features, population distribution and cultural aspects. Concepts will be discussed using a global focus. Geographic patterns will be examined by introducing students to the theory and applications of GIS software. GIS facilitates the organization and analysis of spatial data for research and for resource management. Topics include geographical data input, storage, manipulation, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with existing natural resource databases using GIS applications to produce spatial distribution maps of selected natural resources.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

ENV 225 - Geology and River Geomorphology

ENV 225 - Geology and River Geomorphology

3 credits
Students in this course will explore the concepts of geography including natural features, population distribution and cultural aspects. Concepts will be discussed using a global focus. Geographic patterns will be examined by introducing students to the theory and applications of GIS software. GIS facilitates the organization and analysis of spatial data for research and for resource management. Topics include geographical data input, storage, manipulation, maintenance, analysis and retrieval. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with existing natural resource databases using GIS applications to produce spatial distribution maps of selected natural resources.
Prerequisite(s): ENV 130
Offered: Spring

ENV 230 - Aquatic Ecology

ENV 230 - Aquatic Ecology

4 credits
An introduction to plant and animal life in the fresh water habitats of the Connecticut River, this course focuses on the biology and behavior of plants, animals, and microbes living in water. Studies center on freshwater inland lakes, ponds, rivers, brooks, and wetlands. All aspects of life in fresh water, from algae, to salmon, to plankton are involved. Laboratory and field work are included.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 121
Offered: Spring

ENV 232 - Principles in Floodplain Ecology

ENV 232 - Principles in Floodplain Ecology

4 credits
During this course students will learn to study the flow dynamics of the Connecticut river and how they relate to global flooding concerns along major rivers. Topics covered include: the structure, function and value of river floodplain ecosystems; functioning of river floodplain systems (river continuum, flood-pulse, connectivity, disturbance and stability); energy and matter flux; global status quo of floodplain ecosystems; heavily impacted river systems, including ecological deficits, constraints of human needs and public interests to establish semi-natural conditions; and conservation and restoration strategies. Laboratory and field work included.
Prerequisite(s): ENV 103
Offered: Spring

ENV 234 - Site and Risk Assessment

ENV 234 - Site and Risk Assessment

3 credits
This course will survey the general principles and practices of environmental health risk assessment for chemicals in the environment and interactions with other factors continuing to human health risks. A variety of case studies will be used to demonstrate the basic methods and results of risk assessment, from hazard and dose-response assessment to uncertainty analysis and risk communication.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

ENV 235 - Remediation and Restoration

ENV 235 - Remediation and Restoration

3 credits
Investigates pollution sources, fundamental principles of site assessment, and techniques, processes, and technologies commonly used to remediate and restore sites; covers how to assess the environmental parameters of a given site, develop site remediation plans and review site remediation and restoration case studies.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

ENV 240 - Special Topics in Water Treatment

ENV 240 - Special Topics in Water Treatment

3 credits
This course will encompass areas of specialized interest centered on changing knowledge and important issues in the field of water treatment. Topics covered will vary based on the most recent scientific information and regulations in water treatment.
Prerequisite(s): ENV 142
Offered: Summer

ENV 242 - Special Topics in Water Distribution

ENV 242 - Special Topics in Water Distribution

3 credits
This course will encompass areas of specialized interest centered on changing knowledge and important issues in the field of water distribution. Topics covered will vary based on the most recent scientific information and regulations in water distribution.
Prerequisite(s): ENV 146
Offered: Summer

ENV 250 - Environmental Contaminants and Sanitation

ENV 250 - Environmental Contaminants and Sanitation

3 credits
This course looks at how water supply, wastewater disposal, solid wastes, air pollution, food, vectors, and radiation affect public health and communicable diseases. Students will be introduced to techniques of collecting appropriate water, air and waste samples for analysis and will learn how to review the laboratory data and assess how it relates to public health concerns. Course includes lecture and occasional field trips.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 121
Offered: Spring

ENV 252 - Human Health in the Environment

ENV 252 - Human Health in the Environment

3 credits
This course studies the relationship of people to their environment, how it affects their physical well-being and what they can do to influence the quality of the environment and to enhance the protection of their health. Emphasis on environmental factors involved in transmission of communicable diseases and hazards due to exposure to chemical and physical materials in our environment. Topics include environmental pollutants; physical, chemical, and biological agents of environmental contamination through air, water, and soil; solid and hazardous waste; susceptible populations and risk analysis; the scientific basis for policy decisions; and emerging global environmental health problems.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 121
Offered: Summer

ENV 255 - Environmental Monitoring

ENV 255 - Environmental Monitoring

4 credits
Students learn environmental sampling theory and techniques, data collection, field and laboratory instrumentation, quality assurance and documentation. They will study soil, water, air and biological sampling, and mapping and surveying techniques. Lecture, laboratory and field trios are included.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 121 and CHEM 110
Offered: Spring

ENV 299 - Environmental Studies Internship

ENV 299 - Environmental Studies Internship

3 credits
The internship experience will offer students an opportunity to carry class lectures, readings and research beyond the classroom, enriching their studies with new depth and complexity uniquely provided by first-hand experience. The internship requires 135 hours of work at a facility. The internship may be undertaken during the regular school year or during the summer; however, internship presentations and papers can only be evaluated during fall or spring semesters. At the beginning of the internship, students and the internship advisor will agree to a learning contract that establishes specific goals as well as a schedule for achieving them. Interns will meet collectively during the semester to share their experiences and to present brief reports.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of all required course work or permission of program director
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

ENV 310 - Environmental Public Policy, Theory and Practices

ENV 310 - Environmental Public Policy, Theory and Practices

3 credits
This course presents an overview of major federal, state, and local environmental policy domains. Analyzes political, social, economic, and other forces influencing federal and state public policy responses to land use, natural resources, pollution, and conservation dilemmas.
Prerequisite(s): ENV 120
Offered: Spring

ENV 315 - Geography and Rivers of the World

ENV 315 - Geography and Rivers of the World

3 credits
Environmental geology encompasses natural science, social science and humanistic understandings of the Earth's environment from a global perspective. In this course we build on the study of physical and human geography undertaken in ENV 2XX and examine global differences in geology and geomorphology of river systems. Regional and global differences in geology and hydrology create variations in fluvial geomorphology with dramatically differing impacts on water availability, water quality, and aquatic resources. Collectively these factors directly influence human population distribution and relative well-being. Students will select a river system and explore in detail its geomorphology, natural resources and cultural implications.
Prerequisite(s): ENV 2XX Geography and Geographic Information Systems
Offered: Summer

ENV 320 - Environmental and Industry Toxicology

ENV 320 - Environmental and Industry Toxicology

3 credits
Presents an overview of information needed to assess the relationship between the environment, workplace and health. Topics include facets of industrial hygiene, air and water pollution, radiation monitoring, toxicology studies, clinical occupational medicine and biologic monitoring.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 110 & CHEM 111
Offered: Spring

ENV 325 - Land Use and Watershed Management

ENV 325 - Land Use and Watershed Management

3 credits
The purpose of this course is to develop skills in watershed-based, economic and environmental problem-solving; to understand linkages between biological, physical, hydrologic and socio economic processes; and to develop an interdisciplinary perspective in evaluating and managing watersheds as a system. Students will explore the public policies and practices of watershed planning by examining case studies in water supply, water quality, drought, floodplain, and stormwater management in the Connecticut River basin. The watershed management curriculum will utilize a multi-disciplinary approach involving the fields of geography, environmental science, geology, public policy, urban and regional land planning, geographic information systems (GIS).
Prerequisite(s): ENV 130
Offered: Spring

ENV 330 - Principles of Environmental Health

ENV 330 - Principles of Environmental Health

3 credits
This course provides an overview of some of the most important and current challenges to human health from environmental and occupational risk factors while teaching knowledge and skills used to assess, control and prevent them. Specific threats will be addressed, such as air pollution, toxic metals, and pesticides as well as occupational stressors. Emphasis will also be given to understanding the worsening environmental health impacts of industrialization and the effects of globalization. (Cross-referenced with HSC 330)
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

ENV 410 - Methods in Research and Practice

ENV 410 - Methods in Research and Practice

3 credits
This course concentrates on the details of public health research design. It is designed to guide students through a step-by-step approach to qualitative, comparative, and quantitative research designs and analysis methods. Students will learn the language of research, various methods for conducting research and how to identify and synthesize research literature. Course will build on concepts covered in the other courses in the public health/community health concentration. r
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition and STAT 167
Offered: Fall

ENV 420 – Environmental Health Planning

ENV 420 – Environmental Health Planning

3 credits
Study of strategic and operational planning methodologies employed by environmental health administrators, educators and planners involved with community environmental health agencies and programs.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

ENV 430 – Current Issues in River Conservation

ENV 430 – Current Issues in River Conservation

3 credits
This course will explore current issues in river conservation technology with a focus on the Connecticut River and its role as a regional resource. Guest speakers will address present day problems managing water ways on a local, regional and global basis. Students will work in groups to research watershed management techniques.
Prerequisite(s): ENV 130 Explorations in Riverine Ecology
Offered: Summer

ENV 435 - Senior Seminar in River Conservation

ENV 435 - Senior Seminar in River Conservation

3 credits
This is a senior level course based on interactive dialogue, research papers and seminars. Students will identify a particular area of interest related to the problems of water sustainability, resource protection, watershed development, as examples, to develop a problem statement. Students will then undertake literature based research to develop and articulate our current understanding of the issue and the implications relative to public policy. Students will draw upon their class learnings and other experiences to identify the issue of interest to them, to prepare a research paper and to present the findings in a formal seminar setting to fellow students.
Prerequisite(s): ENV 130 Explorations in Riverine Ecology
Offered: Spring

ENV 460 – Capstone: Environmental Studies

ENV 460 – Capstone: Environmental Studies

3 credits
The Capstone course is designed to provide graduating seniors with an opportunity to integrate the sum of their learning and acquired skills in a particular study area and to demonstrate they have achieved the goals established by Goodwin and their department. Seniors will work with their respective department advisors to develop a specific project that may take a variety of forms; senior research project and paper; portfolio; or multi-faceted project. Oral presentations to peers and faculty will be required. Students wishing to pursue graduate school may choose a narrowly defined topic consistent with their career aspirations.
Prerequisite(s): Environmental Studies BS Degree core
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


FS

FS 102 - Introduction to Family Studies

FS 102 - Introduction to Family Studies

3 credits
This course is designed to expose students to real-world experience in the field of Family Studies. This 100-hour fieldwork opportunity is individually designed based on student interests and career goals. Students will meet weekly for a 2-hour seminar in addition to their 100 fieldwork hours. During the weekly seminar, current topics related to the field of Family Studies will be explored and discussed. The seminar will also serve as a forum for students to share their fieldwork experiences and reflect on their time in local agencies.
Prerequisite(s):Successful completion of ENG 099 or concurrent enrollment
Offered: Spring

FS 251 - Family Studies Fieldwork

FS 251 - Family Studies Fieldwork

3 credits
This course is designed to expose students to real-world experience in the field of Family Studies. This 100-hour fieldwork opportunity is individually designed based on student interests and career goals. Students will meet weekly for a 2-hour seminar in addition to their 100 fieldwork hours. During the weekly seminar, current topics related to the field of Family Studies will be explored and discussed. The seminar will also serve as a forum for students to share their fieldwork experiences and reflect on their time in local agencies.
Prerequisite(s):: FS 102 + 30 accumulated credits + minimum 2.0CUM GPA
Offered:

FS 301 - Family Relationships and Communication Systems

FS 301 - Family Relationships and Communication Systems

3 credits
This course covers the various effective and ineffective ways in which communication takes place within family relationships. Topics include communication within the different stages of the family life cycle, such as conflict resolution, abuse, the evolution of relationships and communication styles, as well as, ways to effectively identify and end relationships when necessary.
Prerequisite(s):FS 102 Introduction to Family Studies
Offered: Summer

FS 401 - Family Interventions

FS 401 - Family Interventions

3 credits
This course covers historical and current trends of family intervention including, psychodynamic, transgenerational, experiential, and Milan models. Key theorists such as Freud, Bowen, Whitaker, and Haley will be discussed. Legal and ethical considerations will also be addressed.
Prerequisite(s):FS 101 Introduction to Family Studies
Offered:Spring

FS 410 - Research in Family Studies

FS 410 - Research in Family Studies

3 credits
This course concentrates on the details of social science research methods. It is designed to guide students through a step-by-step approach to qualitative, comparative, and quantitative research designs and analysis methods. Students will learn the language of research, various methods for conducting research and how to identify and synthesize research literature. Course will build on concepts covered in previous courses.
Prerequisite(s):
Offered: Fall

FS 450 - Family Studies Capstone Seminar

FS 450 - Family Studies Capstone Seminar

4 credits
This course is designed to extend student’s learning by engaging them in project-based work in the field of family studies. Students in this course will work with leaders in the community and learn how to formulate goals, strategies and objectives for a project. The project should be designed to enhance current practices within an organization that serves families. The student will choose an organization that represents most closely the type of work they wish to have upon completion of their degree. If applicable, the organization could be in the student’s place of work if it meets the criteria set by the program and course advisor. In addition to the field project, the student will also engage in a 3-hour per week instructional seminar where he/she will explore current topics and trends impacting the field of family studies today as well as reflect on their project experiences. Students will have many opportunities to build metacognitive skills and extend their critical thinking skills as they reflect, evaluate, compare and synthesize their projects and the information presented to them in seminar.
Prerequisite(s):All core Family Studies courses + minimum 2.0CUM GPA
Offered:Spring

Back to the top


Geography

GEO 101 - Introduction to Geography

GEO 101 - Introduction to Geography

3 credits
This is an introductory course in geography. The course encourages students to investigate the relationships between people, places and their way of life. Students will explore the topics such as physical earth (oceans, rivers, landscapes, mountains and deserts etc.); cultural patterns, how people live in different parts of the world, what they eat and why, what resources are available in which parts of the world, religions, languages, political divisions, economic activities and the interdependence of people. This course will make students aware of the physical world, maps, latitudes, longitudes and concepts of countries, city states and maritime boundaries. The course will also introduce various disciplines of geography such as human geography, physical, social, political and economic geography. (Cross-referenced with ENV 168)
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

Back to the top


History

HIS 101 - American History Since 1900

HIS 101 - American History Since 1900

3 credits
This course provides a study of America's political, social, intellectual, and diplomatic history from its post-Civil War industrialization to the present. Topics cover the development of a city-based industrial economy, World War I, the interwar years, the New Deal, World War II, Vietnam, race relations, social and political conflicts, and later economic changes of the 20th century. The course provides study of recent Presidential administrations and 21st century domestic and international issues, including the impact of a global economy on contemporary America.G us
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring

HIS 119 - Introduction to Early World History

HIS 119 - Introduction to Early World History

3 credits
This course surveys the political, economic, cultural, and intellectual development of cultures across the world from earliest times to the Industrial Revolution. G w
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

HIS 120 - Introduction to Modern World History

HIS 120 - Introduction to Modern World History

3 credits
This course examines the political, economic, cultural, and intellectual development of nations across the world in the years since 1900, as well as the emergence of non-governmental centers of power such as terrorist groups and international corporations. Topics include the Great Power Rivalries and World War I, the increasing importance of the United States in the world, Latin American issues, the roles of Japan, China and India in the Far East, the evolution of Israeli/Arab hostility, the independence movements in Africa, and global interrelations today. G w
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HIS 210 – Introduction to African American Studies

HIS 210 – Introduction to African American Studies

3 credits
This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of the African-American experience from pre-colonial Africa to the present. Topics will focus on key figures ,a wide range of contemporary issues, and history of slavery and the struggle for freedom and justice. Formerly listed as HIS 110. G us mc
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HIS 220 – Contemporary African History

HIS 220 – Contemporary African History

3 credits
This course examines the contemporary African History from 1471 to present using case studies and examples to illustrate the development of Africa. Students will consider the role of Europe and the Americas on the development of Africa and how Africa has been impacted positively and negatively by that contact. There will be an examination of African leadership, social development, political structure and economic development. The impact of conflict will also be considered in this course. The course also impresses on students the need to understand African from all prisms in order to get a broader understanding and knowledge of the richest continent with the poorest inhabitants. C, Gw, mc
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

HIS 235 - Global Issues

HIS 235 - Global Issues

3 credits
This course introduces students to knowledge about the world and international issues. It explores general issues and trends facing the contemporary world involving ethnicity and global diversity, politics, economics, population, human development, environment, human ecology, human rights, technology, and peace and war. Students will explore significant issues that are shaped by global forces and international institutions and how the United States is impacted by and connected to those issues. (Cross-referenced with BUS 235) G M
Prerequisite(s): ECN 101
Offered: Spring

HIS 310 - Social History of American Women

HIS 310 - Social History of American Women

3 credits
This course covers the social history of American women from colonial times through modern times. A diversity of women's and ethnic groups will be studied in terms of their specific experiences and how they have been affected by the cultural ideals and basic institutions of American society, including European Americans, Native Americans, African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans. The course also covers the history and present-day trends involved with topics such as women and work, women and education, alternate gender orientations/sexualities, and female-headed households. G us S mc
Prerequisite(s): Recommended HIS 101, but not required
Offered: Spring, Summer

HIS 315 - Minorities and Immigrants in the United States

HIS 315 - Minorities and Immigrants in the United States

3 credits
This advanced, research-oriented course provides a study of the experiences of America's immigrants and minorities. Beginning with the first English and Spanish settlements and their effect on the earliest inhabitants then moving on to issues of slavery, and the Irish immigration. The main focus of the course is on developments since the 1880s covering well-assimilated Europeans and Russian Jews; new immigrants of Hispanic, Asiatic, Middle Eastern origin; and African Americans and women taking their place in American society. Students are required to do a major project using either oral history or written and literary sources on issues confronting newer ethnic or otherwise disadvantaged groups. G us mc
Prerequisite(s): HIS 101 & ENG 101
Offered: Fall

HIS 320 - Topical Studies in Modern World History

HIS 320 - Topical Studies in Modern World History

3 credits
Political, economic, and cultural causes of significant events and controversies in modern world history are analyzed, with emphasis on student research and use of primary sources. Topics include ethnic rivalries in the Balkans just prior to World War I and again after the Cold War; economic and political stresses on the post-World War I governments of Great Britain, France, Italy, and Germany; Marxism, Russian Communism, and Fascism as effective tools of national economic development; the rise of Japan and the internal political struggles within China and India; economic disparities, democracy, and dictatorship in Latin America; and the economic and political consequences of independence movements in Africa. Emphasis is placed on student investigation and reporting in seminar fashion. Students are required to write a major documented research paper and develop a classroom presentation on a crisis confronting a modern state since 1940. G w mc
Prerequisite(s): HIS 101 or HIS 120
Offered: Fall, Spring

HIS 330 - Hispanic Culture and History

HIS 330 - Hispanic Culture and History

3 credits
Students will study how major historical events influenced the evolution of Hispanic culture. Students will also research and discuss relevant literature, music, art, theater, religion, politics and current events. Writing assignments will challenge students to consider the development of Hispanic values in the United States and around the world. C G w
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

Back to the top


Histology

HLT 102 - Introduction to Histology

HLT 102 - Introduction to Histology

3 credits
Principles and practices of quality management, laboratory safety, professional conduct and laboratory information systems are outlined. This course orients the student to procedures, policies and manuals. Laboratory instruction will include explanation and demonstration of regulatory agencies, glassware, solution preparation, troubleshooting, quality control, chemistry and safety procedures as well as precautions given in the laboratory setting. Care and use of a microscope, basic tissue identification to include sectioning artifacts. This laboratory experience demonstrates a working knowledge of instrumentation, supplies, and solutions.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring

HLT 110 - Histologic Techniques

HLT 110 - Histologic Techniques

3 credits
This course introduces students to the various methods employed in sectioning of tissue, bone decalcification, mounting media, and embedding in the following media: paraffin, celloidin, and plastic.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HLT 113 - Concepts of Staining and Fixation

HLT 113 - Concepts of Staining and Fixation

3 credits
This course builds on the foundation of Histologic Techniques I and describes organic and inorganic chemistry in relation to histology. Theoretical and practical methods of basic nuclear and cytoplasmic staining and tissue fixation are presented. Students learn the classification of biological stains and their applications in succession with the principles and concepts that closely coincide with the laboratory content taught in the student lab. Fixation topics include the utilization of primary fixatives, modifiers and mixtures necessary for optimum fixation of tissue specimens. Artifacts, oxidation, reduction, compatible staining procedures, and instruments employed during tissue fixation are discussed.
Prerequisite(s): HLT 110
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HLT 114 - Histology Laboratory Experience

HLT 114 - Histology Laboratory Experience

2 credits
Throughout this laboratory experience the student acquires a working knowledge of sectioning biopsies, levels, serial and step sections, processing schedules, paraffin embedding of tissue, paraffin sectioning techniques, routine staining, mounting techniques, and troubleshooting. The opportunity to evaluate and present a scholarly journal article is also included.
Prerequisite(s): HLT 102 & HLT 110
Offered: Spring, Summer

HLT 209 - Special Staining Lab

HLT 209 - Special Staining Lab

3 credits
This course is offered concurrently with Staining II Lectures and offers hands-on application of dyes and microscopic evaluations demonstrating special staining and immunohistochemistry techniques.
Prerequisite(s): HLT 102 & HLT 110
Offered: Spring, Summer

HLT 210 - Staining II

HLT 210 - Staining II

3 credits
This staining course closely coincides with chemistry and anatomy topics. Subject matter covers staining of: carbohydrates, microorganisms, nerve tissue, lipids, special cells, microincineration, eye techniques, hematopathogy as well as primary reagents or dyes, mechanisms of actions and source of error in staining and appropriate corrections.
Prerequisite(s): HLT 102 & HLT 110
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HLT 230 - Histology Capstone and Seminar

HLT 230 - Histology Capstone and Seminar

3 credits
This course is offered concurrently with staining II lectures, hands on application of dyes, and microscopic evaluations.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HLT 290 - Histology Clinical Experience

HLT 290 - Histology Clinical Experience

7 credits
Students master the procedures and hone their technical skills at a clinical site under the supervision of an experienced technician. Clinical significance of laboratory procedures in diagnosis and treatment is applied. Students perform various routine duties (coverslipping, sectioning, staining, decalcification, and gross tissue handling, etc). This practical experience combined with techniques acquired in the student lab enables the student to become accustomed to applying histologic procedures to a scheduled arrangement of duties with established deadlines.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Summer

Back to the top


Healthcare Sciences

HSC 100 - CPR for the Healthcare Professional

HSC 100 - CPR for the Healthcare Professional

1 credit
The BLS Healthcare Provider Course teaches CPR skills for helping victims of all ages including doing ventilation with a barrier device, a bag-mask device, and oxygen. Students also learn how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED). Finally, students will learn how to provide relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (FBAO). It's intended for participants who provide heath care to patients in a wide variety of settings, including in-hospital and out-of-hospital. This course is appropriate for certified or non-certified, licensed or non-licensed healthcare professionals.
Prerequisite(s):PHB 120
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSC 101 - Introduction to Healthcare

HSC 101 - Introduction to Healthcare

3 credits
This course introduces concepts that are fundamental to all healthcare occupations. Topics will include the structure of the healthcare system and current trends in healthcare. A variety of healthcare careers, including qualifications, educational requirements and personal characteristics will also be discussed. Finally, communication with patients and other professionals, lifestyle choices and ethical-legal issues will also be emphasized.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Summer

HSC 105 - Medical Terminology

HSC 105 - Medical Terminology

3 credits
This 45-hour course teaches medical terminology through the presentation of root words, prefixes and suffixes. Correct spelling and pronunciation of these terms is stressed throughout. Introduction to common medical abbreviations, symbols and body systems will also be presented. Formerly listed as MED 101.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSC 110 - Medicine and Society

HSC 110 - Medicine and Society

3 credits
This course focuses on individual, community and institutional health care needs and issues from both the bio-medical and socio-cultural points of view. It explores issues regarding health care insurance, the uninsured and underserved, managed care and changes in healthcare marketplace, and provides an overview of major diseases, including epidemics, chronic and acute illness. Discussion of the role of health promotion and prevention will also be explored.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Summer

HSC 111 - Medical Law and Ethics

HSC 111 - Medical Law and Ethics

3 credits
This 45-hour course addresses medical ethics, medical practice acts, legal responsibilities of the health professional, professional liability and the civic duties of the health professional. The class makes use of the Internet, newspapers and other publications for the discussion of current events related to medical law and ethics. Formerly listed as MED 111. e/p
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSC 120 - Health and Wellness

HSC 120 - Health and Wellness

3 credits
This introductory course covers health and wellness models. It includes healthy life style goals, such as diet, nutrition, weight control and exercise. Additionally, risk factors to poor health such as alcohol, illegal drugs, drug abuse, and smoking will be discussed. The course also covers mental health issues and the special needs of this patient population, along with patient education techniques.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring

HSC 205 - Plague, Epidemics and Society

HSC 205 - Plague, Epidemics and Society

3 credits
This course explores various historical and modern epidemics, including the Plague. Students will be introduced to the means of transmission, the signs and symptoms of the disease, as well as the prognosis. Furthermore, students will gain an appreciation for how society reacted to the epidemic and the affected individuals. No previous science or medical background is required for this course.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSC 212 - Health Information Systems

HSC 212 - Health Information Systems

3 credits
Coursework includes organizational change issues in health care environments, resource management (inventory, tracking, and acquisition) and the role of policy formulation. Consumer issues, standards and security, and the provision of health information resources to health care workers will also be covered. Relevant applications and issues related to health services will also be explored.
Prerequisite(s): CAP 110
Offered: Spring

HSC 220 - Environmental Health Law and Public Policy

HSC 220 - Environmental Health Law and Public Policy

3 credits
This course surveys the major issues in environmental health and related public policy, focusing on similarities and differences between US and international regulatory efforts. The role of government, industry, academia and advocacy groups is discussed.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

HSC 240 - Introduction to Alternative and Complementary Medicine

HSC 240 - Introduction to Alternative and Complementary Medicine

3 credits
This course will examine the theory, philosophy and applications of complementary and alternative medicine within today's health care system. Students will learn about the many alternatives to traditional Western or allopathic medicine, and how these various models, systems and therapies impact on the delivery of health care in the United States. Students will become aware of the vast array of resources available and the type of training involved in license/certification.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSC 299 - Health Science Internship Experience

HSC 299 - Health Science Internship Experience

3 credits
This course is a 150-hour practical field experience that is based on theories and learning outcomes associated with the Associate in Health Science curriculum. It provides an opportunity for students to blend theory and practice through an actual supervised work experience in a health services organization. Specific learning objectives for the experience will be developed through a collaboration of the student, host organization and faculty member.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSC 302 - Public Health and Personnel Administration

HSC 302 - Public Health and Personnel Administration

3 credits
This course covers selection and management of personnel in healthcare; effects and development of review systems and assessment. Discussions of accountability and productivity of healthcare employees.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Summer

HSC 305 - Ethical and Legal Issues in Healthcare

HSC 305 - Ethical and Legal Issues in Healthcare

3 credits
The course explores various ethical and legal issues faced by healthcare practitioners. The course provides the student with the framework for identifying ethical dilemmas in the professional setting, as well as the skills and resources for addressing them. Topics include basic principles of health care ethics, confidentiality, management of health care information, allocation of scarce resources, and autonomy versus paternalism. e/p
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSC 310 - U.S. Healthcare Delivery Systems

HSC 310 - U.S. Healthcare Delivery Systems

3 credits
This course will explore the U.S. Health System focusing on its historical development, current configuration and future direction. Included will be the study of health system development, key influencers, accessibility, financing, changing components and the effects the system has on patients, providers, financers, employers, government and insurers. Particular attention will be paid to the future direction of healthcare and what parts are likely to change.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall, Summer

HSC 312 - Organization and Administration of Long-Term Care

HSC 312 - Organization and Administration of Long-Term Care

3 credits
This course will include types and functions of long term care facilities and related providers are discussed. Students participate in critical analysis of long term care administration relating to reimbursement, resource use, quality assurance and ethical and legal issues.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall, Summer

HSC 320 - Health Administration

HSC 320 - Health Administration

3 credits
This course provides the knowledge and skills to management functions, tasks, and roles as they are carried out in the health service organizations. Discussion of emerging issues affecting the management of health services organizations is provided. This course uses the case methods of analysis to develop critical thinking skills.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Spring

HSC 330 - Principles of Environmental Health Science

HSC 330 - Principles of Environmental Health Science

3 credits
This course provides an overview of some of the most important and current challenges to human health from environmental and occupational risk factors while teaching knowledge and skills used to assess, control and prevent them. Specific threats will be addressed, such as air pollution, toxic metals, and pesticides as well as occupational stressors. Emphasis will also be given to understanding the worsening environmental health impacts of industrialization and the effects of globalization.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Spring

HSC 340 - Physical Agents/Ergonomic Hazards in the Workplace

HSC 340 - Physical Agents/Ergonomic Hazards in the Workplace

3 credits
This course will include discussions on problems with occupational exposures to physical agents. Health effects, evaluation and control of exposure to non ionizing radiation, noise, heat and ergonomics are covered.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Spring

HSC 350 - Continuous Quality Improvement

HSC 350 - Continuous Quality Improvement

3 credits
This course provides basic principles associated with Total Quality Management (TQM) and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). Aids identification and quality problem-solving found in all health care organizations utilizing CQI tools and techniques. Through the use of case studies, current events, and textbook materials, students will learn how to identify problems, recommend improvements, and collect data to demonstrate process improvement.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition
Offered: Fall

HSC 410 - Epidemiology

HSC 410 - Epidemiology

3 credits
This course introduces epidemiology and its uses. It will introduce the basic methods for infectious disease epidemiology and case studies of important disease syndromes. This course provides discussion of epidemiologic topics, methods, measure of disease occurrences, common types and sources of data, problems unique to the study of health and the environment, education on issues of environmental exposures and their human health effects.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition and STAT 167
Offered: Fall

HSC 420 - Methods in Research and Practice

HSC 420 - Methods in Research and Practice

3 credits
This course concentrates on the details of public health research design. It is designed to guide students through a step-by-step approach to qualitative, comparative, and quantitative research designs and analysis methods. Students will learn the language of research, various methods for conducting research and how to identify and synthesize research literature. Course will build on concepts covered in the other courses in the public health/community health concentration. r
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 3 additional credits in composition and STAT 167
Offered: Fall

HSC 450 - Senior Capstone for Health Science

HSC 450 - Senior Capstone for Health Science

3 credits
As part of the completion of the B.S. in Health Science each student will be required to complete a capstone, or culminating experience, prior to graduation. A capstone experience is defined as one that requires a student to synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in course work and to his/her learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in a situation that approximates some aspect of professional practice. This course provides an opportunity to study a practical and current issue selected by the students. Students will apply critical thinking, analytical abilities, and communication skills that integrate the core academic areas of public health including biostatistics, epidemiology, health education, health policy, and environmental health. The final course report acts as the official written comprehensive examination, the fulfillment of the culminating experience requirement.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: By arrangement

HSC 460 - Health Science Internship

HSC 460 - Health Science Internship

3 credits
This course provides at least 150-hours of an internship in a health service organization. Under the supervision of a full time faculty member and an approved preceptor, students will work on a project related to management, development or administration in health science. This course allows students to demonstrate professional competency in health sciences. The internship is an integral part of the Health Science curriculum as it is intended to broaden students' perspectives and provide experience in applying the theory and content learned in their didactic course work.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSC 470 - Health Science Study Abroad

HSC 470 - Health Science Study Abroad

3 credits
This independent study provides the student with the opportunity to have a short term study abroad experience. The student will study health care in an international environment. This course is intended for the student who is volunteering for a healthcare experience outside of the USA.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission

Back to the top


Homeland Security

HSM 101 - Introduction to Homeland Security

HSM 101 - Introduction to Homeland Security

3 credits
This course provides a general introduction to the field of Homeland Security. In addition to an examination of the events leading up to and occurring on 9/11, the effectiveness of the Homeland Security system and theories related to the topic are presented. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the U. S. Department of Homeland Security.
Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENG 099 or higher
Offered: Spring

HSM 102 - Introduction to Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

HSM 102 - Introduction to Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

3 credits
This course will provide a study of WMD to include the definition, the identification, the analysis, the threats (international and domestic) and a review of risk assessment issues. There will be a general recognition of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive agents, and defensive considerations and control issues associated with criminal incidents. This course explores the different types, feature and limitations of commercially available detection instruments for Weapons of Mass Destruction chemicals and materials. This course also covers decontamination options and requirements for victims and responders to a WMD incident. Hospital and personnel resources will be some of the main topics reviewed and discussed for activity, responsibility and requirements.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

HSM 103 - Emergency Planning: Response, Preparedness and Testing for Critical Incidents

HSM 103 - Emergency Planning: Response, Preparedness and Testing for Critical Incidents

3 credits
This course addresses the special needs of emergency planners whether they be in response to natural disasters such as flooding, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, or volcanoes as well as planning and preparedness issues to address man-made terrorist threats. The concepts of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery will be addressed as well as Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP), Continuity of Government (COG), and Business Continuity Planning (BCP) as well as many other aspects of emergency planning and management.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

HSM 104 - Domestic and International Terrorisms

HSM 104 - Domestic and International Terrorism

3 credits
This course introduces students to various aspects of international terrorism. Included will be the basic principles of terrorist investigation, Federal and state terrorism laws, prosecution of international terrorists, domestic security threats, malicious religious extremists, drug cartels, and the motivational factors and tactics that drive these organizations. G us w
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

HSM 105 - Contemporary Ethical Perspectives

HSM 105 - Contemporary Ethical Perspectives

3 credits
This course will examine ethics and professional responsibility. Due to the power given to those in the criminal justice system, society has come to expect a higher standard of behavior and responsibility from those individuals. This course will discuss and examine how the work environment and a sense of ethics and professional responsibility can mutually exist. The concept of Just War and the ethical concepts associated with terrorism will also be discussed.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSM 106 - Investigative Report Writing

HSM 106 - Investigative Report Writing

3 credits
This course combines the basics of two disciplines—investigation and report writing, and bridges the gap between them in order to teach the basics involved in writing an investigative report. Fundamental guidelines for investigative reports are established through a set of rules that are easy to understand and apply in any type of report writing scenario. Topics include note taking, describing persons and property, crime and arrest reports, search warrants, and issues in writing. (Cross-referenced to CJS 106) CS, comp
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring

HSM 111 - Contemporary Issues in Crime and Prevention

HSM 111 - Contemporary Issues in Crime and Prevention

3 credits
This course will examine the cause and effect relationship between contemporary problems in our society and how they relate to crime and prevention. Issue such as substance abuse, domestic violence, DNA testing, the ACLU and the widespread use of the Internet will be discussed in their relation to the criminal justice system and Homeland Security. (Cross-referenced to CJS 111)
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

HSM 118 - Introduction to Fire Technology

HSM 118 - Introduction to Fire Technology

3 credits
This course introduces students to the many areas of fire protection, using a systems approach. Overviews the system components of modern fire department responsibility and features the latest incident command system information. Introduction to Fire Technology explores such cutting-edge issues as homeland security, goal setting and accomplishment, life safety initiatives, recent laws affecting firefighters, and more. Progressive information on fire protection in the community from both the planning and application standpoints offers a well-rounded view of the fire service's function in community risk reduction. The course provides an understanding and tools for individuals seeking a career in the fire service.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

HSM 120 - First Responder Training

HSM 120 - First Responder Training

3 credits
Students will be introduced to the knowledge and skills necessary to function as a trained First Responder and identify and manage the most common types of injuries and illnesses encountered in the pre-hospital setting. Students will also be exposed to concepts on responding to fire, hazmat, and evacuation operations and be given an overview in the incident command system.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSM 122 - Emergency Management

HSM 122 - Emergency Management

3 credits
This course is designed to help first responders as well as healthcare management professionals (including physicians and nurses with management responsibility) assess, mitigate and deal with the medical, physical and economic risks and challenges associate with terrorism involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). Topics to be discussed include: risk analysis, OSHA and other regulatory standards, integration of hospital and community emergency management, special aspects of hazardous materials emergencies, and business and financial recovery planning.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSM 130 - Introduction to Computer Crimes and Security

HSM 130 - Introduction to Computer Crimes and Security

3 credits
This course offers an introduction to information systems used within the national security system. A framework is provided for understanding the needs, types, capabilities and applications of management information systems. An overview of existing security information systems is presented with implications for the future requirements. This course will provide an overview of computer crime and the procedures forensic computing specialists, law enforcement investigators, and prosecutors must invoke to prosecute computer criminals successfully. Finally, the impact of science and technology upon security agencies and how information management systems will prepare for the latest challenges will also be analyzed and discussed. (Cross-referenced to CJS 130)
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

HSM 131 - Data and Information System Security Protection

HSM 131 - Data and Information System Security Protection

3 credits
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to computer security, including computer networks, issues, concepts and technologies. The core technologies of access control, cryptography, digital signatures, authentication, network firewalls and network security services and programs are reviewed. Issues of security policy and risk management are considered. (Cross-referenced to CJS 131)
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

HSM 142 - Intelligence Analysis and Security Management

HSM 142 - Intelligence Analysis and Security Management

3 credits
This course examines intelligence analysis and its indispensable relationship to the security management of terrorist attacks, man-made disasters and natural disasters. It also explores vulnerabilities of our national defense and private sectors, as well as the threats posed to these institutions by terrorists, man-made disasters, and natural disasters. Students will discuss substantive issues regarding intelligence support of homeland security measures implemented by the United States and explore how the intelligence community operates. Students will be able to identify important components of Intelligence Analysis and Security Management.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSM 143 - Transportation and Border Security

HSM 143 - Transportation and Border Security

3 credits
This course provides an in-depth view of modern border and transportation security. Topics of study will include aircraft and airports; trains, ground transportation and related terminals; ships and seaports; and major border-crossing control points. Existing and emergent technologies needed to detect terrorists, their weapon, and inherent vulnerabilities in infrastructure will be a special emphasis of the course. Additional topics will include: legal, economic, political and cultural aspects of transportation safety and border security. The course will provide students with an understanding of the variety of challenges inherent in transportation and border security.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

HSM 220 - National Incident Management System (NIMS)

HSM 220 - National Incident Management System (NIMS)

3 credits
This course is designed to illustrate how effective coordination, integration, communications and planning among local, state and federal response agencies are critical to effective response to mass-casualty, Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) or terrorist incidents. This course will focus on the special challenges faced by senior level incident manages in dealing with a WMD or terrorist incident. In addition, the National Incident Management System (NIMS), Incident Command, basic medical and law enforcement terminology will be discussed.
Prerequisite(s): CJS/HSM 101
Offered: Spring

HSM 230 - Cyber Crime: Identity Theft and Internet Vulnerabilities

HSM 230 - Cyber Crime: Identity Theft and Internet Vulnerabilities

3 credits
This course will introduce and discuss the fastest growing crime - theft of a person's identity, the techniques and various ways criminals use to steal personal information. Prevention and ways to protect one's identity will be discussed. This course will also focus on the theories and techniques for tracking attackers across the Internet and gaining forensic information from computer systems. This course includes case studies of Internet-based computer crimes and addresses limits of forensic techniques. (Cross-referenced to CJS 230)
Prerequisite(s): CJS/HSM 130 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Spring

HSM 231 - Information System Threats/Attacks/Defense

HSM 231 - Information System Threats/Attacks/Defense

3 credits
This course provides an overview of the actors, motives and methods used in the commission of computer-related crimes and describes the methods used by organizations to prevent, detect, and respond to these crimes. (Cross-referenced to CJS 231)
Prerequisite(s): CJS/HSM 130
Offered: Summer

HSM 232 - Computer Crime Forensics and Investigative Procedures

HSM 232 - Computer Crime Forensics and Investigative Procedures

3 credits
This course presents an introduction to modern criminalistics and investigative techniques to solve crimes. The course includes an examination and evaluation of crime scenes with scientific analysis of physical evidence. Individual and group activities relating to professional practices of forensic science and computer science will be explored throughout the semester. (Cross-referenced to CJS 232)
Prerequisite(s): HSM 130
Offered: Spring

HSM 235 - Principals of Personal and Physical Security

HSM 235 - Principals of Personal and Physical Security

3 credits
This course will provide the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of personal and physical security to include the definitions, the need, the requirements, and review of the controls, techniques and tools. This course introduces participants to a broad, in-depth look at security planning and procedures. Students will develop skills in intelligence collection, surveillances, perimeter and crime scene security, principles of crowd and riot control, substance abuse recognition, theft, sabotage, and espionage. Additional topics may include computer security, electronic criminal investigations, firewalls and security software, as well as crime prevention techniques. (Cross-referenced to CJS 235)
Prerequisite(s): CJS 101 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Spring

HSM 240 - Strategic and Tactical Considerations on the Fireground

HSM 240 - Strategic and Tactical Considerations on the Fireground

3 credits
This course gives students a real-life approach to the topic of fire strategies and tactical considerations using a systems approach to guide them through the process of problem identification and solution response. From planning to incident scene control, this course provides knowledge that can be applied to a variety of complex fire situations including new material on Health Care and High Risk Populations and Commercial, Technical Operations, and Industrial Occupancies as well as scenarios, case studies to enhance student learning.
Prerequisite(s): HSM 118
Offered: Spring

HSM 241 - Principles of Fire Prevention

HSM 241 - Principles of Fire Prevention

3 credits
This course addresses our nation's efforts at fire prevention and the importance of reducing fire loss, and it helps students understand the value of fire prevention, protection and associated programs. Coverage includes the origins of our national, state, and local fire prevention efforts as well as current examples that emphasize the need for stronger programs. In addition, the course discusses the elements of plan review, inspection and investigation, as well as the logistics of staffing and financial management of fire prevention.
Prerequisite(s): HSM 118
Offered: Spring

HSM 275 - Research Project

HSM 275 - Research Project

3 credits
This course will require the student to identity an acceptable topic in homeland security, to conduct extensive research involving the identified thesis and result in a validated conclusion. With the instructor's approval, students may work individually or in small groups toward completion and presentation of the project.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or Departmental Permission
Offered: By Arrangement

HSM 290 - Internship

HSM 290 - Internship

3 credits
This course provides a supervised internship of at least 150 hours in order to gain practical field placement experience in the homeland security area including law enforcement, fire service, corrections, public/private sector safety or security, protective services environments, or other Homeland Security career fields. Transportation to internship sites is the responsibility of the student.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Human Services

HSR 101 - Introduction to Human Services

HSR 101 - Introduction to Human Services

3 credits
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the theory, knowledge, attitudes, values and skills necessary for one to become an effective human service professional. Topics include human services in the United States, historical perspectives in human services, populations served and needs addressed in human services. Students will also examine social policy and how various human services emerged and the forces that influenced their development. Human service careers, self-development and caring for oneself as a professional will also be addressed.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSR 105 - Community Organization and Advocacy

HSR 105 - Community Organization and Advocacy

3 credits
This course focuses on the practice of advocacy in human services. Students will learn key principles, strategies, and hands-on skills that are commonly used in advocacy in multiple settings. The course highlights strategies and tactics used in advocacy, and challenges and dilemmas organizers face in the field. Emphasis will be on agency, legislative, legal and community advocacy. Students will have an opportunity to design and execute an advocacy strategy within their areas of interest.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSR 108 - Introduction to Disability Studies

HSR 108 - Introduction to Disability Studies

3 credits
This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of disabilities and will examine the social, cultural, economic, environmental and political forces that for years have served to marginalize and oppress people with disabilities. Through readings, lectures, films, guest presentations, assignments and group discussions, students will learn about the history of disability studies, gain familiarity with disability organizations, services and policies, and analyze cultural attitudes and practices regarding people with disabilities. Topics include disability rights, relevant federal and state legislation and policies, legal and ethical issues, the delivery of services and support to people with disabilities, federal and state programs for persons with disabilities, disability culture and advocacy. Physical, emotional, mental and social dimensions throughout the lifespan will also be explored. Individuals with disabilities comprise approximately one-fifth of the total population of the Unites States and a greater understanding of disability is important professionally regardless of the field in which a professional plans to work.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSR 110 - Youth Development Practice

HSR 110 - Youth Development Practice

3 credits
This course provides students with an introduction to the origin, foundation, theory, framework and principles of youth development as well as a discussion of the history of the field of youth work. Current concepts and experiences that influence youth development will also be examined. Students will learn how to apply a holistic, assets-based approach to working with young people using a variety of models including the 40 Developmental Assets of Adolescents. Students will also examine the legal and ethical issues encountered by youth development professionals, including the importance of adhering to a code of professional ethics and establishing a balance between professional boundaries and personal rapport. Issues of confidentiality, agency protocol and mandated reporting laws will also be addressed. In addition, the status of youth development as a profession will be explored.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Summer

HSR 121 - Topics in Nonprofit Management

HSR 121 - Topics in Nonprofit Management

3 credits
This course explores management practices applied in nonprofit organizations. Topics will include short-term and strategic planning, decision making, fundamentals of organization, managing employees, board management, fundraising, legal and regulatory issues, program management and evaluation, ethics and leadership among other emerging management practices and issues.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 101, BUS 101 or BUS 105
Offered: Spring

HSR 200 - Personal Growth and Development

HSR 200 - Personal Growth and Development

3 credits
This course provides the student with an exploration into the bio-psycho-social events that have shaped their life thus far and the enhancement of personal development. Emphasis is placed on self-esteem and self-worth, relationships, cultural values, embracing diversity, meeting challenges of adulthood and autonomy, and pathways to personal growth. Course assignments, readings, journaling, and group work are designed to promote student’s oral and written skills, social interaction, and personal development.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSR 210 - Introduction to Research in Human Services

HSR 210 - Introduction to Research in Human Services

3 credits
This course will provide an overview of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies used in human services. Students will gain the knowledge and competencies necessary to evaluate existing research and to plan and conduct their own research in human services. Students will learn to prepare, plan, utilize research methods, organize and compose research papers on significant human service issues. The role of previous research and theory, experience, observation and related literature lead to the formulation of a hypothesis will also be explored. This knowledge will be applied to a unique written research project that will be presented in class.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 101, ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Summer

HSR 211 - Youth Development Connections

HSR 211 - Youth Development Connections

3 credits
This course will prepare students to assist youth in developing the skills and competencies they need to develop for successful adulthood. Students will learn how to develop youth programs that support and develop these skills and how to identify and access community youth services. In addition, students will learn how to implement case management techniques and strategies to foster positive youth development. Students will also learn how to assess the needs of youth and learn how to communicate effectively with youth and their families. Cultural considerations when working with youth will also be explored. Formerly listed as HSR 111.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSR 225 - Interviewing, Intake, and Information Management

HSR 225 - Interviewing, Intake, and Information Management

3 credits
This course will provide the student with an understanding of the basic concepts and methodologies of gathering, assessing and integrating relevant information concerning prospective clients in order to determine eligibility and facilitate admission to services. Students will study and apply various interviewing, intake and assessment techniques specifically used in the human services field as well as topics relevant to interviewing, such as confidentiality, recording of interviews and nonverbal communication. Students will learn the scope and variety of information that is collected and utilized in the delivery of basic human services as well as methods of determining the adequacy, appropriateness, accuracy and relevance of information, including information obtained from other sources. Ethical behavior related to conducting intakes and assessments will also be addressed. Both practical and theoretical perspectives will be examined in this course. Formerly listed as HSR 140.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 101
Offered: Fall, Summer

HSR 230 - Intro to Counseling

HSR 230 - Intro to Counseling

3 credits
This introductory counseling course is designed to acquaint the student with various theoretical and practical approaches to counseling. Students will explore the issues involved in building an effective counseling relationship including clarifying expectations, dealing effectively with conflict and establishing rapport with clients. In addition, students will learn how to prepare professional documentation related to the field of counseling. Students will develop introductory individual and group counseling skills and an awareness of how they apply to various populations typically served in the human services profession. This course provides a foundation for students to take advanced counseling courses such as individual and group counseling. Formerly listed as HSR 106.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 101
Offered: Spring

HSR 250 - Studies in Alcohol and Drug Abuse

HSR 250 - Studies in Alcohol and Drug Abuse

3 credits
This course prepares students to identify, analyze and explain the impact of substance abuse on individuals, families and communities. Students will study the major models and practices for drug and alcohol abuse rehabilitation including the basic elements of assessment; individual, group and family counseling; and, case management in substance abuse treatment. In addition, students will learn the major drug classifications including their physiological and psychological impact on the user as well as the ramifications of drug and alcohol abuse as it relates to the work environment. Formerly listed as HSR 120.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

HSR 260 - Issues in Gerontology

HSR 260 - Issues in Gerontology

3 credits
This course focuses on the major issues that people face as they age and become elderly. It explores the needs of older adults, their families, partners and others in their support systems. Challenges related to retirement, health, financial security, transportation, and housing will be studied from social, service delivery and community resource perspectives. Major support systems and resources for the aged will be identified and examined as well as political issues that affect the elderly. End of life issues including social practices related to dying, death and bereavement will also be explored. Formerly listed as HSR 125.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSR 299 - Human Services Internship

HSR 299 - Human Services Internship

4 credits
This course is a 180-hour practical field experience that is based on the theories and learning outcomes associated with the overall human services curricula. It provides an opportunity for students to blend theory and practice through an actual supervised work experience in a human services organization Students will be supervised in selected human service settings under the direction of the staff of the organization and college faculty. Specific learning objectives for the experience will be developed through a collaboration of the student, host organization representative and faculty member. In addition to the 180-hour field experience, students will be required to participate in a bi-weekly seminar, led by various staff members, to further integrate prior classroom learning and internship experiences.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSR 312 - Youth: Challenges and Interventions

HSR 312 - Youth: Challenges and Interventions

3 credits
This course examines the range of crises confronting today’s youth and strategies to help them overcome those challenges. Students will explore the impact of drug and alcohol abuse, sexual and physical abuse, bullying, neglect and abandonment, pregnancy, gangs, peer pressure and other issues confronting youth. Particular focus will be on identifying issues, building effective relationships, implementing positive interventions, advocating for needed services, connecting with community resources, promoting positive behavior, and helping youth to develop self-esteem, self-advocacy skills.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 230
Offered: Summer

HSR 320 - Health and Social Issues in Aging

HSR 320 - Health and Social Issues in Aging

3 credits
This course will explore health issue of the aging adult, including biological and environmental factors that may impede upon ones quality of life and also investigates the socialization of the aging population in the 21st century. This course provides the student with an understanding of health issues, social interactions, relationships, and cognitive functions of the aging population.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered:Fall

HSR 325 - Case Management

HSR 325 - Case Management

3 credits
This course covers the range of functions associated with case management in human services settings. Topics include service planning, needs assessment, referral procedures and follow-up and integration of services. Upon completion, students should be able to effectively manage the care of the whole person from initial contact through termination of services. Students will learn to integrate and utilize information obtained through intakes, assessments, and from other service providers to determine client needs and develop service plans. Emphasis will be placed on designing interventions based on the goals of those receiving services and evaluating the outcomes of the service provided. Organizing and documenting information will be covered as well as the written and oral presentation of that information to all relevant stakeholders. Students will develop skills in managing multiple aspects of human service interventions in dual roles of coordinator and provider of direct services. Coordination with and referral to other service providers will be addressed and the role and importance of professional ethics will also be incorporated. Formerly listed as HSR 202.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 101 and ENG 101
Offered: Fall, Summer

HSR 330 - Rehabilitation Counseling

HSR 330 - Rehabilitation Counseling

3 credits
This course provides the student with an understanding of the field and practice of rehabilitation counseling. It is designed to help students understand and work to overcome the barriers to full participation of people with disabilities in the community and society.The major elements encompassing the rehabilitation service system will be explored including the federally legislated state/federal program, the not-for-profit community, rehabilitation programs, and the private for profit rehabilitation counseling business. The course will address the disability rights movement and the history of significant disability-related legislation as well as the scope of practice in rehabilitation counseling. Students will study the professional issues related to the role of the rehabilitation counselor, the process of rehabilitation, and develop an understanding of a wide-range of techniques and methodologies utilized by professional rehabilitation counselors.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 230, HSR 108
Offered: Spring

HSR 335 - Social Welfare Policy

HSR 335 - Social Welfare Policy

3 credits
This course investigates the historical and philosophical roots of social welfare from ancient cultures to contemporary America. Students will experience an in-depth analysis of current social and public policies that impact community, state, and federal agencies and organizations. This course will generate student knowledge related to design and management of service programs and situations within a constantly changing political and social environment.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HSR 350 - Crisis Prevention and Intervention

HSR 350 - Crisis Prevention and Intervention

3 credits
This course provides an introduction to the theories, principles, concepts and techniques of crisis theory and practice carried out in a variety of human service environments. The range of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses of those experiencing crises will be explored. Effective crisis management is explored to learn how people feel, think, and behave during periods of crisis, and what strategies and resources are available to them. Specific types of crises are reviewed (e.g. developmental, crises of abuse, trauma, grief and loss) and the student will learn typical intervention strategies for various crisis situations. Finally, the student will learn about professional challenges associated with conducting crisis intervention work and issues such as compassion, fatigue and stress management.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 230 Introduction to Counseling
Offered: Summer

HSR 410 - Advanced Research in Human Services

HSR 410 - Advanced Research in Human Services

3 credits
In this course students will learn about scientifically based research and how to apply quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods of analysis to research. Students will include a conceptual frame that drives the student’s research. Students will learn how to select a research design appropriate to their intended area of research, conduct a review of the literature related to the research and construct research questions and a hypothesis. In addition, students will learn how to interpret results of research, summarize research findings, and utilize research findings in typical human services applications. Students will have an understanding of statistical data analysis and data collecting. The student will also provide sections of timelines, limitations, reliability and validity. Students will conduct original research in an area of interest within the field of human services and write a research report utilizing traditional elements of research reporting.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 210 and Math 100 or higher
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSR 425 - Program Design, Implementation and Evaluation

HSR 425 - Program Design, Implementation and Evaluation

3 credits
This course is designed to prepare students to identify unmet human needs, problems and barriers to quality of life and to conceptualize services and interventions that could address them. Students will learn to conduct needs assessments, design programs and services to meet those needs, identify funding sources and how to secure funding, develop budgets, plan for staffing requirements, and understand legal, regulatory, policy and procedural issues pertaining to the development and operation of a program. In addition, students will learn methodologies and techniques to design, implement and utilize systems for evaluating the effectiveness, efficiency, goals relating to the process and outcomes of the program and other indicators of program success. In addition, students will understand how to identify the various stakeholders of the program, how to obtain and utilize feedback from them, and how to effectively communicate program.
Prerequisite(s): BUS 107 and HSR 101
Offered: Summer

HSR 495 - Human Services Capstone

HSR 495 - Human Services Capstone

6 credits
The Human Services Capstone is an in-depth, student-centered course that requires the student to perform a 180-hour fieldwork experience where they will integrate the knowledge, theory, skills and professional behaviors that they have learned in the classroom. Utilizing this experience, students will identify and conduct a final research project. The student will explore, research, evaluate, and theorize a focused area of his/her interest within the human services field. Topics may include a specific population issue, current problem, information gap, culturally diverse client populations or a student/organization identified service need.
Prerequisite(s): HSR 410 or Program Director’s approval; Enrolled in final semester
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

HSR 499 - Presentation of Competence in Human Services

HSR 499 - Presentation of Competence in Human Services

1 credit
During the final semester before graduation students will sit for a ‘presentation of competence’ before faculty members and representatives of the Human Services Program Advisory Board. At the presentation, students will submit documentation, make a formal presentation and be asked questions designed to assess their mastery of the Human Services program outcomes. It is expected that students will spend a considerable amount of time preparing for this presentation and should draw extensively on work accomplished in previous courses, application of critical thinking skills, and integration of field experiences and coursework. Each student will be assigned a faculty advisor for this course. The scheduling of the presentation will be determined collaboratively between the student and faculty advisor.
Prerequisite(s): Enrolled in the final semester leading to the BSHS degree
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Humanities

HUM 100 - Introduction to the Humanities

HUM 100 - Introduction to the Humanities

3 credits
This course provides a multi-disciplinary introduction to a global view of the arts and humanities. The emphasis of the course is on the interaction of art, poetry, literature, philosophy, music, and dance with the social issues of all cultures considered. C
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring

HUM 150 - Fundamental of Art Techniques

HUM 150 - Fundamental of Art Techniques

3 credits
This hands-on course introduces students to the creative experience in a variety of art forms, including drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture, and architecture. The course is designed to help students develop their own creative and plastic skills; understand the elements and the principles of design; and appreciate the aesthetic and humanist values of the arts. Classes will be a combination of lectures and hands-on projects. This course offers a practical approach to rationalizing many of the facets that visual art has to offer. C
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

HUM 201 - Music History and Appreciation

HUM 201 - Music History and Appreciation

3 credits
This course intensively covers development of classical orchestral music, vocal music, opera, and ballet. Topics include modern dance, musical theater, jazz, and hip-hop. This course employs recordings, visual presentations, lectures, and discussions. Students are exposed to a wide variety of music forms; develop their own critical judgment and tastes in music and evaluate the impact of music on culture and their own lives. Formerly listed as HUM 101. C mc
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Summer

HUM 202 - Art History and Appreciation

HUM 202 - Art History and Appreciation

3 credits
This course introduces students to the arts, especially painting, sculpture, and architecture, from antiquity to the present. Students will develop their own aesthetic and humanist values, understand the elements and principles of design, and appreciate the arts. Formerly listed as HUM 102. C mc
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

HUM 204 - Modern Popular Music: America and the World

HUM 204 - Modern Popular Music: America and the World

3 credits
This course covers the development of contemporary music from its roots in early jazz to swing, bebop, rock, blues and country, rap, pop and music of the new millennium. It considers 20th Century music from a musical as well as a social, cultural, economic and political perspective in American and world society. Finally, it examines the relationship of specific issues of race, gender, ethnicity and age as they relate to contemporary music. Formerly listed as MUS 101 - Contemporary Music. Formerly listed as HUM 104. C mc
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

HUM 242 - World Cultures and Foods: Italy

HUM 242 - World Cultures and Foods: Italy

3 credits
This course combines a sampling of Italian regional cooking with the history, language, music, culture and traditions of the Italian people. Each class begins with a short exercise in Italian vocabulary and key phrases, then focuses on a prepared meal from one of the many regions of Italy, and the economic and geographic factors influencing the food of that area. The remainder of each class considers many aspects of Italian culture. Formerly listed as IS 142. C mc
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring

HUM 311 - Greek Tragedy in Translation

HUM 311 - Greek Tragedy in Translation

3 credits
This course examines the extant tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the world which frames these works; includes philosophical issues of determinism and free will, moral law and man-made law, human nature under incredible strain, changing relationships of friendship and enmity, and overweening pride bred of success. Students will consider the evolution and conventions of Greek drama and its influence on later literature, music, and film. (Cross-referenced with ENG 311) C mc
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & ENG 102
Offered: Fall

Back to the top


IS

IS 110 - Portfolio Review for Experiential Learning and Credit

IS 110 - Portfolio Review for Experiential Learning and Credit

1 credit
Students learn how to organize, assess and articulate knowledge and skills acquired through work and other life experiences and relate that learning to specific college-level curricula. Student will develop a Credit for Lifelong Learning Portfolio that they may submit to an Assessment Committee for possible award of college credit.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of Transfer Counselor
Offered: Summer

IS 150 - Career Planning and Development

IS 150 - Career Planning and Development

3 credits
This course presents practical strategies that prepare students to confirm an appropriate career, to conduct a successful job search, and to lay the foundation for successful career development. Emphasis is on Career Action assignments to assess your skills and interests, to research prospective employers, to learn about current application requirements, to prepare resumes and cover letters, to practice meeting with business people in your targeted career field, and to practice interviewing. These assignments polish job search and career management skills so students can apply them directly to achieving immediate and future career goals.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

IS 160 - Service Learning

IS 160 - Service Learning

3 credits
In this course, students will engage in public service in partnership with agencies or organizations in the Greater Hartford area. Through written work and class discussions, they will reflect on both the purposes of that work and also on how that work responds to specific needs within the community and within the more general context of social justice. Students will also explore issues of social responsibility and citizenship in the professions and business world in relation to the social problems they encounter through their community work. Class may be either online or on ground.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

IS 170 - Urban Limits

IS 170 - Urban Limits

3 credits
This course will engage students in an interactive study of Hartford and the surrounding metropolitan area. Course readings and assignments will provide students with the opportunity to view Hartford through a cultural, historical, and sociological lens. Students will study the city's history, music, art, architecture, and current government structure. C, mc
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

IS 289, 389 or 489 – Independent Study

IS 289, 389 or 489 – Independent Study

3-12 credits
This course provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct an in-depth study/project within their major field of study under the guidance of a faculty mentor and with permission of the department chairperson. The faculty and chair determine the appropriate level of the Independent Study. Independent Study Contracts are available from the Registrar’s office. Students should meet with their faculty mentor to discuss the proposed study and to obtain approval prior to registering for the course. Independent Studies must meet all the requirements outlined in the Goodwin College Catalog.
Prerequisite(s): DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Math

MATH 095 - Foundations of College Mathematics

MATH 095 - Fundamentals of College Mathematics

0 credits
This course develops the basic mathematical skills required for all subsequent mathematics courses. Topics include whole numbers, estimation, rounding, order of operations, exponents, fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, percents, perimeter, area, volume, square roots, Pythagorean Theorem, signed numbers, algebraic expressions, solving linear equations in one variable, introduction to graphing linear equations in two variables, and introduction to probability and statistics. This is a competency-based course that takes place in a math lab and utilizes online instructional software along with on-demand, personalized assistance from the instructor and other math lab personnel. Students work at their own pace toward weekly curriculum targets. Students must show competency on 10 curriculum modules. Students have access to videos, assignments, and quizzes both in the math lab and also from any computer with internet access. The class meets weekly at a scheduled time for 3 hours in the math lab. Each student is also expected to spend a minimum of 2 additional hours in the math lab at their convenience during math lab hours. Math 095 does not count towards credit requirement for any certificate or degree program.
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MATH 095 - Foundations of College Mathematics

MATH 095 - Fundamentals of College Mathematics

0 credits
This course develops the basic mathematical skills required for all subsequent mathematics courses. Topics include whole numbers, estimation, rounding, order of operations, exponents, fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, percents, perimeter, area, volume, square roots, Pythagorean Theorem, signed numbers, algebraic expressions, solving linear equations in one variable, introduction to graphing linear equations in two variables, and introduction to probability and statistics. This is a competency-based course that takes place in a math lab and utilizes online instructional software along with on-demand, personalized assistance from the instructor and other math lab personnel. Students work at their own pace toward weekly curriculum targets. Students must show competency on 10 curriculum modules. Students have access to videos, assignments, and quizzes both in the math lab and also from any computer with internet access. The class meets weekly at a scheduled time for 3 hours in the math lab. Each student is also expected to spend a minimum of 2 additional hours in the math lab at their convenience during math lab hours. Math 095 does not count towards credit requirement for any certificate or degree program.
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MATH 096 - Fundamentals of College Mathematics

MATH 096 - Fundamentals of College Mathematics

0 credits
This course is a continuation of Math 095 for those students who have completed at least 7 curriculum modules. The class meets weekly for 7 weeks for 3 hours in the math lab. Each student is also expected to spend a minimum of 2 additional hours in the math lab at their convenience during math lab hours. Math 096 does not count towards credit requirement for any certificate or degree programs.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 7 curriculum modules in Math 095. A curriculum module is complete when the student scores 75% or higher on the module test.
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MATH 099 - Introduction to College Mathematics

MATH 099 - Introduction to College Mathematics

0 credits
This course provides the skills necessary for our college mathematics courses. Topics include signed numbers, algebraic expressions, first-degree equations (one variable), properties of exponents, and an introduction to solving and graphing linear equations. This course does not count towards credit requirements for any certificate or degree programs. Formerly listed as Introduction to Algebra.
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score or "C" or better in MATH 098
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MATH 125 - Mathematical Applications for the Health Sciences

MATH 125 - Mathematical Applications for the Health Sciences

3 credits
This course is designed for those entering the health professions. It is an application-based problem solving approach to mathematical processes used in health related fields. Students solve linear equations, become proficient at converting a measure given in one unit to an equivalent measure in a related unit calculate a variety of prescribed dosage amounts, determine intravenous flow rates, and learn the proper preparation of solutions. Students read measuring instruments, including scales, thermometers, sphygmomanometer gauges, and syringes. A
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score or completion of MATH 099 with a "C" or better
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MATH 130 - Mathematics for Science and Technology

MATH 130 - Mathematics for Science and Technology

3 credits
This course provides the underlying mathematical concepts and processes applied in the fields of science and the technologies. Topics include scientific notation, the U.S. and metric systems of measurement, solving equations and graphing functions, perimeters, areas, volumes, the Pythagorean Theorem, logarithms, and right triangle trigonometry. A scientific calculator is required for this course. A
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score or completion of MATH 099 with a "C" or better
Offered: Fall, Spring

MATH 135 - Contemporary Mathematics

MATH 135 - Contemporary Mathematics

3 credits
A survey of a wide range of topics with an emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving, giving the student the opportunity to apply mathematics to the solution of everyday problems. Includes simplifying algebraic expressions, solving linear and literal equations, graphing, problem solving with proportions and percents, perimeter, area, volume and unit conversion in both U.S. and metric units, discount, simple and compound interest, credit purchases, mortgages, and an introduction to probability. A basic calculator is required for this course. A
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score or completion of MATH 099 with a "C" or better
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MATH 186 - Precalculus

MATH 186 - Precalculus

3 credits
This course is for students who want to expand on their advanced mathematics skills and acquire the foundation for Calculus. This course is especially appropriate for those pursuing careers in any of the sciences, engineering, business, pharmacy, economics, or technologies. Topics included are linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and applications thereof. A scientific calculator is required and a graphing calculator will be very helpful. A
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score or completion of MATH 125 with a "C" or better
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MATH 254 - Introductory Calculus

MATH 254 - Introductory Calculus

4 credits
This course is for students who are interested in continuing their study of advanced mathematics. It is especially appropriate for those interested in any of the math-related fields including any of the sciences, engineering, pharmacy, business, economics, or technologies. Topics included are limits, continuity, the derivative and its applications. A graphing calculator is required for this course. A
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score or completion of MATH 186 with a "C" or better
Offered: Spring, Summer

MATH 255 - Calculus II

MATH 255 - Calculus II

4 credits
This is a second course in Calculus and intended for students who are interested in continuing their study of advanced mathematics. It is especially appropriate for those interested in any of the math-related fields including any of the sciences, engineering, pharmacy, business, economics, or technologies. Topics included are integration, differential equations, applications of integration, integration techniques, improper integrals, sequences and series, conics, parametric equations and polar coordinates. A graphing calculator is required for this course. A
Prerequisite(s): Placement evaluation score or completion of Math 254 with a grade of “C” or better.
Offered: Spring

Back to the top


Medical Billing and Coding

MCD 213 - CPT ®-4 Coding I

MCD 213 - CPT ®-4 Coding I

3 credits
This course teaches the student to translate medical services, treatments, and procedures into a uniform numerical language to facilitate communication among healthcare providers and third-party payers. This course will concentrate on the 5-digit CPT codes and descriptors nomenclature in the areas of Evaluation and Management, Anesthesia, and Surgical Procedures. Healthcare Common Procedural Coding (HCPCS) and modifiers will also be emphasized.
Corequisite(s): MED 115
Offered: Spring, Summer

MCD 214 - CPT ®-4 Coding II

MCD 214 - CPT ®-4 Coding II

3 credits
This course teaches the student Anesthesia, Radiology, Laboratory/ Pathology, and Medicine Coding. Emphasis will be on accuracy in coding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.
Corequisite(s): MED 115
Offered: Spring, Summer

MCD 215 - ICD-9- CM Coding

MCD 215 - ICD-9- CM Coding

3 credits
This course concentrates on transforming verbal descriptions of diseases, injuries, and conditions into numerical designations, also known as Coding. Students will learn the complex activity of diagnostic coding and its relationship to facilitate payment of healthcare services
Corequisite(s): MED 115
Offered: Spring, Summer

MCD 220 - Medical Coding Capstone

MCD 220 - Medical Coding Capstone

3 credits
This course is designed to prepare the student to sit for the Certified Processional Coding exam given by the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC). The course enables the student to conduct an in-depth study of diagnoses (ICD-9) and procedural (CPT-4) coding. The emphasis will be on accurately coding medical and operative reports using ICD-9-CM and CPT-4 coding guidelines and conventions.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Summer

MCD 299 - Medical Billing and Coding Internship

MCD 299 - Medical Billing and Coding Internship

3 credits
Students may elect to enroll in this 3 credit internship with permission of the department chair. Students will gain hands-on training in a billing and coding environment. This course provides students with the opportunity to utilize previously studied subjects and related skills. This opportunity provides the student with valuable employment experience and increased marketability.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Medical Assisting

MED 115 - Introduction to Medical Insurance and Coding

MED 115 - Introduction to Medical Insurance and Coding

3 credits
This 45-hour course will introduce students to insurance terminology, types of insurance, and the eligibility and benefit structure of the insurance plan. The student will then utilize this knowledge to analyze and calculate patient medical insurance benefits for a variety of insurance types. In addition, this course will introduce the student to International Classification of Disease, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) and Current Procedural Terminology 4th Revision, (CPT®-4). Students will also gain an appreciation of the relationship between coding and financial reimbursement. Topics discussed include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Medicare compliance issues, billing forms and applications.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): HSC 105
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MED 151 - Medical Assisting: The Medical Office and Patient Care

MED 151 - Medical Assisting: The Medical Office and Patient Care

3 credits
This 60-hour course is designed to introduce the student to basic medical procedures; the student will gain an understanding of the cycle of infection, principles of medical asepsis, and importance of Universal Precautions. The student will also be taught how to create and maintain a medical record, including requirements for documenting in a medical record. The student will learn to accurately obtain and record vital signs, common mensurations, and patient information. The proper documentation in the medical record of these measurements will also be emphasized. Lastly, the student will learn to assist the physician with both an adult and pediatric history and physical exam, as well as establishing and maintaining the examination room.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MED 152 - Medical Assisting: Diagnostic Procedures

MED 152 - Medical Assisting: Diagnostic Procedures

3 credits
This 60-hour course is designed to teach the student about various medical specialties and procedures; including Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ophthalmology, and Otolaryngology. In addition, students will become familiar with electrocardiography, radiology, and introduced to various first aid procedures. Students also learn various minor office procedure techniques.
Prerequisite(s): MED 151
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MED 153 - Medical Assisting: Laboratory Procedures

MED 153 - Medical Assisting: Laboratory Procedures

3 credits
This 60-hour course is designed to fully acquaint the student to the clinical laboratory. The curriculum will focus on laboratory safety and skills. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regulations will be introduced. Guidelines for handling, transporting, and recording of lab specimens will be reviewed. The analysis of urine and its significance in total patient care will be theorized and applied. The student will learn and apply the theory of venipuncture and the various methods of performance. An overview of Hematology, Chemistry, and Microbiology will complete the curriculum.
Prerequisite(s): MED 151
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MED 212 - Pharmacology

MED 212 - Pharmacology

3 credits
From this 45-hour course, students will gain an understanding of drug sources, legislation relating to drugs, and drug references. Forms of drugs, drug classification and actions, and schedules of controlled drugs will also be covered. The medication order, identifying commonly prescribed medications, and basic principles for the administration of medications will be emphasized. The laboratory component of the course provides practical application of the student's knowledge. Basic mathematical skills necessary for the safe preparation and administration of medications to adult and pediatric patients will be reviewed.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MED 250 - Medical Office Management

MED 250 - Medical Office Management

3 credits
This 60-hour course is a medical office simulation where students will be able to successfully manage a mock medical practice. Students will learn Students will have the opportunity to complete all aspects of the billing process from registration to filing of the insurance claim. Medical office procedures, including scheduling appointments, accounting, mail processing, and confidentiality regulations are also covered.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

MED 299 - Medical Assisting Internship

MED 299 - Medical Assisting Internship

3 credits
The Medical Assisting Internship course is the culminating course of the Medical Assisting Program. During a 160-hour internship students are provided with hands-on training and career-related experience. This course provides an extensive on-site experience in a physician's office, clinic, or other appropriate health care setting that allows the medical assisting student to utilize previously studied subjects and related skills. It gives the student the opportunity to put his/her class knowledge to practical use and to practice and enhance acquired skills. It provides students with valuable employment experience, increasing their marketability.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Nursing

NUR 100 - Nursing Skill Development

NUR 100 - Nursing Skill Development

6 credits
This initial course provides the student with the fundamental skills for nursing practice. Concepts focus on human beings and their responses to the environment. The continuum of wellness is introduced in Nursing 100. Foundational concepts related to the nursing process are identified and defined. Special emphasis is placed on the development of basic communication skills, client physical and psychosocial assessment and specific nursing skills related to nursing interventions. Clinical experiences are provided in the nursing skills laboratory and in non-acute client care settings.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 212
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NUR 110 - Adults and the Wellness Continuum I

NUR 110 - Adults and the Wellness Continuum I

6 credits
This course provides the student with experiences in the care of adults with alterations in health status related to basic physical and psychological function. Emphasis is on care of adults with health problems related to nutrition, fluid and electrolyte balance, oxygenation, elimination, cardiac function and surgical procedures. Nutrition, pharmacotherapy, client teaching and ethico-legal issues are integrated throughout the course. Clinical experiences are provided in the nursing skills laboratory and in acute care settings.
Prerequisite(s): NUR 100 & BIO 235
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NUR 195 - LPN Bridge Course

NUR 195 - LPN Bridge Course

1 credit
This course is taken by Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) who have been accepted into the Associate Degree Nursing Program and have completed the 12 credit NUR 190 course through Charter Oak College. This One credit course covers the key concepts of NUR 100 and NUR 110 and validates nursing skills. Taking this course is part of the state's articulation process and enables the student to advance place in NUR 200.
Prerequisite(s): NUR 190 AT Charter Oak State College

NUR 200 - Adults and the Wellness Continuum II

NUR 200 - Adults and the Wellness Continuum II

7 credits
This course provides students with experiences in the care of adults with alterations in health status related to sensorimotor, musculo-skeletal, protective, endocrine, renal and reproductive function. Blood disorders, including human immunodeficiency disease, and burns will also be covered. The focus is on care of adults experiencing disruptions in health status associated with both acute and chronic health conditions. Students learn to apply the nursing process to maintain wellness levels, restore clients to previous levels of wellness and prevent further alterations in health status. Nutrition, pharmacotherapy, client teaching and ethico-legal issues are integrated throughout the course. Clinical experiences are provided in the nursing skills laboratory and in acute and chronic care settings.
Prerequisite(s): NUR 110
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NUR 210 - Families and the Wellness Continuum Across the Lifespan

NUR 210 - Families and the Wellness Continuum Across the Lifespan

7 credits
This course introduces the student to the concept of family-centered care across the lifespan. It focuses on care of childbearing, childrearing and aging families. Physiological, psychosocial and spiritual dimensions of developmental stages of clients and families are explored and community-based resources are emphasized. Students learn to use the nursing process to promote and maintain health, prevent alterations in health care status and restore clients to previous levels of wellness. Nutrition, pharmacotherapy, client teaching and ethico-legal issues are integrated throughout the course. Clinical experiences are provided within acute, non-acute and long-term care settings.
Prerequisite(s): NUR 200
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NUR 220 - Integration of Nursing Practice: Adults with Complex Health Problems

NUR 220 - Integration of Nursing Practice: Adults with Complex Health Problems

9 credits
This culminating nursing course provides students with experiences designed to promote the integration of nursing methods in the care of adults experiencing complex alterations in physical and psychological health function. Students use the nursing process to promote restoration and rehabilitation and assist clients in achieving optimal levels of wellness. Emphasis is on care of clients with alterations in health related to neurological health, sepsis, cancer, multi-system failure, mental health and trauma. Nursing responsibilities in bio-terrorism and emergency preparedness are included. All nursing skills, including application of therapeutic and pharmacological modalities, psychomotor skills, teaching and communication are included and critical thinking and ethico-legal considerations are integrated. Clinical experiences provide opportunity for establishing priorities, decision-making, achieving increasing independence and care management in the provision of client care and are provided in acute, in-patient medical-surgical, psychiatric and rehabilitation settings.
Prerequisite(s): NUR 210
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NUR 300 - Foundations of Professional Nursing

NUR 300 - Foundations of Professional Nursing

3 credits
This initial Nursing course introduces and orients the BSN student to the Nursing Conceptual Framework at Goodwin College, to baccalaureate nursing education and professional nursing practice. The role and expectations of the baccalaureate-prepared RN are explored and integrated into personal professional practice. This is a hybrid course. Classes will be held on line and meet a minimum of twice on campus within the semester. Articulation credits will be awarded when student satisfactorily (C+ or higher) completes this course. Formerly known as NUR 245.
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the BSN nursing program.
Offered: Fall, Spring

NUR 310 - Health Assessment

NUR 310 - Health Assessment

3 credits
This course builds on the professional nurse's theoretical knowledge and skills necessary to perform a comprehensive health assessment. The focus will build skills of history taking and physical examination of clients across the life span. Each student will have the opportunity to perform a focused examination under the observation of the instructor. The Goodwin College Nursing Theoretical Framework and the Nursing Process will provide the basis to promote health and prevent/manage illness of the client. This is a hybrid course. Classes will be held on line and meet a minimum of twice on campus within the semester.
Prerequisite/Corequisite: NUR 300
Offered: Fall, Spring

NUR 350 - Seminar in Nursing Research

NUR 350 - Seminar in Nursing Research

3 credits
Course introduces the research process and its application to scholarship and evidenced-based nursing practice. Qualitative and Quantitative methods are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and writing. This course enhances the student's ability to apply and integrate nursing conceptual frameworks, clinical research and evidenced-based practice. Student is prepared to be an informed consumer of nursing research. This is a hybrid course; Classes will be held on line and meet a minimum of twice on campus within the semester. r
Prerequisite(s)/Corequisite(s): STAT 167; NUR 300
Offered: Spring

NUR 361 - Public and Community Health Nursing

NUR 361 - Public and Community Health Nursing

3 credits
This course focuses on the client as a health care consumer and member of a community. The student will apply the Goodwin Nursing Conceptual framework to meet the needs of the client as well as the needs of the community. This course will focus on the role the nurse has in establishing partnerships with the public health system in customizing therapeutic care in order to protect, promote and restore optimal public and community health within the local, national and international domains. This is a hybrid course. Classes will be held on line and meet a minimum of twice on campus within the semester. This is a course that requires 45 clinical hours. mc
Prerequisite(s) NUR 300
Offered: Summer

NUR 363 - Clinical Nursing Leadership

NUR 363 - Clinical Nursing Leadership

3 credits
The focus of this course is on the professional nurse as a change agent in the clinical setting to positively influence the patient's level of wellness. Review of the local and national systems and how they affect the practice of nursing and ultimately, patient outcomes will be analyzed. Utilizing the Goodwin College Wellness Model and criteria from Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, students will develop, an evidence-based practice change for the clinical setting. This course allows the nurse to apply and integrate previously learned skills in research, leadership, management, and nursing and to transition to a more independent practitioner. This hybrid course will be held on line and meet a minimum of twice on campus.
Prerequisite(s) NUR 300
Offered: Spring

NUR 378 - Pharmacology in Nursing Practice

NUR 378 - Pharmacology in Nursing Practice

3 credits
This 12 week hybrid course is designed for the student who desires to elevate their level of theoretical knowledge of pharmacotherapeutics, and to establish an enhanced knowledge base for nursing management and patient/family education in relation to pharmacology. Significant focus will be placed on core pharmacology concepts; pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, therapeutic uses of medications, and adverse reactions. The nursing process, cultural considerations, and age-appropriate techniques are utilized throughout the course. This course will meet a minimum of twice on campus.
Prerequisite(s) NUR 300
Offered: Summer

NUR 441 - Career Exploration

NUR 441 - Career Exploration

3 credits
An individually designed experience by student and faculty, to give the student the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge in a select field of nursing. This course includes 90 hours of clinical work and a research paper.
Prerequisite(s) NUR 300
Offered: By arrangement, one semester in advance

NUR 460 - Seminar in Professional Nursing Leadership

NUR 460 - Seminar in Professional Nursing Leadership

3 credits
In this final required nursing course, the student will synthesize and apply basic concepts and theories needed for the effective management of client care as a professional nurse. Student analyzes organizational dynamics in relation to the theories of leadership and management. Review of case studies provides the foundation of theory integration. This is a hybrid course. Classes will be held on line and meet a minimum of twice on campus within the semester.
Prerequisite(s) NUR 300
Offered: Spring

NUR 468 - Contemporary Topics in Nursing

NUR 468 - Contemporary Topics in Nursing

3 credits
This course allows the student to investigate a topic, issue or area related to or affecting nursing practice or the profession of nursing. Course will enhance skills in systematic investigation, literature review, critical thinking and other activities designed to seek increased understanding of the topic. This course is a hybrid course. Classes will be held on line and meet a minimum of twice on campus within the semester.
Prerequisite(s) NUR 300
Offered: Spring

NUR 468 - Contemporary Topics in Nursing

NUR 468 - Contemporary Topics in Nursing

3 credits
This course allows the student to investigate a topic, issue or area related to or affecting nursing practice or the profession of nursing. Course will enhance skills in systematic investigation, literature review, critical thinking and other activities designed to seek increased understanding of the topic. This course is a hybrid course. Classes will be held on line and meet a minimum of twice on campus within the semester.
Prerequisite(s) NUR 300
Offered: Spring

NUR 470 - Nursing Study Abroad

NUR 470 - Nursing Study Abroad

3 credits
This independent study provides the student with the opportunity to have a short term study abroad experience. The student will study health care and professional nursing in an international environment. This course is intended for the student who is volunteering for a medical mission to a country outside the USA.
Prerequisite(s) NUR 300
Offered: By arrangement, one semester in advance

Back to the top


Ophthalmic Science

OPS 101 – Introduction to Ophthalmic Science

OPS 101 – Introduction to Ophthalmic Science

3 credits
This course in Ophthalmic Science will introduce students to the field of opticianry, optical terminology, related careers in eye care, professional ethics, dispensing theory, prescription analysis, and state and national opticianry regulations.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program
Corequisite(s): "C" or better in BIO 214
Offered: Fall

OPS 103 – Ophthalmic Fabrication I

OPS 103 – Ophthalmic Fabrication I

3 credits
First essential course in how to create eyewear based on a doctor’s prescription and a patient’s visual needs. This course begins by providing a knowledge base in applied geometric and ophthalmic optics, progressing through ophthalmic materials, and culminating in direct observations of fabrication and equipment.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program
Offered: Fall

OPS 105 – Ophthalmic Dispensing I

OPS 105 – Ophthalmic Dispensing I

3 credits
First essential course in how to dispense eyewear. Topics covered include frame and lens selection, lens positioning, measuring inter-pupillary distance, and segment height. In this course, students will practice on each other in the training store prior to working with actual patients.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program
Offered: Spring

OPS 106 – Contact Lens Theory I

OPS 106 – Contact Lens Theory I

3 credits
First essential course in contact lens theory. This course will introduce students to the history and development of contact lenses, comparison of contact lens materials, recent developments in the field, and instrumentation commonly used in contact lens fitting.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program
Offered: Summer

OPS 201 – Ophthalmic Science Synthesis

OPS 201 – Ophthalmic Science Synthesis

3 credits
Using a service learning approach, students will create eyewear for needy populations while perfecting skills and capabilities required to pass the state licensure examination. Curriculum to include: Review of all concepts presented in the program, practical application of ophthalmic fabrication, dispensing, and record keeping, review of CT statutes governing opticians, review of Pathology slides, and preparation for state licensure examination. This course should be taken during a student's final semester.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program
Offered: Spring

OPS 202 – Supervised Clinical Experience

OPS 202 – Supervised Clinical Experience

3 credits
Students will gain practical experience through a 150 hour field experience. The student will keep a reflective notebook. The Course Coordinator will visit each supervising establishment no less that twice per semester.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program
Offered: Spring

OPS 203 – Ophthalmic Fabrication II

OPS 203 – Ophthalmic Fabrication II

4 credits
This course puts concepts mastered in OPS 103 into practice through use of the Eyewear Manufacturing Laboratory. Topics include lens fabrication, inspection of single vision and multifocal lenses. Optical calculations, frame repairs, lens coatings, final inspection and ophthalmic equipment maintenance will be included.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program, "C" or better in OPS 103
Offered: Spring

OPS 204 – Contact Lens Clinical

OPS 204 – Contact Lens Clinical

3 credits
This clinical course will put concepts mastered in OPS 106 in conjunction with content in the concurrent course, OPS 206, into practice. Students will use contact lens equipment to design, fit, verify and dispense contact lenses.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program, "C" or better in OPS 106
Offered: Fall

OPS 205 – Ophthalmic Dispensing II

OPS 205 – Ophthalmic Dispensing II

3 credits
This course is a continuation of concepts mastered in OPS 105. The course will require students to complete a rotation in the Clinical Dispensing Lab (Training Store).
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program, "C" or better in OPS 105
Offered: Summer

OPS 206 – Contact Lens Theory II

OPS 206 – Contact Lens Theory II

3 credits
This course is a continuation of concepts mastered in OPS 106. Curriculum to include, Contact Lens Fitting, Contact Lens Modification and Contact Lens Theory.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program, "C" or better in OPS 106
Offered: Fall

OPS 208 – Ophthalmic Practice Management

OPS 208 – Ophthalmic Practice Management

3 credits
A course to prepare an eyecare professional for the business aspect of managing an ophthalmic practice. Curriculum to include: Business Management, Opticianry Sales Technique, Patient Relationship, Professional Ethics, Current Trends in the Optical Industry and Best Practices in Marketing.
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Ophthalmic Science Program
Offered: Spring

Management and Leadership

OS 101 - Team Dynamics and Individual Skills

OS 101 - Team Dynamics and Individual Skills

3 credits
This course focuses on the organizational structure as it relates to individual and team contributions. The role of teams and their functions are explored to develop team based skill sets for contemporary organizations. This course looks at team processes, development, diversity and conflict management within the team. Students will learn and practice techniques for setting group goals, creating safe environments, managing groups effectively and encouraging the formation of group identity. Students will identify ethical concerns relating to teams.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 160 - Leadership Practice and Theory

OS 160 - Leadership Practice and Theory

3 credits
The focus of this course is on contemporary leadership theories and the dual role organizational personnel find themselves in as followers, team members and leaders. This course explores the dynamics and responsibilities of each role and the situational and ethical applications that may be encountered. Students will explore personal inventories and assessments to enhance self-awareness and personal leadership style. The leader's role in the organization's culture and ethics is examined.
Prerequisite(s): OS 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 180 - Organizational Supervision and Administrative Roles

OS 180 - Organizational Supervision and Administrative Roles

3 credits
This course focuses on the organizational essentials of supervising personnel and the connections with Human Resources, unions and the organizational mission. Topics include supervisory principles, the role of discipline, motivation and the practice of coaching, teambuilding and mentoring. Ethical concerns of supervision are discussed in case studies. Monitoring and assessing performance to detect and correct substandard performance is also examined. It further looks at management's role in the supervisory process and develops good decision-making approaches to supervisory challenges. Supervisory ethical considerations are explored.
Prerequisite(s): OS 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 210 - Organizational Communications

OS 210 - Organizational Communications

3 credits
The focus of this course explores the variety of ways communications are carried out in the organization and the meanings and effects of those communications. The course provides an overview of contemporary communications theory, principals and practices that drive organizational effectiveness. Students will examine effective communication planning for the organization as well as identify communication skills necessary to build their personal communication competencies such as persuasion, influence, negotiation and instructing. Students will explore the ethical considerations around the sharing of information and the communication process. Students will develop a communication plan.
Prerequisite(s): OS 101, OS 160, COM 1XX
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 230 - Organizational Ethics

OS 230 - Organizational Ethics

3 credits
This course focuses on the role of ethics in the organization and includes the study of ethical paradigms, the ability to make value judgments, think critically and apply sound problem-solving models to address ethical dilemmas within organizations.
Prerequisite(s): All OS 100 level courses, PHIL 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 250 - Understanding Worker Behaviors

OS 250 - Understanding Worker Behaviors

3 credits
This course is designed to explore the variety of workplace structures that employees encounter and allows the participant to understand their worker preferences in structuring their work environment, whether as individual or team member, leader or follower. Developing a social perceptiveness to others' actions in the work place fosters more effective responses to workplace challenges, allows finding better fits between worker styles and tasks, and creating positive work environments. Participants also explore several personality traits of the worker as well as emotional intelligence in the workplace. Students examine the ethical aspects of worker behaviors and their impact on the organization. This course includes the development of a written analytical piece on worker hindering behaviors and solutions via the use of case studies and student observations.
Prerequisite(s): All OS 100 level courses, PSY 112
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 310 - Positive Mentoring

OS 310 - Positive Mentoring

3 credits
This course is designed to assist students in understanding the foundational knowledge and skills in being effective mentors or mentees in any occupational setting. Students will review best practices for specific mentoring strategies, develop effective communication skills for ensuring success of knowledge/skill transfer, understand the importance and benefits of diversity in a mentoring relationship given generational, cultural, and gender differences, and explore effective means for conflict resolution through teachable moments. Throughout the course, students will gather useful strategies and resources for both themselves and their potential mentees for effective relationship development and sustainability. Students will develop a mentor resource manual for an organization (for-profit or non-profit) that includes: potential policies/procedures, communication strategies for mentors, assessment initiatives to gauge mentoring success, conflict management strategies, how to address mentorship within a diverse organization, and a guide to effective strategies for developing teachable moments. This resource manual will serve as a foundational guide for mentors and mentees as they work to develop and foster relationships within an organization.
Prerequisite(s): None
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

OS 315 - Organizational Theory

OS 315 - Organizational Theory

3 credits
This course explores classical and neoclassical theories of organizations along with the traditional and contemporary structures of organizations and provides insights into the dynamics of modern organizational structure. It further considers the interaction of personnel and organizational characteristics as they relate to job performance and attitudes in Human Resource Theory. Students also examine the effects of active learning and listening within the organization and the process of making the organization a learning organization through the lens of culture and environment.
Prerequisite(s): OS 210, OS 250
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 320 - Cross-cultural Competencies in Organizations

OS 320 - Cross-cultural Competencies in Organizations

3 credits
This course examines the diversity of the workplace and its connection to local and global communities. It develops a social perceptiveness and explores the realities of cultural differences across boundaries in the modern workplace and examines those implications. Strategies for effectively building diverse workplaces are explored as are the ethical implications that arise in areas of diversity.
Prerequisite(s): All OS 200 level courses
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 330 - Talent Development and Performance Assessment

OS 330 - Talent Development and Performance Assessment

3 credits
This course focuses on processes and approaches to ensure that organizational goals are met effectively and efficiently, building on the KSA's of OS180. Emphasis is placed on how to effect behavior and results, through a positive performance assessment process and develop personal development plans for career advancement within an organization or career field. Developing skills in personal planning, needs assessment and developing one's own talent within the organization is included. Students learn how behaviors and competencies support the organization vision and mission and how their productivity supports organizational goals. Students are also introduced to an holistic approach to understanding stakeholders in an organization that include both internal and external factors and focus on the methods and tools necessary to develop the commitment and relationships with stakeholders to solidify the organization's structure and mission. The ethical standards of performance assessment are also discussed.
Prerequisite(s): All OS 200 level courses
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 355 - Project Management

OS 355 - Project Management

3 credits
This course introduces students to the complexities of designing, initiating and managing workplace projects. Skills such as time management, resource management, problem identification, budgeting and finance, and coordinating group efforts are integrated into a semester long project. Use of project management software is also introduced.
Prerequisite(s): All OS 200 level courses
Offered: Summer

OS 425 - Facilitating Groups

OS 425 - Facilitating Groups

3 credits
This course is designed to develop the competencies of participants to work in groups effectively and produce results in a timely fashion. Leading groups or teams through facilitation takes a special set of competencies in communication, listening, group dynamics, coaching, problem-solving and conflict resolution.
Prerequisite(s): All OS 300 level courses
Offered: Summer

OS 430 - Organizational Change

OS 430 - Organizational Change

3 credits
This course focuses on the change process within an organization and exams that change through a variety of change models. Students learn about the mechanical side of change along with the human side. It also examines change behaviors and coping strategies for personnel engaged in organizational change, such as overcoming resistance. Students learn to identify critical elements of organizational change and the importance of excellent communications to facilitate sustainable change.
Prerequisite(s): All OS 300 level courses
Offered: Fall, Spring

OS 450 - Capstone: Strategic Planning for Organizations

OS 450 - Capstone: Strategic Planning for Organizations

3 credits
This course examines the process of strategic planning for long-term viability of an organization, as well as the dynamics that drive the strategic planning process. Essential to that process is developing a vision for an organization and defining its goals in light of the organization’s mission. Therefore, in this course, students will learn the role each organizational member plays in developing and executing a strategic plan. Developing critical, research-based, decision-making skills as integral to the strategic planning process is also a focal element of this course. r (F, Sp)
Prerequisite(s): All lower-level OS classes
Offered: Fall, Spring

Back to the top


Occupational Therapy Assistant

OTA 100 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy and Task Analysis

OTA 100 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy and Task Analysis

3 credits
This course provides an introduction to the profession of occupational therapy. The history and philosophy of the profession is presented with a focus on professional roles and responsibilities and standards of practice within a variety of treatment settings. Students are introduced to the Official Documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and legislative acts that influence the practice of occupational therapy. In addition to exposure to various practice areas and the changing practice of healthcare. Students are introduced to occupational therapy media and its application to the specific life tasks of the disabled. Activity analysis and occupational activities are defined and explored. Students explore the foundations of treatment planning and activity adaptation.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Summer

OTA 101 - Foundations of Movement and Function

OTA 101 - Foundations of Movement and Function

3 credits
This course provides students with an understanding of human movement as a vital component to occupation. The course presents the active and passive structures involved in movement. Students explore biomechanical analysis, neurodevelopment foundations to movement and function. Initial exposure to evaluation and intervention techniques used by occupational therapy practitioners.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): OTA 100
Offered: Fall, Spring

OTA 102 - Clinical Fieldwork I (FW I)

OTA 102 - Clinical Fieldwork I (FW I)

1 credit
This course introduces occupational therapy assistant students to the clinical requirements of fieldwork experiences. Students participate in a variety of learning experiences to prepare them for observation and participation opportunities in clinical and community settings. This course also introduces documentation practices, principles and practice of safety techniques and data collection. 40 hours on site and 5 hours didactic.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): OTA 101
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

OTA 103 - Group Dynamics in Occupational Therapy

OTA 103 - Group Dynamics in Occupational Therapy

1 credit
This course presents a theoretical basis and practical application of group treatment within the context of theories commonly used in occupational therapy treatment. The greater emphasis is on application of skills in psychosocial settings, however, focused discussion and application to behavioral and rehabilitation settings as well.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): PSY 212
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

OTA 200 - Occupational Therapy Assistant and Adult Populations

OTA 200 - Occupational Therapy Assistant and Adult Populations

4 credits
This course presents a theoretical basis and practical application of group treatment within the context of theories commonly used in occupational therapy treatment. The greater emphasis is on application of skills in psychosocial settings, however, focused discussion and application to behavioral and rehabilitation settings as well.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): OTA 101
Offered: Spring, Summer

OTA 201 - Occupational Therapy Assistant and Pediatric Populations

OTA 201 - Occupational Therapy Assistant and Pediatric Populations

4 credits
This course presents the principles and practices of occupational therapy for services provided for infants, children and adolescents. Student identification of the impact of social, environmental and cultural influences in development and delivery of services. Students study provision of occupational therapy services in medical, educational and community-based settings. Additionally, this course presents management aspects of occupational therapy practice in addition to reimbursement models. Lecture and lab.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): OTA 101
Offered: Summer

OTA 202 - Occupational Therapy Assistant and Geriatric Populations

OTA 202 - Occupational Therapy Assistant and Geriatric Populations

4 credits
This course addresses the impact of environmental, cultural and community influences on the older individual, focusing on an ever changing occupational status through the influences of component skills. The impact of social, environmental and cultural influences in geriatric service delivery. Identification of geriatric physical and psychological diseases common to occupational therapy. The methods of treatment and reimbursement available to the occupational therapy practitioner within the context of health care and the community are addressed. Lecture and lab.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): OTA 101
Offered: Fall, Summer

OTA 203 - Case Studies and Practice Applications in Occupational Therapy Assistant

OTA 203 - Case Studies and Practice Applications in Occupational Therapy Assistant

3 credits
This course presents problem-based learning cases, to allow students to apply the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework to simulated practice situations. Students develop essential clinical reasoning skills and professional behaviors for future practice. This course also addresses clinical relevance of general health, safety procedures, models of reimbursement and documentation.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): OTA 200, OTA 201, OTA 202
Offered: Fall, Summer

OTA 220 - Occupational Therapy Assistant Seminar

OTA 220 - Occupational Therapy Assistant Seminar

1 credits
Provides for discussion of Level II fieldwork experiences and opportunity to apply logical thinking, critical analysis, problem solving, and creativity to application problems. Addresses preparation for registration and licensing as well as preparation for the role of professional on the job site.
Prerequisite(s): OTA 203
Corequisite(s): OTA 250
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

OTA 250 - Advanced Fieldwork Level IIA

OTA 250 - Advanced Fieldwork Level IIA

5 credits
Provides an eight-week, full-time or a part-time (equal to eight weeks fulltime), supervised clinical internship to develop professional behaviors consistent with the profession standards and ethics, apply previously learned academic knowledge as an OT team member. The student will gain experience in application of the OT treatment process from admission to discharge for patients from a variety of socio-cultural backgrounds and ages in the practice area of physical disabilities.
Prerequisite(s): OTA 203
Corequisite(s): OTA 220
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

OTA 260 - Advanced Fieldwork Level IIB

OTA 260 - Advanced Fieldwork Level IIB

5 credits
Provides an eight-week, full-time or a part-time (equal to eight weeks fulltime), supervised clinical internship to develop professional behaviors consistent with the professions standards and ethics, apply previously learned academic knowledge as an OT team member. The student will gain experience in application of the OT treatment process from admission to discharging for patients from a variety of socio-cultural backgrounds and ages in the practice area of behavioral, sensorimotor, and/or developmental disabilities.
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Paraprofessional

PAR 110 - Becoming a Paraprofessional

PAR 110 - Becoming a Paraprofessional

3 credits
This course defines the roles and responsibilities of paraprofessionals related to the support of student instruction in a public school classroom environment. Specific attention will be given to the instructional role of the paraprofessional for facilitating conversations, building relationships, supporting the classroom curriculum and assisting in the classroom management.
Prerequisite(s): ECE 101
Offered: Summer

Back to the top


Phlebotomy

PHB 103 - Introduction to Laboratory Services

PHB 103 - Introduction to Laboratory Services

3 credits
This introductory course will present the student to the various areas of the laboratory. Topics will include specimen processing, specimen handling, laboratory divisions, quality control, HIPAA, and legal issues. Finally, students will learn about CLIA regulations and practice performing CLIA waived tests. Formerly listed as HSC 103.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PHB 104 - Medical Terminology/Anatomy and Physiology

PHB 104 - Medical Terminology/Anatomy and Physiology

3 credits
This course teaches medical terminology through a review of anatomy and physiology of the body. Students will gain a basic knowledge of word building, use, pronunciations, spelling of medical terms, applying terms to the function and structure of body systems. Emphasis is placed on medical terms in periodicals, textbooks, and medical care areas. Formerly listed as MED 104.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PHB 120 - Principles and Practice of Phlebotomy

PHB 120 - Principles and Practice of Phlebotomy

3 credits
This course introduces students to basic venipuncture techniques. Students will learn infection control, needle safety and general safety techniques. In addition, student will acquire the theory and skill required to safely draw blood using routine venipuncture techniques. Formerly listed as MED 120.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PHB 121 - Advanced Phlebotomy Skills

PHB 121 - Advanced Phlebotomy Skills

3 credits
The course builds upon the skills and knowledge acquired in PHB 120. Students will reinforce their routine phlebotomy skills, while acquiring new skills. Students will learn how to collect blood utilizing syringe techniques, as well as perform capillary collection. Formerly listed as MED 121.
Prerequisite(s): "C" or better in PHB 120
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PHB 299 - Phlebotomy Internship/ Seminar

PHB 299 - Phlebotomy Internship/ Seminar

3 credits
The Phlebotomy Internship/Seminar course is the culminating course of the Phlebotomy Certificate Program. Students gain practical experience in a clinical setting. This course provides extensive on-site experience in a laboratory setting that allows the student to utilize previously acquired skills. It provides the students with valuable employment experience, increasing the student's marketability. Additionally, students will be required to attend workshops and seminars specifically geared towards examining the role of professionalism in Phlebotomy. Finally, students will be required to attend CPR for the Healthcare Professional
Prerequisite(s): "C" or better in all PHB courses
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Philosophy

PHIL 100 - Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL 100 - Introduction to Philosophy

3 credits
This course introduces students to a broad range of philosophical issues; readings include major philosophers of the Western tradition: Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Schopenhauer, and Sartre. Students will consider issues of ethics, the nature of reality, religious philosophy and the nature of God, the limits of human knowledge, freedom and predestination, and the nature of the good life. C e/p
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Summer

PHIL 101 - Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking

PHIL 101 - Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking

3 credits
This course eaches how to identify, understand, and evaluate arguments by developing critical thinking and logic skills. The course mphasizes the distinction between fact and opinion, inductive and deductive reasoning, logical fallacies, and critical analysis of controversial social, political, and ethical issues with an emphasis on implications for business management and leadership. C e/p
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

PHIL 103 - Ethical & Legal Issues

PHIL 103 - Ethical & Legal Issuess

3 credits
Addresses both ethical theory and contemporary controversial issues that confront students and citizens today, through readings and essays on current issues such as euthanasia, abortion, sexual morality, equality, economic justice, the environment, and ethical considerations in science and technology. C e/p
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

PHIL 105 - Ethics, Values, and Cultural Competence in Human Services

PHIL 105 - Ethics, Values, and Cultural Competence in Human Services

3 credits
This course will acquaint students with the professional and ethical issues that affect human service practitioners. Codes of ethics from various human service professional organizations will be studied and the course will also explore the role and importance of civility and values as they relate to providing services to people. In addition, students will develop an understanding of cultural competence and the need to reflect it when working with typical populations served by human service professionals. Other topics that will be studied include conscious use of self, clarification of values, awareness of diversity, choosing the least intrusive intervention in the least restrictive environment, client self-determination, confidentiality of information, recognition of the worth and uniqueness of the individual including culture, ethnicity, gender, religion, abilities, sexual orientation, and other expressions of diversity, and, belief that individuals, services systems, and society can change. C e/p
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PHIL 301 - Contemporary Perspectives in Philosophy

PHIL 301 - Contemporary Perspectives in Philosophy

3 credits
This course provides students with the opportunity to investigate a number of timeless and more recent philosophical issues, through contemporary readings chosen to stimulate individual reflection, as well as classroom discussion and debate. Students will be encouraged to refine their critical thinking, logic, and argumentation skills. C e/p
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 & PHIL 100 or instructor permission
Offered: Spring

Back to the top


Physics

PHY 110 - Medical Physics

PHY 110 - Medical Physics

3 credits
This course introduces students to the basic principles of respiratory care physics. Topics include work, energy, fluid dynamics, the mechanics of ventilation, and Starling's Law. Dimensional analysis, the kinetic theory of matter, the gas laws, associated chemical laws, and temperature scales will also be explored.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 101
Offered: Fall, Spring

Back to the top


Political Science

PSC 101 - Introduction to Political Science

PSC 101 - Introduction to Political Science

3 credits
This course provides an introduction to world governmental structures to acquaint students with a basic understanding of the principles and methods used in analyzing the social sciences with specific references to politics and government. Topics iInclude the examination of fundamental concepts, the varieties of governmental structures, political philosophies and institutions, and contemporary political issues. G w
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

PSC 201 - The Legislative Process

PSC 201 - The Legislative Process

3 credits
This course reviews the basic structures of American national and local government, and then analyzes the lawmaking process in Congress and in the legislative branch of the government of Connecticut. Students will consider the role of public interest groups in educating public officials on the need for a bill, the mobilization of public opinion in favor of the bill through letters to newspapers and other organs of public discourse, appearing before legislative committees to advocate for the bill, considering the economic aspects related to the bill, and tracking the bill through the legislative bodies to passage and signing by the chief executive. The course also impresses on students the potential power each citizen has to influence lawmaking, and provides hands-on experience in lobbying and advocacy at the Connecticut State Legislature. G us
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall

Back to the top


Public Safety and Security

PSS 310 -Organized and White Collar Crime

PSS 310 - Organized and White Collar Crime

3 credits
Students will examine the history and development of organized crime. The course will examine the structure and organization of traditional organized crime entities and street gangs within a national and global perspective. The theories and development of white collar crime will be evaluated. Students will examine the development of white collar crime and describe its relationship to corporate crime, state crime and political corruption.
Prerequisite(s):Completion of CJS or HSM Track or Department Approval
Offered: Fall

PSS 315 - Drugs and American Society

PSS 315 - Drugs and American Society

3 credits
The course provides a contemporary look of drug use and its impact on public safety and security professionals and their environment. Students will examine the effects of drug as it related to ethnicity, social class, gender and age.
Prerequisite(s):Completion of CJS or HSM Track or Department Approval
Offered: Summer

PSS 320 - Cyber Hate: Bullying, Hate Groups and Terrorism

PSS 320 - Cyber Hate: Bullying, Hate Groups and Terrorism

3 credits
The course will examine the social, legal and psychological implications of cyber bullying and cyber hate. Students will gain insight into the high risk behaviors of youths and their vulnerabilities. Students will also discuss cyber threats, cybercrime and cyber terrorism, as a national and international trend. Students will examine the relationships between various forms of cyber hate and the strategies to prevent cyber hate.
Prerequisite(s):CAP 110 and CJS/HSM 130 or CJS/HSM 131 and CJS/HSM 230 or CJS/HSM 231 or CJS/HSM 232
Offered: Spring

PSS 330 - Completion of CJS or HSM Track or Departmental Approval

PSS 330 - Completion of CJS or HSM Track or Departmental Approval

3 credits
Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of various criminological theories for criminal behavior. Students will examine theories as they developed through history and how they impact social policy and the criminal justice system. The course will discuss various theories of crime and contemporary theories of ‘justice’ and peacemaking, both in the United States and Internationally.
Prerequisite(s):Completion of CJS or HSM Track or Departmental Approval
Offered: Fall

PSS 340 - Business Continuity

PSS 340 - Business Continuity

3 credits
The course will examine the application and value of business continuity plans. Students will design hypothetical, all-hazards, business continuity plan. Students will gain an understanding of the business continuity cycle, to include: plan design, plan development, exercise planning and assessing and revising the plan. Students will be exposed to case studies and conduct business impact analysis.
Prerequisite(s):Completion of CJS or HSM Track or Departmental Approval
Offered: Spring

PSS 350 - Multiculturalism in Public Safety and Security

PSS 350 - Multiculturalism in Public Safety and Security

3 credits
This course will examine the importance of multiculturalism within public service as well as the relationship of public service and a multicultural society. Students will identify differences between specific cultures and how to address stereotypes and related issues. Students will examine how cultural differences impact perceptions and relationships. The course will identify barriers to communication and issues related to discriminatory activities. National and international trends will be identified and compared.
Prerequisite(s):HSM 105, PHIL 103 or PHIL 105 or Departmental Approval
Offered: Spring

PSS 360 - Risk Reduction through Environmental Design

PSS 360 - Risk Reduction through Environmental Design

3 credits
This course will give students an in-depth understanding of the historical, theoretical, legal and practical development of reducing security threats through environmental design. Environmental design has become an important part of infrastructure protection and crime prevention. Students will be able to assess and identify potential protective measures and apply design strategies.
Prerequisite(s):Completion of CJS or HSM Track or Departmental Approval
Offered: Spring

PSS 390 - Research Methodology and Writing

PSS 390 - Research Methodology and Writing

3 credits
Students will explore the methods of research within the social sciences, specifically as it applies to Public Safety and Security. The students will create a hypothetical research design. Students will examine research designs, sampling, and general issues associated with academic research.
Prerequisite(s):HSM/CJS 106 and STAT 167 or Departmental Approval
Offered: Fall

PSS 391 - Quantitative Applications in Public Safety and Security

PSS 391 - Quantitative Applications in Public Safety and Security

3 credits
Students will be introduced to statistical analysis and methodology used in social science research. Students will gain experience using SPSS for data analysis. The course will explore probability theory, hypothesis testing, and testing for bivariate relationships. Students will be able to analysis and identify relationships between groups.
Prerequisite(s):STATS 167 and PSS 390
Offered: Spring

PSS 450 - Public Policy Analysis

PSS 450 - Public Policy Analysis

3 credits
Students will examine the process of designing and implementing a public policy. Students will research and develop a policy addressing a current public issue: including researching and analyzing data. The development of the policy will include theoretical and statistical analysis. The course will prepare students for designing new policy and analyzing existing policy.
Prerequisite(s): PSS 390 and PSS 391
Offered: Summer

PSS 490 - Capstone: Seminar in Public Safety and Security

PSS 490 - Capstone: Seminar in Public Safety and Security

3 credits
This is a capstone course in which students will research and analyze a contemporary Public Safety and Security issue. Students will integrate qualitative and/or quantitative data to support the research and analysis. The course will challenge students as they defend the research and conduct an oral presentation of the findings to faculty and peers. Students will practice the skills critical to program management, research and problem analysis.
Prerequisite(s): PSS 390 and PSS 391
Offered: Summer

Back to the top


Psychology

PSY 112 - Introduction to Psychology

PSY 112 - Introduction to Psychology

3 credits
This course introduces the fundamental concepts of psychology, including physiological psychology, neuropsychological principles, sensation and perception, cognition, learning, child and adult development, social psychology, personality, and abnormal psychology. Students will focus on understanding human behavior and its application to everyday life. S
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PSY 115 - Child Development

PSY 115 - Child Development

3 credits
Addresses the developmental characteristics, developmental processes, and developmental issues that have been identified as being of importance and/or typical for children in general and children with special needs from conception through age eight. Employs both theoretical and applied strategies in the study of the social, emotional, cognitive, physical, and psychological development of the young child. S
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of ENG 099 or equivalent or Co-req of ENG 099
Offered: Summer

PSY 201 - Group Dynamics

PSY 201 - Group Dynamics

3 credits
This course provides an overview of current developments, research and theoretical bases of group behavior: stages of group development; structure, power and leadership roles and styles; group tasks, group maintenance; pressures for conformity and deviance; impact of individual member behavior on group dynamics; roles, intra-group conflict, group problem solving and decision making. Through interpersonal and small group interactions students will gain insight into themselves, their impact on others and examine expectations and assumptions about groups. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Fall, Spring

PSY 205 - Organizational Behavior

PSY 205 - Organizational Behavior

3 credits
This course provides theoretical and practical knowledge for understanding motivation, leadership, managerial decision making, group processes and conflict resolution within the context of organizational design and culture. Students will examine the complexities of human interactions, including individual and group behavior and human relations skills needed to succeed in social and work environments. Topics include communications, ethics, personal and organizational values and attitudes, social structures, and customs and taboos. Formerly listed as PSY 120. S
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Summer

PSY 210 - Psychology of Learning

PSY 210 - Psychology of Learning

3 credits
This course provides a study of human behavior in learning situations,. including theories of development and learning, individual differences, conditions for learning, and dynamics of achieving learning outcomes. Students will focus on working with individuals in a variety of educational and agency settings. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Summer

PSY 212 - Life-Span Development

PSY 212 - Life-Span Development

3 credits
This course presents the basic theories and concepts used in the study of the human lifespan, including physical, cognitive, personality, and social development from conception through death. Students will examine the cultural nature of human development and relevant socio-emotional processes. Topics will emphasize the understanding of human development from personal, theoretical and professional perspectives. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

PSY 215 - Abnormal Psychology

PSY 215 - Abnormal Psychology

3 credits
This course provides students with a basic understanding of abnormal human behavior by examining an overview of psychiatric disorders. Students will examines the history, theories, models and classification of mental disorders and approaches to their treatment. Familiarizes students with vocabulary and diagnostic categories currently in use including DSMIV-TR. Topics will cover the mental health profession and relevant legal, social and ethical issues. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Fall

PSY 218 - Adolescent Development

PSY 218 - Adolescent Development

3 credits
The physical, cognitive and social-emotional development of adolescents, with special emphasis on major theories and research methods are examined in this course. Students will consider the influence of heredity, family, peers, school, media and community as contexts within which adolescents develop. Discussion will focus on diversity issues such as culture, socio-economic class, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation, as well as, common adolescent problems. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Spring

PSY 265 - Advanced Child Development

PSY 265 - Advanced Child Development

3 credits
This course is designed to help students gain a complex understanding of child growth and development for children beginning with conception and continuing through early adolescence. Students will explore how current practice has arrived at this level of understanding and how research in child development can be applied in the various settings in which children develop. Students will have opportunities to become familiar with many topics including but not limited to prenatal development, education theory and its link to child development, moral development, and working with families to development school and community partnerships. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 115
Offered: Summer

PSY 300 - Health Psychology

PSY 300 - Health Psychology

3 credits
This course serves as a comprehensive introduction to the field of health psychology. Students will address both theoretical and applied aspects of health psychology. Topics included, but not necessarily limited to: stress, pain and coping; behavioral factors in disease; health promotion; and research methods in health psychology. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Spring

PSY 302 - Infant and Toddler Growth and Development

PSY 302 - Infant and Toddler Growth and Development

3 credits
This course is an in-depth study of the growth and development of young children from conception through three years old. Students will examine developmental milestones and educational theory. Students will have an opportunity to connect theory and developmental milestones to curriculum and environmental planning. Students will learn about various approaches to working with infants and toddlers such as the R.I.E. approach and responsive caregiving. This course will also focus the many ways in which to connect with the families of our youngest children. Students will examine the findings of current brain research that impact the work with infants and toddlers. (Cross-referenced to ECE 302) S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 115
Offered: Spring*

PSY 305 - Psychology of Personality

PSY 305 - Psychology of Personality

3 credits
This course provides an overview of the major personality theories and contributing research evidence. Students will examine the theoretical differences in the motivation and dynamics of behavior, analyze and critique the major approaches to personality theory (psychodynamic, learning, dispositional, humanistic/existential). and study research strategies specific to the study of personality. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Fall, Summer

PSY 310 - Motivation

PSY 310 - Motivation

3 credits
This course covers motivational processes underlying the arousal, direction and maintenance of behavior, evaluates major theories of motivation with an emphasis on recent empirical findings and their relevance for future research. Students will analyze social, biological, and cognitive factors involved in motivated behaviors and emotional states. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Spring

PSY 315 - Psychology of Death and Dying

PSY 315 - Psychology of Death and Dying

3 credits
This is an intense course in both its emotional content and its learning activities. As Homo-sapiens we are the only species conscious of its own mortality. The course provides students with an understanding of the human processes of dying, death and bereavement; topics on attitudes and practices in preparation for death; understanding of and care for the terminally ill; funeral rituals, burial, mourning and grief practices; grief counseling; and suicide and euthanasia. To confront death and dying as a part of life helps to reduce unnecessary suffering, loss of dignity, alienation, and diminished quality of life – understandings essential for individuals as well as professionals in the field. Formerly listed as PSY 225. S
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112 or Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall

PSY 320 - Group Counseling

PSY 320 - Group Counseling

3 credits
This course addresses the use of groups in the practice of counseling. Its purpose is to help students become more effective group leaders, whether leading a therapy or a training group, and to be able to influence the process of groups in which they are members. To this end, students will participate on several levels of involvement: (1) Principles, theories, concepts, and techniques of group leadership will be investigated; (2) Group dynamics will be discussed and observed in external groups and in the class interaction; (3) Students will lead a group session with a co-leader; and (4) Students will be group members. Students will not be asked to self-disclose.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Spring

PSY 330 - Tests and Measurement

PSY 330 - Tests and Measurement

3 credits
This course addresses the basic theories, applications and issues in psychological testing. Topics covered include reliability, validity and norming common to all test construction; legal and ethical issues relevant to psychological testing; major instruments used in the measurement of intelligence, personality, aptitude, and achievement; and, uses of testing in specail situations (e.e., clinical and counseling settings, industrial/organizational settings). By the end of this course, students will be able to describe the theory and procedures that underlie the construction, validation and interpretation of psychological tests; demonstrate the administration, scoring, interpretation and reporting of selected tests; demonstrate competence in the use of Library & Internet sources of information about psychological tests; and, describe some of the issues involved in the actual use of testing for decision-making.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring

PSY 340 - Exceptional Child II

PSY 340 - Exceptional Child II

3 credits
This course is designed to promote child development and learning by familiarizing students with the characteristics and needs of all exceptional learners. A continual introduction of terms and concepts within a more narrowly defined topic area with discussions of videos, case studies, and presentations of the review of related literature pertaining to exceptional children will be engaged. These activities will add to the emergence of terms and concepts associated with special education. The concept of Inclusion as a means of educating students with special needs will be deeply discussed and students will become familiar with the historical events and social reform that laid the background for this method of instruction. Students will have opportunities to ponder opposing viewpoints on special education issues. Students will investigate the use of drugs as a means of curbing inappropriate conduct of students with special needs and recognize symptoms, modify environments, and plan appropriately so that children can be successful. A large focus of this course will be on community outreach and family involvement. (Cross-referenced to ECE 340.)
Prerequisite(s): ECE 101 and ECE 201
Offered: Summer

PSY 350 - Cross-Cultural Psychology

PSY 350 - Cross-Cultural Psychology

3 credits
This course is an introduction to culture's influence on human behavior and mental processes. Topics begin with an examination of theoretical definitions of culture, and cover a broad range of theories and research findings regarding cultural influences on human behavior and cognitive processes (life-span development, abnormal behavior and mental health, self-concept, emotion, motivation, learning, intelligence, perception, memory, communication, social cognition, and social behavior). Students will examine the diversity of human expression in contexts ranging from everyday modes of functioning to family and work relationships. Students are provided with a non-judgmental understanding of how culture influences human behavior and are better equipped to interact in a world where there is increasing contact among different cultures. Students will also gain knowledge in cross-cultural research methodology. S mc
Prerequisite(s): PSY 112
Offered: Fall

Back to the top


Respiratory Care

RSP 110 - Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & Physiology

RSP 110 - Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & Physiology

3 credits
An in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the pulmonary and cardiac system. Topics include but are not limited to: the circulatory system, applied physiology and physical principles of the respiratory system and gas exchange.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 212
Offered: Fall, Spring

RSP 112 - Principles of Respiratory Care

RSP 112 - Principles of Respiratory Care

4 credits
This course introduces students to basic principles of clinical respiratory care. Topics include but are not limited to: medical gas therapy, patient assessment, OSHA and infection control standards, oxygen therapy, aerosol therapy, humidification, bronchial hygiene therapy, hyperinflation therapy, ethics and professionalism, and medical documentation. This course includes a skills practice lab.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 212
Offered: Fall, Spring

RSP 120 - Applied Pharmacology

RSP 120 - Applied Pharmacology

3 credits
This course includes the study of the composition, dosage, modes of action, indications and contraindications for and effects of medication administered to patients treated in the field of respiratory care. Emphasis is placed on drugs prescribed for the cardiopulmonary, renal, and neurological system.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 212
Offered: Spring, Summer

RSP 121 - Integration of Respiratory Care Skills

RSP 121 - Integration of Respiratory Care Skills

4 credits
The theory and administration of respiratory care procedures, airway management, monitoring devices, and clinical assessment of the respiratory patient. The clinical component includes supervised clinical application of principles learned in the classroom. Students will be scheduled for clinical rotations at various health care facilities. Topics include: medical gas therapy, patient assessment, aerosolized medication delivery, documentation, and chart research.
Prerequisite(s): RSP 110, RSP 112, PHY 110
Offered: Spring, Summer

RSP 132 - Mechanical Ventilation

RSP 132 - Mechanical Ventilation

6 credits
A study of mechanical ventilators used in respiratory care with an in-depth explanation of function and application. Indications, hazards, and complications of mechanical ventilation, and weaning will be emphasized. This course includes a skills lab. The clinical component includes supervised clinical application of principles learned in the classroom. Students will be scheduled for clinical rotations at various health care facilities. Topics include: bronchial hygiene techniques, bi-level positive pressure breathing and radiographic and laboratory assessment of the respiratory patient. Formerly known as Airway Management and listed as RSP 131.
Prerequisite(s): RSP 121, RSP 120
Offered: Fall, Summer

RSP 221 - Principles of Critical Care

RSP 221 - Principles of Critical Care

5 credits
A study of pulmonary and cardiac assessment, critical care monitoring and fluid and electrolyte balance as it relates to cardiopulmonary medicine. Topics include: EKG rhythm interpretation, central venous pressure monitoring, pulmonary artery pressure monitoring, and intra-cranial pressure monitoring. The clinical component includes supervised clinical application of the principles of continuous mechanical ventilation in adult critical care. Students will be scheduled for clinical rotations at various health care facilities.
Prerequisite(s): RSP 131
Corequisite(s): RSP 231
Offered: Fall, Summer

RSP 231 - Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology I

RSP 231 - Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology I

3 credits
This course focuses on the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiopulmonary abnormalities and diseases of the adult patient.
Prerequisite(s): RSP 131
Corequisite(s): RSP 221
Offered: Fall, Spring

RSP 233 - Respiratory Care Capstone

RSP 233 - Respiratory Care Capstone

2 credits
This course is designed to prepare the student to sit for the Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) exam and the Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) exam offered by the National Board of Respiratory Care (NBRC). The course provides an in-depth review of respiratory care principles, airway management, and pulmonary and cardiac assessment, and respiratory care modalities used in the care of patients.
Prerequisite(s): RSP 231
Corequisite(s): RSP 261
Offered: Spring, Summer

RSP 261 - Comprehensive Respiratory Care

RSP 261 - Comprehensive Respiratory Care

7 credits
A comprehensive study of the respiratory care modalities used in the care of pediatric and neonatal patients. Topics include but are not limited to: diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, embryology, cardiopulmonary pathopysiology, ventilator management, and critical care techniques. The clinical component includes supervised clinical application of the principles of continuous mechanical ventilation as well as critical care monitoring in adult, pediatric, and neonatal critical care. Students will be scheduled for clinical rotations at various health care facilities
Prerequisite(s): RSP 221, RSP 231
Corequisite(s): RSP 232
Offered: Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Science

SCI 110 - Exploring Life

SCI 110 - Exploring Life

4 credits
This course provides students with an introduction to life science. The focus is on 5 topics that form the foundation of biology: evolution, ecosystems, cells, homeostasis, and genes. As we explore these ideas, you will be introduced to the general principles of cell biology, chemistry, and biochemistry. Exploring Life will also develop an understanding of the principles of physical science as they apply to life science. The intent is to help you create a "mental filing cabinet," whose folders you will fill as you progress through this and other sciences courses, and to emphasize the connections between ideas in life and physical science. In addition, this course allows you to learn and practice basic skills required for success in science. These include: critical thinking, safety procedures, identification, of lab equipment, microscope use, creation of lab reports (with accurate and appropriate data tables and graphs), application of the scientific method, and understanding, of the structure of the Periodic Table, and competent use of the metric system and scientific notation.
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Sociology

SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology

SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology

3 credits
This course examines the theoretical perspectives, origins and history of sociology. Students will be challenged to do research and to think critically in examining cultural issues in American society and the world. Topics include human socialization, macro- and micro-sociological perspectives of social structure, class, status, stereotypes, groups, norms, and deviance; examines the impacts of technology, mass media, social inequality, gender, marriage, family, and social change. S
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

SOC 110 - Contemporary Social Problems

SOC 110 - Contemporary Social Problems

3 credits
This course considers contemporary social problems and their implications for human services from historical, sociological, political and economic perspectives. Students will focus on the development of critical thinking skills. Topics will cover poverty, educational underachievement, crime and violence, and emerging problems of under- resourced communities.Students will consider the impact of race, ethnicity, and gender as variables in contemporary social problems. S mc
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring

SOC 201 - Multicultural Issues

SOC 201 - Multicultural Issues

3 credits
This course focuses on heightening awareness and appreciation of diversity; considers political, religious, sexual and cultural identities as well as lifestyle differences, problems of race, nationality, regions and language patterns.Students will examine myths concerning group differences and assumptions regarding ethnicity and culture of the economically deprived, senior citizens, and children. This course looks at political and social oppression of minorities and their status in the U.S. Students will be expected to participate in open discussions and engage in scholarly readings. S mc
Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
Offered: Fall, Summer

SOC 301 - Sociology of Aging

SOC 301 - Sociology of Aging

3 credits
This course examines demographic changes, role shifts, age stereotyping, age norms, stratification, retirement and institutionalization from a sociological perspective, and their implications for the treatment and status of older adults. Students will explore the processes of aging in the later years and the impact of the same on people's lives. The focus of this course is on aging in American society. S
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Spring, Summer

SOC 315 - Family-School-Community Partnerships

SOC 315 - Family-School-Community Partnerships

3 credits
This course explores the role of relationships between families, schools, and the communities in which families reside. Students will deepen their understanding of the importance of family involvement in the school system and examine creative strategies for including parents and families in the school. Students will also analyze contemporary family patterns and composition in order to more effectively connect with the families in their communities. Students will recognize that children are highly impacted by the environments in which they live. Topics in social studies will be explored as students have opportunities to discuss the importance of involving community partners, culture and diversity in the school system. Major theorists will be studied. This course also includes a 20-hour community volunteer project of the student's choice. (Cross-referenced to ECE 315)
Prerequisite(s): Departmental Permission
Offered: Fall

Back to the top


Spanish

SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I

SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I

3 credits
This course Introduces students to spoken and written Spanish. In addition to the material in the text, a substantial focus is on Hispanic culture, including literature, music and art. Students will be provided with a foundation in speaking and writing the Spanish language and understanding Hispanic culture. No previous knowledge of the Spanish language is required. THIS COURSE IS RECOMMENDED TO STUDENTS WITH NO PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF SPANISH. C
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II

SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II

3 credits
This course continues to expand students' understanding and practice of spoken and written Spanish. Topics will emphasize building progressively complex grammar and conversational skills. Students will be exposed to Hispanic literature and culture with increasingly advanced scope and depth. C
Prerequisite(s): C- or better in SPAN 101 or proficiency exam
Offered: Spring

SPAN 103 - Spanish for Health Care Professionals

SPAN 103 - Spanish for Health Care Professionals

3 credits
This course focuses on teaching Spanish to students entering or currently in the medical field. Students will learn the terminology, phrases and information relevant to the medical work environment. This course includes an intensive study and practice of communication skills required in "real world" medical work situations and provides the fundamentals of the Spanish language. C
Prerequisite(s): none
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

SPAN 203 - Spanish for Health Care Professionals II

SPAN 203 - Spanish for Health Care Professionals II

3 credits
This course focuses on the continued development of skills initiated in Spanish 103. The enhanced study of functional Spanish vocabulary and grammar prepares health care workers to interact with their patients and their patients’ families with cultural sensitivity. C
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

SPAN 206 - Spanish for Heritage Speakers

SPAN 206 - Spanish for Heritage Speakers

3 credits
This course is designed to specifically promote Spanish proficiency in Native/Heritage Spanish-for speakers who plan to use their language in a Human Services setting. Students who are looking to write grammatically-correct Spanish, improve reading comprehension and expand their vocabulary in order to express themselves formally, are encouraged to take this course. These tools will help students become more proficient in the Spanish language and be able to use these skills in Spanish-speaker interactions. *Students who are interested in taking this course will be directed to talk with the Spanish Course Coordinator before signing up for the course. Please note: This course will be taught in Spanish. C
Prerequisite(s): Native to Near Native Spanish
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top


Statistics

STAT 167 - Principles of Statistics

STAT 167 - Principles of Statistics

3 credits
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and processes of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics that will be covered Include the collection, organization, and graphical representation of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals for population means, hypothesis testing for population means, and linear and regression and correlation. Students will be required to use a TI 83 or TI 84 graphing calculator. Formerly listed as MATH 167. A
Prerequisite(s): Completion of MATH 125 or higher with a grade of "C" or better
Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Back to the top

Last Modified: 7/2/2014

© . All Rights Reserved. | Home
Request Enrollment Information


Change Image


[ X Close ]